Playhouse Presents “Annie”

One of the most popular comic strip heroines takes center stage in “Annie” at the Highlands Playhouse through Sunday, August 17. The original Broadway production of “Annie” won seven 1977 Tony Awards, including Best Musical, Book, and Score.

With equal measures of pluck and positivity, Little Orphan Annie charms everyone’s hearts, despite a next-to-nothing start in 1930s New York City. She befriends President Franklin Roosevelt and finds a new home and family in billionaire Oliver Warbucks, his personal secretary Grace Farrell, and a lovable mutt named Sandy.

Boasting one of Broadway’s most memorable scores, including “It’s the Hard-Knock Life,” “Easy Street, N.Y.C.” and the famed “Tomorrow,” Annie will leave you with an ever-optimistic feel that the sun will come out tomorrow.

Annie will star 16-year-old Highlands resident Bailey Baker. Bailey was selected because of her incredible talent as a young actress with a dynamic voice and magnetic stage presence. She has been performing in the Highlands community since she was very young, and she has been the talk of the town to be the star of “Annie.”

The evil Miss Hannigan will be played by the well-loved Heidi Spoon. Heidi originally hails from New York City where she enjoyed a career in musical theatre for over 20 years. She has performed on Broadway, Off-Broadway, Broadway National Tours, International tours, regional theatre, cruise ships, church basements, nightclubs and barns.

“‘Annie’ is a good, old-fashioned Broadway show, “says Artistic Director Bill Patti. “It is light hearted and has an incredibly sweet message. What excites me the most is how well we are integrating the community into the production. We have orphans from Highlands, Franklin and Rabun County. They are six of the most talented young ladies that I have had the pleasure of watching perform and the audiences are going to adore them. Also, we are utilizing a cast of 24 in “Annie.” That will make it the biggest show at the Playhouse in quite a few years!”

The Highlands Playhouse is located at 362 Oak Street, Highlands. Individual tickets for “Annie” are $30 for adults and $12 for children 12 and under. Show times are Tuesday-Saturday at 8:00 P.M. and Sunday matinees at 2:00 P.M. Group tickets (10 or more) are available now at savings up to 30 percent. For additional information or to order tickets, call the Box Office at (828) 526-2695 or email highlandsplayhouse@yahoo.com.

Contributed by Tammy Hernandez

 

The Cast of “Annie” at Highlands Playhouse

The Highlands Playhouse will present  the classic “Annie” through Sunday August 17.

Leading the cast is Clay Smith, who joins the Highlands Playhouse for the first time this season. Fresh from the national tour of “Fiddler on the Roof,” Smith portrays Oliver “Daddy” Warbucks the seemingly tough billionaire who adopts Annie from the orphanage. Along with the United States tour of “Fiddler,” Smith has also appeared on the Asian tour of “The Sound of Music” as Franz, and with Momentum Repetory Company
of Highlands.

Smith says he is thrilled to join “such a great company and great people,” adding that he most recently enjoyed “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” which ran through June 20. Smith holds a Doctor of Musical Arts in Vocal Performance from LSU.

As the hilarious Ms. Hannigan, Highlands Playhouse is thrilled to welcome back Heidi Johnson-Spoon, most recently seen as Mona in last year’s production of “Dames at Sea.” Ms. Spoon’s career has spanned over 20 years, appearing notably on Broadway in “The Wizard of Oz” with Eartha Kitt and Mickey Rooney, as well as the subsequent national tour. Also on tour, Ms. Spoon has appeared with Roger Miller in “Big River” and sang for President George H.W. Bush at the White House. A favorite at the playhouse, Ms. Spoon is excited to be joined by her daughter Gracie, who will be playing the role of Molly, as well as her student Annalese Starzec. She is also excited to be working with her friend, Bill Patti.

Highlands Playhouse favorite Rachel Schimenti returns for her third season as the scheming Lily St. Regis. Playhouse regulars will remember her this season as Maria Elena in “The Buddy Holly Story” and as Logainne in “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee.” Previous seasons have seen her as Joan in “Dames at Sea” and Dee Dee in “Suds.” Along with her work here in Highlands, Schimenti as been seen with Alhambra Dinner Theatre and was an Irene Ryan Award Semi Finalist for her work as Olivia in “Twelfth Night.” Schimenti says she loves the company here in Highlands and is particularly thrilled to be playing Lilly.

Rounding out the cast is Bailey Baker as Annie, Jimmy Lewis as Rooster Hannigan, Samantha Pauly as Grace Ferrel, Noah Berry as Bert Healey, Stuart Armor as Drake, Annabelle Fox as Star To Be, Dan Holtsclaw as Franklin Roosevelt and Sandy the Dog as Sandy. The orphans will be played by Jessie Keuhne, Abigail Gilbert, Hayley Hawkins, Gracie Spoon, Cameron Sweet, and Annalese Starzec. Kameron Stambaugh, Zach Snyder, Emmanuel Davis, Kacey Willis, Wesley Carpenter, Jonathan Chisolm, Peter Seifarth, Madison Munich, and Kate Jones will fill the ensemble. “Annie” is directed by Bill Patti, with Nigel Huckle as assistant director. Brieanna Bailey choreographs and daMon Goff music directs.

The Highlands Playhouse production runs through August 17 with shows Tuesday through Saturday at 8:00 P.M. and Sundays at 2:00 P.M. The Highlands Playhouse is located at 362 Oak Street, Highlands, NC, 28741. Individual tickets for adults are $30 and $12 for children 12 and under. For additional information or to order tickets, call the Box Office at (828) 526-2695 or email highlandsplayhouse@yahoo.com.

The 2013 Musical Season of Love and Laughter continues with “Nunsense” (October 4-13). We invite you to visit the new Highlands Playhouse website at
www.highlandsplayhouse.org.

Contributed by Tammy Hernandez

 

“Dinner at Seven” in Highlands NC

Highlands United Methodist Church will stage “Dinner at Seven,” at 5:30 P.M. Friday, August 2. The musical is the product of the church’s Summer Music Camp for children.

“We held the camp from 9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. July 29 – August 2, and this performance is the result of the kids’ hard work,” said HUMC Minister of Music Les Scott. “We draw upon students from local churches and children who don’t attend church and those who may just be visiting Highlands and Cashiers for the summer.  They learn the basics of choral techniques and how to perform in front of a crowd – it’s a lot to learn in one week’s time, but somehow every year our campers rise to
the occasion.”

“Dinner at Seven” was written by Luke Osteen and Les Scott and marks the latest collaboration between the two, a partnership stretching back five years. It’s the story of a group of elementary school students learning that the presence of Christ can be felt in the most unlikely of places.

Everyone is invited to attend the performance and admission is free.

Betsy Paul Art Raffle in Cashiers NC

The Betsy Paul art raffles for the  Cashiers Glenville Volunteer Fire Department, will be held on August 31, in the afternoon. For more information, call  (828) 743-0880.

The Betsy Paul art raffles for the
Cashiers Glenville Volunteer Fire Department, will be held on August 31, in the afternoon. For more information, call
(828) 743-0880.

This is the fourth time that Annell Metsker has graciously donated a painting to benefit the Cashiers-Glenville Fire Department through the monthly art raffle held at Betsy Paul Properties.  Annell’s creation, given for the August Art Raffle, is a delightful painting of a Highlands’ Barn.

Annell L. Metsker, known professionally as Annell, combines photography and painting to create images that evoke the soul of her subjects and portray mood and emotion visually. Whether she is creating a portrait, landscape or figurative work of art she is able to use the beauty and mystery of light and shadow, and the rhythm of motion to captivate the viewer’s attention. She works intuitively with her subjects to reveal beauty and authenticity in her art. Whether you are looking for a photographic portrait, or a painting of your children, family, pets, or a favorite travel image, Annell will create a work of art that captures their true essence.

Annell finds her creative muse in her home on Lake Glenville where the peacefulness and energy of the mountains inspire her paintings. Her portrait studio in Charlotte, specializing in heirloom portraits of children and families, has been named Best of Charlotte Photographers for several years. In 2012 Annell received the prestigious Silver Medal Award from Professional Photographers of America for her excellence in print competition.  Her art is exhibited at Blue Valley Gallery in Cashiers, Tsartistry Gallery and Gallery of Gems in Franklin, www.annell.com  and has pride of place in many private collections across the US.  Contact her at annell@annell.com, (828) 743-5784 or (704) 847-8281.

Viewers are invited to see each month’s raffle item on display from 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M., Monday through Saturday at Betsy Paul Properties, 870 Highway 64 West, Cashiers, North Carolina. Checks can also be mailed directly to the Cashiers-Glenville Fire Department, P.O. Box 713, Cashiers, North Carolina, 28717. For more information contact Betsy Paul Properties, (828)743-0880.

 

Art League of Highlands

Peggy McBride

Peggy McBride

Peggy McBride of Lakemont, Georgia, will be the guest speaker at the Art League’s August 26 meeting in the Hughes Studio of the Bascom.  McBride calls herself a “Book Artist” these days, yet her artworks rarely include a front and back cover.  After 40 years as a mixed media artist working in leather, textiles and found objects, the Book Arts medium for McBride presents unique assemblages of discarded objects into unexpected sculptural presentations.  She recently transformed the former Globe Gallery into her studio and is devoted to the exploration of sculptural ways to promote the preservation of our world. She was also one of the featured artists in Asheville at Blue Spiral’s recent “Appalachian Trail” exhibit.  At the meeting, McBride will share some of her handmade books and birdcage books plus a bit of her poetry.  Social hour is at 4:30 P.M. and the program begins at 5:00 P.M.  Both are open to the public and free of charge.

A new workshop is available.  In 1980, Catherine Christy, a well-know local artist and former Highlands resident, helped to start what became known as “Studio Alive,” where live models posed for artists to do sketches, drawings and paintings.  In 2007 the group disbanded, but this past winter, Catherine, assisted by Pat Calderone of the Art League of Highlands, worked to revive the concept, and it is now operating again.  Each Tuesday from 1:00 – 4:00 P.M. in the Community Center above the Scaly Mountain Fire Department, local artists of varying skill levels gather in a casual setting to work and share ideas about art and the expression of the human figure.  A different model poses each week.  A modest cost of $20 is required for four sessions, and artists supply their own materials (no oils).  All interested artists should call Catherine Christy (706) 782-4060 or Pat Calderone (706) 746-5540 or www.studioalive.net for more information.

Contributed by Zach Claxton

 

 

Highlands PAC

The Hit Men

The Hit Men

The Martin-Lipscomb Performing Arts Center’s Summer Concert Series is over, with three sold out concerts.

The Highlands PAC is getting ready for the Fall Concert Series.  Be sure to save the dates and call now for tickets. Makes plans to join us Saturday, September 28, for the nationally known Storyteller Andy Offutt Irwin.  Andy is always a headliner at the National Storytelling Festival in Jonesboro, Tennessee.  This performance is presented by Nell Lipscomb Martin and Lynda Lipscomb Wexler.

On Saturday, October 5, The Hit Men visit Highlands.  This band includes four of the original members of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons.  In addition, they have composed for and performed with Tommy James and The Shondels, Carly Simon, Cat Stevens, Elton John, Barry Manilow and many others.  They’re presented by Beth and Dan Riley, Diane and Ray McPhail, Minnie Bob and Mike Campbell, Louise and Rick Demetriou, Ruth Gershon and Sandy Cohn, Jane Webb and David LaCagnina, Harry Norman Realty, Carole Simmons, Cindy and Rick Trevathan, and Peggy Woodruff.

Rounding out the Fall Concert Series on Friday, November 29 (the Friday night after Thanksgiving) is Bluegrass with David Holt and Josh Goforth.  David Holt is a four-time Grammy Award winner.  It is another extraordinary evening, not to be missed. The performance is presented by Ray and Diane McPhail and Doug and Barbara DeMaire.

Call (828) 526-9047 now to reserve tickets or, to purchase tickets online, visit highlandspac.org.

 

Contributed by Mary Adair Leslie

 

Highlands-Cashiers Players

The Cast of Almost, Maine

The Cast of Almost, Maine

The men and women of Almost, a small fictitious town in northern Maine, pose for the camera on a cold winter’s night. These bundled up folk are the cast of the Highlands Cashiers Players’ August production, “Almost, Maine,” a whimsical romantic comedy in which various characters fall in and out of love under the luminous glow of the northern lights in this witty winter’s tale.

Pictured above, front row left to right: Ellen Agee, Ivy Trent, Alona Khorolska, Rachel Woods, Megan McLean, Raina Trent.  Back row (L to R): Robert Trotter, Lance Trudel, Kevin Murphy, Ted Wisniewski, and Chris Hess.  Not pictured is Pam Moore.

“Almost, Maine,” written by John Cariani, directed by HCP’s Virginia Talbot, consists of nine bittersweet tales which will, with their unexpected twists and quirky humor, provide enchanted entertainment at the Highlands Performing Arts Center Thursdays through Sundays, August 22 through September 1. The HCP box office opens for season subscribers on Thursday and Friday, August 15 and 16, and for others on Saturday, August 17.  Hours are 10:00 A.M. to 4:oo P.M., and one hour before the performances which start at 7:30 P.M. on weekdays, and 2:30 P.M. on Sundays.

For tickets or more information, call the Highlands-Cashiers Players’ box office at (828) 526-8084, or visit thier website at www.highlandscashiersplayers.org.

Come to the Cabaret!

Carrie Hardy

Carrie Hardy

 

Jason Hardy

Jason Hardy

Just because the Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music Festival’s performance season wraps up in August, that doesn’t mean that its event season is over.

Still up on its calendar is Come to the Cabaret!, a cabaret concert slated for 6:00 P.M. Sunday, September 15 at the Highlands Playhouse. This rollicking good time will feature Jason and Carrie Hardy singing some of the most beloved Broadway, opera, and American Songbook favorites. They’ll be accompanied by pianist William Ransom – the Festival’s artistic director.

Complementing the irresistible music is the fine food and wine catered by Wolfgang’s Restaurant & Wine Bistro.

It’s an evening to benefit the Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music Orchestra and the Highlands Playhouse. Tickets are $100 per person. For more information or reservations, call (828) 526-9060.

By Luke Osteen

 

21st Annual Bel Canto Recital in Highlands NC

Heather Witt

Heather Witt

September 8 will be Bel Canto Recital’s 21st anniversary.

As always the recital itself will be followed with an elegant dinner at Highlands Country Club.  This year it will again feature four singers – soprano, mezzo-soprano, tenor, and baritone.  Dr. Stephen Dubberly, our accompanist since Bel Canto’s inception, will again accompany the performance and will perform a solo piece as well.

Associate Professor in the Division of Conducting and Ensembles at the University of North Texas, Dr. Dubberly also serves as Music Director of UNT Opera and teaches opera conducting and opera repertoire.

He made his conducting debut in 1993 in Opera Theatre of Saint Louis’ American-premiere production of Judith Weir’s “The Black Spider.” Since then, he has conducted for Des Moines Metro Opera, the Knoxville Opera Company, San Antonio Opera, Cartersville Opera, American Bel Canto Opera, the Teatro Accademico in Castelfranco Veneto, Italy, the Teatro Goldoni in Venice, Opera Athens (Georgia), the University of Tennessee, and Webster University.

He has also conducted frequently for Amarillo Opera, including productions of “Don Giovanni,” “The Barber of Seville,” “Don Pasquale, Rigoletto,” “Pirates of Penzance,” “Falstaff,” “I pagliacci,” “La bohème,” the regionally-broadcast production of Gene Murray’s “The Wage of Sin,” and “Carmen.”

Dr. Dubberly also wears the hat of Chorus Master and Principal Coach for Fort Worth Opera. His career as an opera coach includes six seasons with Opera Theatre of Saint Louis, where he served as Ensemble Coordinator and Principal Coach, Assistant Conductor, and Music Director of various educational projects. He has been Associate Conductor at Des Moines Metro Opera, Assistant Music Director for Opera Carolina, and co-director of the Knoxville Opera Company’s Education and Outreach program. Singers he has partnered in recital include Mary Dunleavy, Mignon Dunn, Kaaren Erickson, Elizabeth Futral, Denyce Graves, Brenda Harris, Weston Hurt, Kristine Jepson, and Jeffrey Wells.

Critics have hailed him as “the perfect partner” (Richmond News) and “the ideal accompanist” (New Haven Register).  It is a real privilege to have him as our accompanist here in Highlands.

To contact Bel Canto and get on the mailing list, please call (828) 526-5213 or e-mail highlandsbelcanto@gmail.com.  You can also  mail your contact information to Bel Canto Recital, P.O. Box 2392, Highlands, NC 28741.

Contributed by Janet Grantham

 

Your Child’s Musical Growth

After expressing a desire to learn a musical instrument, your child has made a commitment to sticking to it. So you have enrolled them in lessons at the local music store or academy. What are some of the ways that you can support your child’s

learning endeavors?

Attitude is number one; the parent’s attitude. This is especially true as regards goal setting and measurement of this. Well-designed music lessons will take goal-setting into account. Instruction done in this way will cultivate the child’s own goal setting skills.  It will nurture the child’s own internal measurement against these goals. This is the very thing that drives your child forward in their learning. Nothing else will truly drive the child forward than their own desire to learn. Goals should be tied directly to this desire. Teachers and parents need to work cooperatively toward this. No worse harm can be done than parents or teachers setting their own goals, and measuring the growth of the child to their own sense of where the child should be. There is no surer way to switch off the child’s desire to learn.

Regular meetings are in order between parents, teacher, and child. Discussion should be made as to what constitutes progress. And in this way, the child learns bigger knowledge than just the mechanics of playing and instrument. A sense of healthy growth as a learner is set, and maintained. The child gets a bigger sense of self-guidance, a skill that applies to all kinds of life-subjects.

The most important thing that a parent can do to support their child’s ongoing music pursuits is to culture a sense of gentle uplifting attitude. This will do more to gently nurture the child-learner than a more judgmental, rule-stick kind of approach. It is a fact that learners who are encouraged do better than those who are prodded and critiqued. Instead, develop the child’s own sense of self-growth. With these simple steps your child will embark on a lifelong journey to musical self-discovery and
rich fulfillment.

Contributed by J. Christian Miller

 

Rotary Club of Highlands Bingo for a Cause

Highlands Rotary Bingo offers friendly games and the chance to benefit the community.

Highlands Rotary Bingo offers friendly games and the chance to benefit the community.

The Rotary Club of Highlands will sponsor Relay for Life Bingo at 6:30 P.M. Thursday, August 1, at the Highlands Conference Center.
A total of 15 games will be played, and cards are $1 each, per game.  Multiple cards are available for an additional $1 per game.  Cash prizes are awarded for each game, and everyone is guaranteed to have a ton of fun while supporting a great cause!
Each year, the Rotary Club of Highlands has sponsored a team to raise funds and awareness for the mission of the American Cancer Society. The funds raised by Relay for Life are used for cancer research, advocacy, and outreach to improve the lives of cancer patients and their families.  This year’s Relay takes place on Friday, August 9, beginning at 6:00 P.M. There will be food, music, and games as team members walk all night, because cancer never sleeps.
You can also show your support by being a Table Sponsor for $50 for a full-page ad, or $25 for a half-page.  Call Rotary Relay co-captain Christy Kelly at (828) 787-2124 to purchase your ad.
If you can’t be there for Bingo, you can still support Relay for Life by mailing your donation to Rotary Relay Team, P O Box 1742, Highlands, NC  28741.  All checks should be payable to the Rotary Club of Highlands.

By Wiley Sloan

Rotary Bingo for Dental Clinic in Cashiers

You can support the Tooth Fairies of the Blue Ridge Free Dental Clinic at 6:30 P.M. Thursday, July 11, at the Highlands Community Building for Highlands Rotary Bingo.

The evening will feature 15 games and cards are $1 each.

The Blue Ridge Free Dental Clinic is based in Cashiers and provides high quality restorative dental care to hundreds of needy patients each year from the surrounding tri-county area, many of whom have never seen the inside of a dentist’s office. The volunteer dentists and their staff completed more than 1,150 patient visits last year.  With their expanded facilities they are hoping to be able to serve even more patients this year.

Medicare does not provide any dental services, and while Medicaid provides limited dental assistance, large portions of the needy population, particularly the working poor, do not qualify for that program. As a result, many of the clinic’s patients have gone for years or even a lifetime without preventative dental care. In some cases, hospital emergency rooms and low-income medical clinics provide temporary treatment for pain and infection, but medicine alone cannot deal with the rotten teeth that must be addressed for the patient to have a normal life — or in some cases, even to survive. Restorative procedures such as complex fillings, root canals, crowns and dentures are necessary to restore a normal appearance and smile to people disfigured by dental disease.

Highlands Rotary Bingo is a perennial favorite on the community’s Event Calendar. Although many of the crowd are game night regulars, newcomers are always welcome. There’s always at least one game called “The Biggest Loser” where the last person to cover his first number wins a prize.

Win or not, you still have tons of fun.

You can also show your support for the Free Dental Clinic by being a Table Sponsor.   Invite enough of your friends to fill an entire table.   Then buy an advertisement for your table or for other tables, too.    This opportunity is open to business owners and individuals.   A table ad is $50 or a half-page ad is $25.  Make your checks payable to Highlands Rotary Club and send them to P O Box 451, Cashiers, NC 28717. Call the Clinic at (828) 743-3393 to purchase your advertisement.  They will be glad to design your ad copy for you.

The Highlands Community Building is located next to the Town Ballfield.

By Wiley Sloan

 

Joy Garden Tour in Cashiers NC

The Joy Garden Tour, benefitting The Village Green, is a  celebration of Cashiers’ natural beauty and the hard work of a  community of gardeners and landscapers.

The Joy Garden Tour, benefitting The Village Green, is a
celebration of Cashiers’ natural beauty and the hard work of a
community of gardeners and landscapers.

One of the highlights of this summer in Cashiers is the 2013 Joy Garden Tour benefitting The Village Green, July 17-21.

In addition to the tour of beautiful private gardens, other events include a Floral Lecture and Demonstration, Gala Patron Party and a New Orleans Jazz Brunch. These events are advance ticket sales only.

The Garden Shops are open to everyone from 9:00 A.M. until 5:00 P.M. Friday, July 19, and from 10:00 A.M until 3:00 P.M. on Saturday, July 20, at The Village Green Commons on Frank Allen Road.

Shoppers can browse the selections from more than 30 vendors. A boutique experience of choice items appeals to garden and floral enthusiasts but also features a discriminating collection of antiques, personalized items, gourmet food, distinctive home furnishings, clothing, jewelry and more. “It’s for the Birds” will be in The Garden shops again this summer with their one-of-a-kind architectural replica birdhouses as will LTM Designs, a sought-after merchant with unique personalized papers. Several popular local merchants such as Dovetail Antiques, Robin’s Nest and Keven Hawkins Home and Garden will bring merchandise. The Look will also sell jewelry and clothing.

The Joy Garden Tour is named in memory of Carolyn Joy Dean, who gave generously to help establish The Village Green, a 12.5 acre park in the center of Cashiers. Through the dedicated efforts of volunteers who share her spirit, Joy Garden Tour raises money for conservation and improvements to The Village Green for area residents and visitors to enjoy.

“We are grateful to this hard-working group who organize the Joy Garden Tour,” says Jochen Lucke, chairperson of The Village Green Board of Directors. “Their support of and devotion enables The Village Green to preserve the future and provide excellence to the community.”

For more information about Joy Garden Tour events and The Garden shops, email info@villagegreencashiersnc.com To learn about The Village Green, visit www.villagegreencashiersnc.com.

By Ann Self

 

Big Ol’ Mountain Breakfast in Cashiers

The Fishes and Loaves Food Pantry is saving a generous  plate for you at the Annual Big ‘Ol Mountain Country Breakfast,  7:00 to 11:00 A.M., Saturday, July 6.

The Fishes and Loaves Food Pantry is saving a generous
plate for you at the Annual Big ‘Ol Mountain Country Breakfast,
7:00 to 11:00 A.M., Saturday, July 6.

The Cashiers community invites you to enjoy their Annual Big Ol’ Mountain Country Breakfast to benefit the Fishes and Loaves Food Pantry. Come join them from 7:00 to 11:00 A.M., Saturday, July 6, at the Cashiers Community Center on U.S. 64 (the Highlands Road).  Proceeds from this popular event will support the efforts to feed needy neighbors throughout the year.

“Annually, we average over 2,000 family visits, distributing roughly two and a half tons of food per month,” says Fishes and Loaves Food Pantry spokeswoman Carole Stork. “The people we serve are a mixture of local residents and Latino immigrants who are out of work primarily in the winter months, and a small number of senior citizens.”  Over seven years ago, the churches in the Cashiers community decided it would be a better idea to combine their efforts to provide this service for our neighbors in need.  Volunteers solely run the organization. Funds generously donated by individuals, churches and community service organizations underwrite the expenses.

Donations are accepted.  If you cannot attend the breakfast but would like to support the Fishes and Loaves, send your contributions to Fishes and Loaves Food Pantry, P.O. Box 865, Cashiers, NC 28717.

 

4th of July Celebration Activities in Highlands NC

The 4th of July Celebration in Highlands is a tradition filled with family fun, good eats, community camaraderie and, of course, a spectacular fireworks show.

These festivities begin at 9:30 A.M. at the ball park with a Water Rocket Launch. Thursday, July 4 will bring games children and adults, among which will be a three-legged race and a water balloon toss. Other happenings at the ball park include a visit by “MAMA,” the hospital’s emergency helicopter and the Fire Department’s ladder truck will be on display.

The Rotary Club of Highlands will hold its Annual Barbecue from 11 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. at the Highlands Community Center next to the Town Ballfield. A second location will be on Hickory Street at the ball park.

This group of public spirited men and women will work through the night to ensure that there’s plenty of barbecue on the Fourth. They’ll be serving up hamburgers, hot dogs, barbecue pork or chicken fillets. The box lunch will include pickles, potato chips and a cookie. This year the barbecue will be cooked by Highlands’ famous chef, Joel Porter. All condiments will be available. No tickets or reservations are required. Proceeds from the barbecue help support the Rotary Club of Highlands’ many service projects for the community and the rest of the world.

At 1:00 PM at Mill Creek, the stream by SweeTreats, the Second Annual Rotary Rubber Duck Derby will be held. Purchase a rubber duck for $10 and have a chance to win $250 for 1st place, $100 for 2nd place and $50 for 3rd place.

First Presbyterian of Highlands will present the annual patriotic concert at 8:00 P.M. This free concert will las-t approximately 45 minutes, ensuring plenty of time to watch the town fireworks display. Featured will be  Dave Landis, bagpipes; Larry Black, trumpet; Angie Jenkins, pipe organ; and the Highlands Male Chorus under the direction of Joe Powell, with Carol Guise as accompanist. Come dressed as you are. The church is located at 471 Main Street. Handicapped entrances are located on Church Street and on Fifth Street.

Then, with the fall of darkness, the Highlands Chamber of Commerce brings a spectacular fireworks show that’ll be visible throughout the downtown.

Summer Season of Interlude Concerts in Highlands

The summer season of weekly Interlude concerts will begin on July 10. The series is in its fifteenth season. The free concerts are sponsored by the First Presbyterian Church and the Episcopal Church of the Incarnation, and are held on Wednesdays at 2:00 P.M. Dress is casual.

Interlude concerts began when Rev. Hunter Coleman of the First Presbyterian Church and Father Mike Jones of the Episcopal Church of the Incarnation, both former ministers, decided to create a new ministry for Highlands. The concerts provide a break from the hustle and bustle of everyday life – a time to meditate, relax, and enjoy a variety of music. Visitors to Highlands are especially invited to join our members and friends at these mini concerts. This year’s lineup includes:

July 10 – TBA – Episcopal Church

July 17 – Trey Clegg, organ; Larry Black, trumpet

Presbyterian Church

July 24 – TBA – Episcopal Church

July 31 – Appalachian Brass Quintet

Presbyterian Church

August 7 – TBA – Episcopal Church

August 14 – Georgia State University Vocal Concert

Presbyterian Church

August 21 – TBA – Episcopal Church

August 28 – Mountain Faith Bluegrass Group

Presbyterian Church

Contributed by Angie Jenkins

 

 

Fireworks on the Green in Cashiers NC

The Village Green will stage its Fireworks Extravaganza On the Green at 5:30 P.M. Friday, July 5, at The Village Green Commons on Frank Allen Road. The Greater Cashiers Area Merchants Association is partnering with The Village Green to create a spectacular evening for residents and visitors during Independence Day Weekend.

The festivities include live music by The Extraordinaires, a rhythm and blues band that will be sure to have you dancing. Food and drink will be available for purchase or those who want can pack a picnic dinner. People should plan to bring lawn chairs for general seating. Admission is free, however a limited number of VIP packages are available that include valet parking, reserved seating and drink tickets for the event.

You can buy VIP packages by calling the GCAMA office at (828) 743-8428.

The highlight of the night will be the colossal fireworks display with music that accompanies the show.

“More than 500 brilliant pyrotechnics will burst red, white and blue across the Cashiers Valley night sky,” noted Village Green executive director Ann Self. “What could be better than watching fireworks with family and friends at The Village Green?”

Many small towns and communities have cut or drastically reduced fireworks displays in recent years because of financial constraints. The Village Green stepped up to ensure this would not be the case in Cashiers.

“The Village Green is delighted to preserve another treasured tradition for our community, and we hope that this will be the best part of the holiday weekend for people here in the area,” said Jochen Lucke, chairperson of the Village Green Board
of Directors.

The mission of The Village Green is to enhance the quality of life for those who live and vacation in the greater Cashiers area. Last year, it hosted more than
80 events.

Fireworks are provided through the Jackson County Board of Commissioners and the Parks and
Recreation Department.

“Events like the fireworks extravaganza would not be possible without the generous support of our donors,” Self said.

For more information about The Village Green, visit www.villagegreencashiersnc.com.

Contributed by Ann Self

 

Children’s Theatre Camp at Highlands Playhouse

Highlands Playhouse is excited to announce the return of summer Children’s Theatre and Dance Camp with sessions running from July 1 through August 2.

Children’s Camp Director Brieanna Bailey and Artistic Director Bill Patti will challenge campers to discover, explore and develop every aspect of theatre – acting, singing and dance.

“The theatre has a special way of inspiring children,” said Bailey. “We are dedicated to bringing their creativity out in any way we can through the theatre. Campers will be able to strengthen their skills and build friendships that will last a lifetime.”

The Theatre Camp will be held from July 1 – July 13 at the Highlands Playhouse. The camp is a two-week session concluding with a free performance for family, friends and the community in which campers will sing, act and dance their way to a standing ovation at the Highlands Playhouse on Saturday, July 13 at 11:00 A.M. Class times are 9:30 A.M. to noon for ages 6 – 10 and from 1:00 to 4:00 P.M.  for ages 11-14.

The Musical Theatre Camp will be held from July 15 – July 27 at North Georgia Performing Arts  Studio in Rabun Gap, Georgia. The musical theatre camp is a two-week session focusing on acting, singing and dance. Class times are 9:30 A.M. to 12:00 P.M.  for ages six to eleven and from 1:00 P.M.  to 4:00 P.M.  for ages twelve and up.

Dance Camp will run from July 29 – August 2 at North Georgia Performing Arts Studio. The dance camp is a one-week session and will serve as an intensive dance class for different levels. Class times are 9:00 – 10:00 A.M. for Ballet Princess ages four to six, 10:15 A.M. to 12:15 P.M.  for Beginner Ballet and from 1:00  to 4:00 P.M.  for intermediate and advanced students.

Students who come to the camps will leave with a deeper understanding of the theater arts and a greater appreciation for the work of theater professionals.

For camp pricing, more information or to register for Highlands Playhouse Children’s Summer Camp please call (828) 526-2695, email highlandsplayhouse@yahoo.com or visit www.highlandsplayhouse.org.

Highlands Playhouse is located at 362 Oak Street in Highlands.

Contributed by Chesley Owens

 

Cashiers’ Mountain Tennis Challenge

Cashiers Mountain Tennis Challenge

Cashiers Mountain Tennis Challenge

Andy Roddick and Jim Courier, world-class tennis stars, are serving up some love for kids this summer at The Mountain Challenge, the weekend of July 26.

Former world-ranked number-one tennis professional Andy Roddick is passionate about helping brighten the futures of our country’s youth. When he became a seasonal resident of the Cashiers community, he enthusiastically threw his support to Mountain Youth Charities.

“The goal is to establish a long-term program for all kids in this area,” said Event Chairman William McKee. “And we are so fortunate to have these two champions at the heart of our event.”

As part of The Mountain Challenge, a Gala Mountain Dinner will be held at Canyon Kitchen at Lonesome Valley on Friday, July 26. Courier and Roddick along with their families will be celebrity guests at the dinner. In addition to a fabulous feast, there will be an auction featuring premium gifts and packages donated by community businesses and supporters.

The exhibition will be held Saturday, July 27, at Cedar Creek Racquet Club. In addition to the Courier-Roddick event there will be a preliminary match between Brevard’s Korey Lovett, a nationally ranked junior tennis player, and Charlotte’s Thai Kwiatkowski. Thai is rated in the top ten in the international junior rankings, and his former coach is Cedar Creek general manager, Scott Handback.

After the preliminary match, the winners of the Pro-Am Competition determined the previous week will square off against Roddick and Courier in doubles before the feature match. There will also be a chance for spectators to try to return a 140 mph serve (Roddick’s signature service speed) delivered by an automated ball machine at a fast serve contest.

To inquire about the event or purchase tickets go to www.cashiers.com or call (828) 743-3411. Share the love.

by Donna Rhodes

 

 

USGA Senior Amateur Championship to be Held in Cashiers NC

Wade Hampton Golf Club will host the prestigious United States Golf Association’s 2013 USGA Senior Amateur Championship, to be held September 18-26.

“Wade Hampton is excited to be able to give back to the game,” says Wade Hampton general manager Jeff Heilbrun. “For us to have been chosen to host this championship validates the quality of our course. This is the first national championship to be held in our region and we are so proud to be able to host these great players and highlight the beautiful North Carolina Mountains. It is very gratifying to know that the USGA is very pleased with the current setup of the golf course and will make very few alterations to the course,” Jeff says.

It’s not surprising that the Tom Fazio-designed course was chosen. Golf Digest ranked the course as the 22nd best course in the nation in 2013, and Golfweek has named Wade Hampton as the top residential golf course numerous times over the past eight years.

The USGA Senior Amateur Championship is open to men 55 years old or older who have a USGA Handicap Index not exceeding 7.4.  Players must qualify at one of 53 sites between July 30 and August 15 to play in the championship, which comprises 156 players. To follow the qualifying rounds and daily updates and scoring during the championship, visit USGA.org.

The championship is free to all spectators, who can catch a shuttle to Wade Hampton from the parking lot in front of the Cashiers Fire Department on Highway 64 West, just two blocks from the Village Green. The shuttle will run frequently, and no private cars will be allowed into Wade Hampton. Food and beverages will be available for purchase in a special tent adjacent to the clubhouse.

With some 13 golf courses within 30 miles, Western North Carolina is the perfect spot for golf enthusiasts.  If you’d like to volunteer for one of the many jobs required to support this event, go to www.wadehamptongc.com and complete the Volunteer Form found in the Senior Amateur section, or call Tim Boeve in the Golf Shop at (828) 743-5950.

By Wiley Sloan

 

Saturdays on Pine Summer Concerts in Highlands NC

Saturdays on Pine Summer Concert Series is the new and welcomed addition to the Highlands musical scene.

These free Saturday concerts will continue through August 31. And, as the name suggests, all concerts will be held at the Kelsey-Hutchinson Park on Pine Street. The bands will entertain from 6:00 until 8:00 P.M.

The musical line-up for Saturdays on Pine in July are Stevens Layne, Chompin’ at the Bit, Jen Miller and Thomas Dirk and the ever-popular Corbitt Brothers.

The Tallahassee-based trio, The Tyler Denning Band, will bring their signature blend of blues, funk, folk, soul, reggae and pop to Highlands on July 6.  The cover shot of their debut album, From the Ground Up, was taken from Tyler’s grandmothers house on Panther Mountain.

On July 20, Jen Miller and Thomas Dirk will combine their musical talents on stage. Jen Miller is a singer/songwriter and self-proclaimed dragon slayer. Thomas Dirk brings a soulful acoustic-folk-blues rendition to songs of his own and others. Their combination of voices and sounds is nothing short of mesmerizing.

July 13 will introduce Chompin’ at the Bit to Highlands. Chompin’ is a stringband, and it’s been said that they are the next generation of old-time.  Between the group, their musical ancestors go back over 7 generations. Chompin’ at the Bit respectfully tip their hats to the greats while adding thier own young fresh style to this generation’s old music.

The Corbitt Brothers will light up the Park on July 27. A popular name in Highlands, the Corbitt Brothers are raw, fierce, and use their God-given talent to create and perform music. They have a new album, “Live at Cheers,” and can be downloaded from their website at www.corbittbrothers.com

Super Nitrograss, High 5, Big Nasty and Southbound Turnaround will finish up the series in August.

For more information about Saturdays on Pine, contact the Highlands Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center at (828) 526- 2112.

Laurel Garden 2013 Kitchen Tour in Highlands NC

Laurel Garden Club’s Kitchen Tour is a feast  of the senses.

Laurel Garden Club’s Kitchen Tour is a feast
of the senses.

Laurel Garden Club’s 2013 Kitchen Tour will be staged Saturday, September 21. It’s an exciting visit to six of Highlands’ most exclusive kitchens and will feature cooking demonstrations and an irresistible shop filled with homemade goodies, arts and crafts, and garden delights.

Cost is $60. The tour begins at the Martin-Lipscomb Performing Arts Center (PAC) with shuttle departure times every 30 minutes from 9:00 A.M. to 1:30 P.M.

The tour marks the culmination of a trio of culinary events.

Rubs and Suds will be held at 6:30 P.M. Monday, September 16. Watch Chef Wolfgang Green work his magic in an outdoor venue as he prepares a grilled feast in a state-of-the-art Viking outdoor kitchen, while guests enjoy locally brewed beer, selected wines, and bluegrass music.  Directions will be provided after purchase. This event is limited to 30 guests, and cost is $140 per person.

Garden to Table is slated for 6:30 P.M. Tuesday, September 17. Guests will learn and enjoy as Mountain Top chefs educate and transform the fruits and vegetables of local gardens into a gastronomical feast in a stunning setting.  Directions will be provided after purchase. Cost is $140 per person and attendance is limited to 30 guests.

Finally, the Mad Men Cocktail Party will be held at 7:00 P.M. Friday, September 20. Participants can groove to their favorite 60s tunes while enjoying cocktails from that period and updated appetizers in the comfort of a spectacular Cold Springs home. Cost is $60 per person and the party is limited to 60 guests.

For reservations for the tour and events, or more information, visit www.laurelgardenclubhighlands.com.

Contributed by Brenda Manning  |  Photo by Helen Moore

 

Celebrate, Remember, Fight Back

Cancer survivor Michelle Hunter’s operating philosophy is  embodied on her shirt.

Cancer survivor Michelle Hunter’s
operating philosophy is
embodied on her shirt.

The shirt I am wearing says Celebrate, Remember, Fight Back.

In today’s world, ‘don’t sweat the small stuff’ is a mantra used by many.  After my cancer, I adapted it a bit.  I now say, “Celebrate the Small Stuff.”  The everyday mundane things that we take for granted become the snippets of our lives we grasp for when we are weak.  Routine is comforting, even inspiring, on days when our lives seem to have been turned upside down.  We would give anything to feel good enough to attend our child’s soccer game or band concert, or to walk around window shopping.

Remembering is hard, and I am not just talking about chemo brain.  When we remember those who have not survived this dreaded disease it is painful.  We miss them.  When we remember our journey into the medical world as cancer patients, well let’s just say we’d rather not.  Cancer is a very humbling disease, from being bald, to losing various body parts as you are being carved up like a Thanksgiving turkey.  Sunken eyes, translucent skin, no eyebrows/lashes/nose hair…it all makes you feel subhuman.   The tests and scans are, many times, humiliating.  Being poked and prodded makes you feel as if you are on a cattle drive.  It is painful on so many levels.  We’d rather block all of these things out than remember them.  My question is should you?  Should you put it all under wraps and act as if it never happened?

This is where the next words come in.  Fight Back.  Fighting back looks different for different people.  There are so many ways to do battle.  Donate money to wonderful causes that support cancer victims and their families.  Walk, run, or ride for life in one of the numerous events that raise money for cancer research.  Acknowledging that you have faced down a monstrous foe and have overcome is an inspiration to those who are still in the battle.

This story was submitted by Michele Hunter Gunnin, cancer survivor and daughter of Martha Hunter.

 

Friday Night Live in Highlands NC

Every Friday night from 6:00 to 8:00 P.M.in Highlands,  local bands  will bring the enjoyment of the sounds of music.

Every Friday night from 6:00 to 8:00 P.M.in Highlands, local bands will bring the enjoyment of the sounds of music.

Friday Night Live will rock Main Street once again In July courtesy of the Highlands Area Chamber of Commerce. Every Friday night from 6:00 to 8:00 P.M. in Town Square, a toe-tapping performance will be given by four local bands playing a variety of musical styles from traditional tunes to original compositions.

Kicking off the month, July 5 is the Johnny Webb Band. Born and raised in Highlands, Johnny and his popular band play country selections on guitar, slide guitar and drums. The group’s performance will be a special treat for Highlanders that remember him from days past.

On July 12, the Chris Miller Band, will hit the stage. Chris Miller, from Rabun County Georgia, performs an eclectic mix from rock to alternative country, pop, and indie rock. He teaches guitar and has recently published the first book in his upcoming series, “Creative Guitar Mastery.”

July 19 features Eric Hendrix. Eric is a local folk musician from Sylva, North Carolina, who has been making quite the name for himself in the local
music scene.

Finishing off the month on July 26, the Blue Ridge Music Band will feature a trio from the original Foxfire Boys Band from Clayton, Georgia, Tom Nixon, Filmer Kilby, and Dean English will tune up on guitar, dobro, mandolin, banjo, fiddle and harmonica. Join them for an entertaining evening of traditional and original bluegrass along with old-fashioned gospel.

For more more information on the Friday Night Live Series, contact the Highlands Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center at (828) 526- 2112.

Zahner Conservation Lecture Series

The Highlands Biological Foundation’s annual Zahner Conservation Lecture Series will begin on July 11.  This series is free and open to the public.  All lectures are held at 7:00 P.M.  Thursdays at the Highlands Nature Center.

On July 11, Dr. Alan Weakley, director of the University of North Carolina Herbarium and adjunct professor at UNC-Chapel Hill, will kick-off the series with “Highlands, the Southern End of the Southern Appalachians: Maintaining its Hundred Million Year-Old Biodiversity Legacy.”

The following week, on July 18, South Carolina Master Gardener Rekha Morris will discuss “The Demise of a Single Floral Genus as an Indicator of Environmental Devastation.”

On July 25, Louis Guillette, Professor at the Medical University of South Carolina, will present “Environmental Health, Genes, and Contaminants: New Lessons from Wildlife.”  The Zahner Conservation Lecture Series is an 8-week series, with five lectures in August.  Visit www.highlandsbiological.org/zahner-conservation-lectures for more information.

In addition to evening lectures for adults and life-long learners, HBF offers a “Think About Thursdays” activity series.  On July 11 from 10:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M., you can join Highlands Biological Station staff exploring streams in and around Highlands, conducting aquatic sampling and learning about the state of our streams.  All ages are welcome, and the cost is $10 for members, $15 for non-members.

On July 18, Clay Bolt, co-founder of the Meet Your Neighbors photography initiative, will conduct a Conservation Photography Workshop for children and their parents.  The workshop will be held from 1:00 to 3:00 P.M. and is open to ages 10 and up.  The cost is $10 for members, $15 for non-members.

The Highlands Biological Foundation is a non-profit organization whose mission is to foster research and education focused on the rich natural heritage of the Highlands Plateau.  The Foundation supports the Highlands Biological Station.  For more information about its events or to become a member, visit www.highlandsbiological.org or call (828) 526-2221.

Contributed by Michelle Ruigrok

 

 

Cashiers Antique Benefit Show

This beautiful vintage quilt with luscious giant  appliquéd strawberries will be the door prize at this year’s Cashiers Annual Benefit Show.

This beautiful vintage quilt with luscious giant
appliquéd strawberries will be the door prize at this year’s Cashiers Annual Benefit Show.

The 37th year of the Cashiers Annual Benefit Antiques Show will be under way July 19-21 at Blue Ridge School.

The show will abound with silver; jewelry; Oriental rugs; quilts; furniture; porcelains from Europe, Asia and the United States; all types of pottery from fanciful pieces of the Art Nouveau era to much coveted Southern and folk pottery.

If toys are your thing, you will find everything from toy soldiers to country toys to mechanical wonders. Beautiful vintage linens from the Victorian era to the 1940s will be available for every taste. Rare music boxes and fine barometers will be offered as well as their repair by experts.

Fine art will be available in the form of paintings, prints, and etchings. Fine framing is available as well. Do you have a keepsake or gift that you would like to have engraved? Hand engraving will be available on site for silver, gold, pewter etc. If you have chipped stemware that is in need of repair, on-site repair will be available, too.

You can spend all three days on one ticket and enjoy lunch every day with catered food and garden dining. A lovely vintage quilt will be given to some lucky attendee at the end of the show. Each paid attendee will receive a card to fill out for the drawing. Also available is a second quilt, which will be raffled for a scholarship to a deserving Blue Ridge School graduating senior.

Tickets will be available at the show and that quilt will be on display as well. Show tickets are available at the door and are available for a donation of $8.50 or $8 with any ad. Wheelchairs will be available for those who need assistance getting around the show and volunteers will be happy to assist.

Show dates are: Friday, July 19, and Saturday, July 20, 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.; and Sunday, July 21, 11:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. For questions, contact Hazel Giles at (828) 743-9270 or hzmamaw@frontier.com.

By Luke Osteen

 

Mountain Wildlife Days in Cashiers NC

The tenth annual Mountain Wildlife Days are scheduled for July 19 and 20 at the Sapphire Valley Resort.  Designed for all ages, this event is a unique opportunity for residents and visitors to this area to experience “wild lives and wild places” in an up close and personal way.

A wide variety of activities is provided to develop awareness and appreciation of some of the valued natural resources of our mountains. One of the featured presentations will be “An Evening with Bill Lea and His Inspiring Photography,” scheduled for 7:00 P.M. on Friday evening, July 19, at the Sapphire Valley Resort Community Center. Lea is a world-class nature photographer, wildlife advocate and black bear expert.  The evening will be dedicated to some of the best of his wildlife photographic images along with Lea’s commentary and stories set to a musical backdrop.

Throughout the day on Friday, July 19, a wide variety of outdoor programs are scheduled including:  a bird walk with the Highlands Plateau Audubon Society, hikes led by experienced outdoor experts, a trip to the new facilities at Gorges State Park an outdoor nature program for children and other activities to be announced.

On Saturday, July 20, the entire day will be devoted to developing awareness and appreciation of wildlife.  Programs will include Rob Gudger’s very popular live wolves, Pete Kipp and his exciting peregrine falcons, Steve O’Neil and his outstanding presentation featuring reptiles, amphibians and other small mammals. Also, the North Georgia Zoo’s “Wildlife Wonders” will showcase some of their unique animals.

In addition, a silent auction is a part of Mountain Wildlife Days’ effort to provide financial assistance for wildlife outreach programming for local schools and organizations. This event is co-sponsored by the Sapphire Valley Resort and financially supported by sponsors and “friends of wildlife.”  For more information and a detailed schedule call or visit the Sapphire Valley Resort’s Community Center, (828) 743-7663.

Contributed by John Edwards

 

Annual Bazaar And Auctions in Cashiers NC

A year’s worth of treasures will be unveiled at the Church of the Good Shepherd’s annual Bazaar and Auctions on July 12 and 13.

The Church of the Good Shepherd (Highway 107 South across from High Hampton) will hold its annual Bazaar and Auctions on July 12th and 13th.  The fun begins with silent and live auctions at the church on Friday, July 12.  Viewing and bidding on silent auction items lasts from 2:00 until 6:15 P.M.  A reception with hors d’oeuvres begins at 5:00 P.M. Cost is $5.  Silent auction items showcase gift certificates, original oil paintings, beautiful lamps, quilts, designer handbags, fine furniture, and a model replica of America 1851, the schooner winning the first America Cup.

The live auction begins at 6:30 P.M. A few of the many items up for bid are a Florida Panhandle weekend vacation for six, renowned chefs’ private dinners and cocktail parties for you and your friends, a pig roast, a fly fishing outing, a luncheon cruise on Mountaintop’s “Mirabella,” and unique artwork from a well-known local artist.  The auctions are chaired by Doreen Hastings and Bob Starkey.

On Saturday, the bazaar will be held at the Cashier’s Community Center on Highway 64 West near Wendy’s.  The bazaar begins at 9:00 A.M. For early shoppers lining up at 8:00 A.M., a breakfast of sausage biscuits, coffee, and orange juice can be purchased.  Hamburgers, hot dogs, chips, drinks, and brownies will be available for lunch.

Plan to spend time rummaging through all the departments.  Items have been collected all year and stored for this event.  In the gymnasium and under the tents you’ll find antiques, artwork, baskets, books, bric-a-brac, children’s items, furniture, garden and patio items, kitchenware, linens, hand-made pottery, sporting goods, and delicious prepared foods for you to take home.  More than 150 volunteers work on this event chaired by Carol Treichel and Daryl Shankland.

All proceeds of the bazaar and auctions go to outreach to serve the less fortunate in our community.  Some of the many agencies who benefit are the Free Dental Clinic, Glenville-Cashiers Rescue Squad and Fire Department, Jackson County Council on Aging, Fishes and Loaves, and area schools.

Contributed by Janie Crews

 

 

Cashiers Designer Showhouse™

The Cashiers Designer Showhouse™ runs from August 17 through September 1.

The Cashiers Designer Showhouse™ runs from August 17 through September 1.

The 2013 Cashiers Designer Showhouse™ beckons you “to come and stay awhile.” Perched atop Riley Mountain, the high country estate of Serenity Acres is exactly what the name implies – a respite from the fast pace of life.

As Kathleen Rivers, chair of this year’s event, says, “To me this property exemplifies all that is so special about the Cashiers Valley. The views are spectacular and the way the buildings nestle into the hillside makes the homes and the natural landscape flow together in a very special way.”

The original house and several acres were purchased in 1990 by George and Dorothy Bishop. Over time, more acreage was added, large stables were built, pastures were cleared, and a riding ring was completed.  Serenity Acres became a peaceful retreat and gathering place for the whole Bishop family.

From August 17 through September 1, visitors to the Cashiers Designer Showhouse™ will experience a much larger venue than in years past. They will have the opportunity to explore three stunningly decorated houses and the magnificent stables of Serenity Acres. They will enjoy shops filled with distinctive items as well as arts and crafts from the region presented by The Bascom: A Center for the Visual Arts. They will wander along walking trails, enjoy beautifully landscaped grounds and savor spectacular views.

Chair Kathleen Rivers invites each visitor to the 2013 Cashiers Designer Showhouse™ “to spend the day with us, discovering the entire property and delighting in the beauty and peace of Serenity Acres. Come, stay awhile and expect to be surprised.”

The Cashiers Designer Showhouse™ is the primary fundraiser of the Cashiers Historical Society, whose mission is preserving the heritage of Cashiers Valley through education, stewardship and advocacy. Admission is $25 a person. For further information about the Showhouse, contact the Cashiers Historical Society (828) 743-7710 or visit www.cashiershistoricalsociety.org.

Contributed by Claire Barry

 

Center for Life Enrichment in Highlands NC

The pleasure and excitement of exploring and learning continues in July as the Center for Life Enrichment (CLE) provides lectures and workshops in a wide variety of subjects. Almost all of the programs are offered in the newly opened lecture hall at the Peggy Crosby Center and registration is accomplished by a quick call to the central office at (828) 526-8811 or by accessing the website at www.clehighlands.com. A brochure with full information is available.

Right out of the chute and continuing until the end of the month are lectures to attract everyone’s interest. Justin Railsback, a Ph.D. candidate at Northwestern University in energy nanomaterials, will peel this onion to present the nanomaterials that are revolutionizing our lives. From fibers 100 times stronger than steel, to targeted drugs to treat cancer and repair spinal cords, to solar cells, we will be informed of the miracles in nanotechnology. The Scale of Things to Come: A Small Visit with Nanotechnology. (7/2, 2:oo – 4:00 P.M.)

No introduction is needed for Coach Vince Dooley of the University of Georgia, who will present Vince Dooley Speaks about College Football and its Role and Position in Higher Education. (7/9, 6:00 – 8:00 P.M.).

For the garden enthusiasts, there are four presentations: “Let’s Grow Daffodils” (7/2; 10:00 A.M. –noon), “Garden in Spite of Shade –‘Efil, Doog’” (7/19; 2:00 – 4:00 P.M.), “Birding Beyond Borders” (7/25; 2:00 – 4:00 P.M.).

Programs on Music are “James Joyce’s Chamber Music” (7/13; 10:00 A.M. to noon), “Genius Comes in Many Colors” (7/20; 10:00 A.M. to noon) and “Jazz Meets Classics” (7/27, 10:00 A.M. to noon). These programs are on Saturday to accommodate the week-ender. They are in conjunction with the Chamber Music Festival Series at the Performing Arts Center.  James Flannery, Ph.D., Sidney Perkowitz, Ph.D., and Dwight Andrews, Ph.D. are the distinguished musicians and professors who will present.

In the categorny of Art and Architecture , Colin Mackey will tell us about “Clint Eastwood” (7/8, 4:00 – 6:00 P.M.) followed by the Eastwood: movie,“Unforgiven” (7/8, 7:00 – 9:00 P.M.).

An intergenerational experience presented by Chef Johannes Klapdohr of Old Edwards Inn and Spa Culinary Arts will take place on July 16 (10:00 A.M. – 2:00 P.M.).  “Harvest and Cooking at the Farm” will be a great event for children, parents and grandparents to experience together the joys of the garden to table culinary trend.

And last but not least, CLE is presenting “Spirituality in Art” (7/25, 4:00 – 5:00 P.M.), in conjunction with Steven Aimone’s exhibit of Southern Lights at The Bascom.

Cullowhee Mountain Arts

If you haven’t heard about Cullowhee Mountain ARTS yet, now is the time to take a look at this ambitious new arts organization – bringing summer programming to adults and youth, right here in our backyard!

Imagine yourself in a studio where other artists are exploring innovative, multimedia printmaking methods or making photograms using the sun, learning about slabs and extrusions, forming pots with a closer look to function and detail, learning plein air painting surrounded by majestic mountains and summer botanicals, or making books filled with memoir and stitches. Imagine that you will be sharing ideas and meals and outings with other artists from around the country. At Cullowhee Mountain ARTS, you will find a like-minded community of passionate learners, energized by wonderful instructors where daily concerns are left behind.

The 2013 Summer ARTS Series, through July 27, will bring a distinguished faculty with national and international reputations who will teach twenty artist workshops, in painting, printmaking, book arts, ceramics, photography, mixed media and sculpture. The workshops provide a five-day immersion experience supplemented with lectures, demonstrations, or portfolio talks. Instruction and sharing among artists take place within the $30 million Bardo Arts Center, opened to academic use in January 2005. Of the complex’s approximately 76,000 square feet, approximately 46,000 square feet is utilized for visual art programs including the Fine Art Museum.

Youth programs include, two- and five-day art camps, a week-long “Clay Works” workshop for all ages, Saturday morning family art days, and a Teen Workshop, taught by sculptor Judy Richardson, who built the peaches in the movie “James and the Giant Peach.”  The lectures, demonstrations, or portfolio talks are open to the public.

In concert with the Summer ARTS Series, The Fine Art Museum at Western Carolina University is hosting the 2013 Cullowhee Mountain Arts faculty invitational, through July 26. The exhibit features the work of 19 contemporary artists working throughout the United States. Expect an invigorating compilation of art in a multitude of mediums.

Enrollment is open for most workshops and youth programs www.cullowheemountainarts.org to find out more, or call (828) 342-6913. Cullowhee Mountain ARTS office is located at 598 West Main Street in Sylva, North Carolina.

Contributed by Myriah Strivelli

 

 

Scaly Mountain Women’s Club Auction

The Annual Scaly Women’s Club auction will be held on Saturday, July 13, at 7:00 P.M.  in the community room of the Scaly Mountain Fire Department.

The Annual Scaly Women’s Club auction will be held on Saturday, July 13, at 7:00 P.M.
in the community room of the Scaly Mountain Fire Department.

The much anticipated tenth annual Scaly Women’s Club auction will be held on Saturday, July 13, at 7:00 P.M. in the community room of the Scaly Mountain Fire Department. If you are interested in getting some great buys, and at the same time, helping out the area’s college and trade school students, this is your venue. Come as early as 6:00 P.M. to check out the items to be auctioned, while enjoying complimentary wine and cheese. Hot dogs, chips, desserts and soft drinks will also be sold. All of the money that is raised goes back into the community, with the majority of it being used for scholarships.

There will be raffles and a silent auction as well as the live auction with Brian Snyder of Clayton. Some of the items being auctioned are: golf outings at several area clubs, gift certificates to local restaurants, items donated by Highlands, Dillard and Clayton merchants, antiques, two quilts, and a myriad of other items. If you have something special that you would like to donate, or have other questions, please call Pat Leaptrot at (828) 526-9387.

The location of the Fire Department is on Hale Ridge Road, which turns off of Dillard Road by the outdoor center in the middle of Scaly. Look for the auction signs. See you there!

Contributed by Margie Spraggins

 

Annual Patriotic Concert

First Presbyterian Church will present the annual patriotic concert at 8:0o P.M. on Thursday, July 4. The free concert will last approximately 45 minutes, ensuring plenty of time to watch the town fireworks display.

Featured will be Dave Landis, bagpipes; Larry Black, trumpet; Angie Jenkins, pipe organ; and the Highlands Male Chorus under the direction of Joe Powell, with Carol Guise as accompanist.

Come dressed as you are. In the event the fireworks display is cancelled due to rain, the concert will still take place. The church is located at 471 Main Street. Handicapped entrances are located on Church Street and on Fifth Street.

 

Sagee Manor Gardens Tour

Sagee Mountain Garden Tours in Highlands NC

Sagee Mountain Garden Tours in Highlands NC

The Cutting Garden, the White Garden, the Sunken Garden, Woodland Garden, and the crown jewel, the Rosemary Verey

Sagee Mountain Garden Tours

Sagee Mountain Garden Tours

Garden, are but a few of the gardens included in the Sagee Manor garden tours at the Highlands home of Cathy and Bob Fisher on two Saturdays, July 20 and July 27.  In years past and again in 2013, the Fishers have graciously invited the public to walk the garden paths and admire the beauty of the hundreds of flowers on their property.  Historically the tours have raised more than $60,000 for funding the outreach programs of the Episcopal Church of the Incarnation in Highlands and their mission and church in Haiti.
Sagee Manor is home to one of the finest gardens in the Southeast and features mainly native plants. For tickets to the tour contact the Church of the Incarnation office at (828) 526-2968 for reservations, or you may access the Episcopal Church of the Incarnation website (incarnationwnc.org) if you wish to purchase tickets using a credit card. Tickets are also available at the church office Monday through Friday.  The cost per person is $30.  Tour times for both dates, Saturdays, July 20 and July 27 are 10:00 A.M., 11:00 A.M., noon, and 1:00 P.M.

 

 

Cover Artist Amy Sullivan

coverarticle2coverarticlecoverart3There be giants out there… gargantuan lumbering beasts that pose and posture over the landscape and groan in the wind. They have seen seasons, and sometimes centuries come and go. They have told their tales about Rock City and Ruby Falls. And they beckon fine artist Amy Sullivan to memorialize their stories in pigment and wax.
It is no wonder Sullivan, a native North Carolinian, anthropomorphizes these giant barns.  She sees them as big, soulful old creatures with fascinating forms in out-of-square frames that define their personalities. She says, “It’s their idiosyncrasies, their decay, weathered texture, leaning supports and bowed rooftops that fascinate me. I can’t wait to capture their abstracted essence on canvas.”
But before you can paint one of these beasties, you must first find it, and that is one of the most satisfying parts of the process for Sullivan. “When I am in search mode, I hit the back roads, meandering down rural lanes, stopping when an old barn peaks on the horizon. I pull over and tromp through a field to get photographs. Once, in Italy, a rabbit hunter’s rifle shots sliced the air around my head.”
Why didn’t that cure her of barn stalking? She laughs, “Somehow the thrill of the pursuit overpowers my fear of an errant bullet… or bull.”
Photos taken, she hurries them back to her studio to preview on her computer. She selects the most interesting, and then the painting begins. “I start with a small palm-sized study in oil and wax to work out composition and palette,” she says.
Then she spreads a coat of room-temperature beeswax on a gessoed birch board upon which she layers wax blended with oil paints. The challenge of working with wax and pigment is mastering the temperature shifts. Hurry, heat, push the materials, pull them, heat them again, cool them, stabilize them, soften them, all the while manipulating the color, wet-into-wet, adjusting the opaqueness. The final phase is delineating the edges, using contrast to make areas advance and recede. It is a kinesthetic, Zen process, and for Sullivan, a very satisfying one in spite of its mercurial nature.
When heat-set for the final time, the old barn’s spirit glows with a magical, ethereal translucence ordinary oils could not capture.
Locally, Sullivan’s work can be viewed at John Collette Fine Art, 104 Highway 107 South in Cashiers. Or you can visit her website: amysullivanfineart.com. She also shows in galleries in Santa Fe, New Mexico and Charleston, South Carolina. Contact John Collette for more information, (828) 743-7977 or e-mail Sullivan at: amyartistry@aol.com.
by Donna Rhodes

Fete of Clay

feature4feature3Since the Woman of Willendorf, created some 25,000 years ago, the female form has been the star around which all the arts orbit. Figurative work, particularly the feminine, dominates painting, sculpture, literature, and dance. So it is no surprise Barbara DeMaire, contemporary sculptor, focuses on the feminine form.
Each pose of DeMaire’s figures reflects a poised, self-confident presence with which viewers can identify and imbue with their own life story. DeMaire says, “These girls come from my heart. They please me. If a piece connects with someone else, then that is one more layer of happiness for me.”
She adds, “I am enchanted with the process of molding clay into appealing poses. High-end fashion magazines are a great resource and inspiration for my girls.” DeMaire’s shapes, expressions, curves, and textures emerge from the earthenware clay in delightful gestural expressions. Bodies leaping, sitting, standing, stretching, or lying prone are adorned with flowing drapes and graceful folds of fabric, complimenting the line and form of the figure.
Because DeMaire is a yoga devotee, she is in tune with the fluidity of the human body. Couple that anatomical knowledge with her exceptional talent and a lifelong love of sculptural form, and it is no wonder her passion grew and blossomed. A few sculpture classes here and there, solid support from her family, and connections to the Museum of Fine Arts in St. Petersburg, Florida and The Bascom in Highlands, provided her with all she needed to launch her work. She has shown in Summit One Gallery and John Collette Fine Art in Highlands and Cashiers, and is currently showing at Vincent William Gallery in St. Pete Beach, New Bern ArtWorks in New Bern, North Carolina, and Ann Jacob Gallery in Highlands.
But the real turning point from doing the work for personal satisfaction to sharing it with the public came when Wesley Wofford, Emmy and Academy Award winning sculptor from Cashiers, sang her work’s praises and encouraged her to show. She recently took a class with him at The Bascom and found the experience illuminating. Whether she is studying with the masters, or simply holding herself to her own high standards, her work continues to rise to a level of excellence to which we all aspire.
To learn more about DeMaire’s process, her show schedule, gallery showings and more, visit her website at www.barbarademaire.com, or call (727) 580-4570.

by Donna Rhodes

Bascom News

“I like for my students to have fun and learn during our endeavors together,” says P. Knight Martorell, instructor for Considering the Unexpected Beauty, a two-week drawing workshop at The Bascom on Mondays and Tuesdays, July 1, 2, 8 and 9.

“The  course is a working exploration, through drawing, into the question of ‘what is beauty.’ The creations that I find most engaging cause me to see or experience something differently.  I believe that is the function of art: to initiate a dialogue within the viewer.”

Martorell’s class is one of several offered in July that will expand your knowledge and creativity. Check out and sign up for the following:

Botanical Watercolor: Instructor: Linda Fraser. Saturdays, July 6, 13, 20, 27. Explore various perspectives of different scenes.

Hypertufa: Instructor: Les Williams. Sunday, July 14. A cement-based, manufactured material is the medium for  planters and carvings students will create in  class.

The Dynamic Plein Air Landscape: Instructor: John MacDonald. Monday to Friday, July 15 to 19. Compose your own landscape painting in the studio and outdoors, using a  19th-century process.

Highlands Landscape Photography: Instructor: Benjamin Dimmitt. Monday to Friday, July 20 to August 2.  Bring a scene to life through professional techniques, including Photoshop and Lightroom software.

Mountains in Bloom:

Thursday, July 11 through Sunday, July 14 – enjoy activities and attractions that make up this popular annual event: luncheon and lecture by Kathryn Greeley, author of The Collected Tabletop; tours of featured private gardens Friday and Saturday, including luncheon served both days on The Bascom terrace;  flower show exhibits throughout the campus, as well as  exhibitions in the main gallery spaces, always free; and a benefactor-only dinner on Sunday at The Farm at Old Edwards Inn, when Robert Balentine, CEO of Balentine, event sponsor, will present the coveted Balentine Award.  Mark your calendar and secure your tickets early! For more information call (828) 282-2882.

Southern Lights Exhibition Continues:

Don’t miss this show of collaborative work by four Southern artists whose works are inspired by the region they have in common. Charlotte Foust, Martica Griffin, Krista Harris and Audrey Phillips explore their media to interpret what it means to be “Southern.” Through September 1.

The Bascom is open year-round, Monday through Saturday, 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. and Sunday, noon to 5:00 P.M.  Enjoy workshops, exhibitions, special events, programs and the unique Shop. For more information visit www.TheBascom.org or call (828) 526-4949.

Contributed by Pat Turnbull

 

 

Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music Festival

The Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music Festival is offering a glorious 2013 season, welcoming favorite performers from seasons past and making way for new artists already earning an international reputation.stretching from June 28 through August 11.

“Highlights will include the festival debut of the dashing young Concertmaster of the Atlanta Symphony, David Coucheron, and his talented sister pianist Julie,” says Artistic Director Dr. William Ransom. “Other newcomers include English flutist Anthony Reiss in a program entitled ‘The Magic Flute’ and clarinetist Roeland Hendrikx from Belgium.

“It wouldn’t be summer without The Eroica Trio, and they will be joined by special guests in ‘Eroica Plus!’ The Vega Quartet will be back, and we will have some fun with another ‘Jazz Meets Classics’ concert featuring, this time, the saxophone, with Dwight Andrews. The Festival Chamber Orchestra will once again close the season at our final Gala with Mozart’s extraordinary
‘Sinfonia Concertante.’”

Concerts will be held at 6:00 P.M. Fridays at the Martin-Lipscomb Performing Arts Center in Highlands and repeated at 5:00 P.M. Saturdays at the Albert Carlton-Cashiers Community Library in Cashiers. Sunday concerts will be staged at 5:00 P.M. at the Performing Arts Center in Highlands and repeated at 5:00 P.M. Mondays at the Cashiers Community Library.

With all that talent, the Highlands Cashiers Chamber Music Festival can’t help but spill out into the
twin communities.

You can join the Smoky Mountain Brass Quintet for a free concert on Saturday, July 6, from 3:00 to 5:00 P.M. at Town Square on Main Street in Highlands.

The Vega Quartet will offer the free Bach at Buck’s at Buck’s Coffee Cafe on Main Street in Highlands at 8:00 P.M. Wednesday, July 17. They’ll also perform at 8:00 P.M. Wednesday, July 24, at Buck’s at the Crossroads in Cashiers. Bach at Buck’s is as natural a combination as, well, rich coffee and warm, mellow notes.

In addition to its nationally-recognized program of concerts, the Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music Festival is laced with a series of Feasts of the Festival. They’re a chance to meet fascinating people and enjoy marvelous food and drink in some of the most breathtaking homes in Western North Carolina. Feasts continue through September and will feature an irresistible series of locations and menus.

For more information about the festival and its full lineup of performances and events, visit www.h-cmusicfestival.org or call (828) 526-9060.

By Luke Osteen

 

 

Betsy Paul Art Raffle

The winner of the July art raffle benefitting the Cashiers-Glenville Fire Department will take home a gorgeous original oil painting, “Looking Glass Falls” created by Velda Lovell and donated by Graham and Greta Somerville.

Velda specializes in oil and prefers to paint landscapes.  She has won many awards and has her own gallery, the Blue Valley Gallery, located in the Mountain Laurel Shoppes on Slabtown Road.  She also conducts art classes at her gallery.  For more information about her gallery and/or art classes, call Velda at (828) 743-2956.

Viewers are invited to see each month’s raffle item on display from 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M., Monday through Saturday at Betsy Paul Properties, 870 Highway 64 West, Cashiers, North Carolina. Checks can also be mailed directly to the Cashiers-Glenville Fire Department, P.O. Box 713, Cashiers, North Carolina, 28717. For more information contact Betsy Paul Properties, (828) 743-0880.

Art League of Highlands

Artist Mase Lucas will speak July 29.

Artist Mase Lucas will speak July 29.

July is a busy month for the Art League of Highlands.  The Summers Colors show, the first of the League’s two annually-sponsored fine arts shows, will be held from noon until 6:00 P.M. Friday, July 19, and from 10:00 A.M. until 5:00 P.M. Saturday, July 20 at the Recreation Park.

Admission is free, and attendees will be treated to the works of more than 50 talented regional artists.  Random gift certificates toward the purchase of artwork will be awarded to some lucky attendees, and on Saturday, there will be a children’s art room where young aspiring artists can create pieces to take home, and perhaps also take home a free painting from one of the exhibiting artists.

Paintings of oil, acrylic and watercolor will be on display, as well as mixed media pieces, photographs, sculpture, hand-fashioned jewelry and woodturnings, all of which is original art.  This is an excellent opportunity to view the work of and meet some truly talented artists.

Also free and open to the public, is its July 29 at 5:00 P.M. meeting in the terrace of the Bascom.  The featured speaker will be Mase Lucas, an artist well known for her contemporary equine paintings, who has also produced remarkable abstract paintings.

Her education includes the School of Visual Arts, New York and The Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore.  Her career began in 1972 in Provincetown, Massachusetts, where she resided until 1982.  In 1983 she relocated to South Beach, Florida and was a founding member of the South Florida Art Center.  It was then that she started showing in national festivals and other juried exhibitions.  In 1991, Ms. Lucas moved to Western North Carolina and has continued to show nationally.

She has been honored to serve as a peer juror, and her work has appeared in numerous solo and group events and exhibitions, earning her many first place and best in show awards in a career that has spanned over 25 years.  Her paintings are to be found in private and municipal collections in the U.S, Canada and abroad.

Contributed by Zach Claxton

 

 

The Highlands Playhouse

The Tony-Award winning musical comedy “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” comes to the Highlands Playhouse July 4 through July 20. This is a hilarious tale of overachievers’ angst chronicling the experience of six adolescent outsiders competing for the spelling championship of a lifetime.

“Spelling Bee” is a musical comedy that follows six young people in the throes of puberty. These pubescents are overseen by grown-ups who barely managed to escape childhood themselves, learn that winning isn’t everything and that losing doesn’t necessarily make you a loser.

Spelling Bee started as a non-musical play entitled “C-R-E-P-U-S-C-U-L-E,” done by the improvisational group The Farm. It was conceived by Rebecca Feldman with music and lyrics by William Finn and Book by Rachel Sheinkin. The musical fictional spelling bee is set in a geographically ambiguous Putnam Valley Middle School where the adolescents compete in the Bee run by three equally-quirky adults.

Spelling Bee’s talented cast features Samantha Pauly as Rona Lisa Peretti, Bill Patti as VP Panch, Emmanuel Davis as Mitch Mahoney, Annabelle Fox as Olive, Kacey Willis as Marcy, Rachel Schimenti as Logainne, Jimmy Lewis as Barfee, Noah Berry as Leaf and Nigel Huckle as Chip.  Spelling Bee will be directed by Nicole Perrone, choreographed by Brieanna Bailey and musical direction will be provided by daMon Goff. The creative team also includes Alex Van K as Set Designer, Mark Maruschak as Lighting Designer and Casey Rattz as Costume Designer. Spelling Bee is recommended for audiences 13 and over.

A special meet the cast party of Spelling Bee will be held in the Sequoia Room of Highlands Inn on Monday, July 8 from 6:00 to 8:00 P.M. Tickets are $50 per person and include heavy Hors d’oeuvres and wine.

The Highlands Playhouse is located at 362 Oak Street. Individual tickets are $30 for adults and $12 for children 12 and under. Show times are Tuesday – Saturday at 8 pm and Sunday Matinees at 2:00 P.M. To order tickets, call the Box Office at (828) 526-2695 or email highlandsplayhouse@yahoo.com.

Visit the new Highlands Playhouse website at www.highlandsplayhouse.org.

Contributed by Chesley Owens

 

Bluegrass at Highlands PAC

The Dappled Grays

The Dappled Grays (pictured) go banjo to
banjo against Nitrograss in a Bluegrass Duel
on Saturday, June 6.

The perfect way to top off your July 4th Weekend is with the return of the Bluegrass Duel on Saturday, July 6, at 8:00 P.M.  This year The Duel will feature Highlands’ own Nitrograss and Atlanta’s The Dappled Grays.

Nitrograss  sprung to life from the heart of the rural Appalachians with one singular mission: to take the Bluegrass world by storm, and with a deadly force.

The percussive banjo of two-time national champion Charles Wood lays the foundation for the band’s unique style.  Charles’ playing is melodic in its sensibility, evoking strong inflections with pure, driving syncopation.  Next is the lock-chop of Caleb Hanks’ mandolin;  Micah Hanks offers an intuitive array of acoustic guitar parts, with the two brothers layering their strong vocal harmonies over a mix in a sonic separation. Finally, the back-beat of Dakota “Smoky” Waddell’s bass lines pushes the music of this Southeastern powerhouse into a foray beyond the frontiers most acoustic musicians dare travel.

The Dappled Grays was founded by Mandolinist Michael Smith and guitarist Casey Cook in 1999 as an outlet for performing original instrumental music.

In 2005 the band brought in the vocal talents of Leah Calvert which took the band into a new musical direction.  Also, banjoist Greg Earnest and bassist Keith Morris were added.

In January 2007, the band released its second album “Doin’ My Job.” The album made it to No. 12 on the national Bluegrass Music charts.

Highlands PAC is located on Chestnut Street in Highlands.  Reserve your seats by calling (828) 526-9047  or online at www.highlandspac.org.

Contributed by Mary Adair Leslie

 

 

Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music’s Salon at Six

Playwright Alfred Uhry

Playwright Alfred Uhry

Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music Festival is offering a wonderful evening to complement its dynamic 32nd season.

Salon at Six will be staged from 5:30 to 7:00 P.M. Thursday, July 11, at the home of Bob and Olivia Holt. It will feature wine and light hors d’oeuvres. Centerpiece of the evening is playwright Alfred Uhry, who will speak on “Music and Me.”

Uhry is distinguished as the only American playwright to have won a Pulitzer Prize, an Academy Award and two Tony Awards. A graduate of Brown University, Uhry began his professional career as a lyric writer under contract to the late Frank Loesser. In that capacity, he made his Broadway debut in 1968 with “Here’s Where I Belong.” His first major success came when he collaborated with Robert Waldman on a musical adaptation of Eudora Welty’s “The Robber Bridegroom,” which opened at the Mark Taper Forum in 1976 and went on to Broadway, winning Mr. Uhry his first Tony nomination. He followed that with five re-created musicals at the Goodspeed Opera House. His first play, “Driving Miss Daisy” opened at Playwrights Horizons Theatre in New York in 1987. It moved subsequently to the John Houseman Theatre where it ran for three years and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1988. The film version, starring Morgan Freeman and Jessica Tandy, won the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay in 1990. The film also won the Best Picture Award. His next play, “The Last Night of Ballyhoo,” was commissioned by the Cultural Olympiad for the 1996 Atlanta Olympics. It opened on Broadway the next year where it ran for over 500 performances and won Uhry the Outer Critics Circle Award, the Drama League Award and the 1997 Tony Award for Best Play.

Uhry is also the borther of Highlands Chamber Music Festival board member Ann
Uhry Abrams.

For reservations or more information about the Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music Festival’s 32nd season, call (828) 526-9060.

 

Twenty-First Bel Canto Recital

Heather Witt

Heather Witt

 

Alex Richardson

Alex Richardson

 

Sarah Jane McMahon

Sarah Jane McMahon

 

Nelson Martinez

Nelson Martinez

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In honor of Richard Joel, founder of the Bel Canto Recital over twenty years ago, the 21st annual recital will again be a quartet of singers – soprano, mezzo-soprano, tenor and baritone.  Richard died peacefully in his sleep last April 15 at the age of 96 at his home in

Tallahassee, Florida.

Returning will be soprano Sarah Jane McMahon who wowed the audience in 2010.  She was hailed by the New York Times as “bright, active, and fastidiously musical,” and by Opera News as having “a golden sound,” She is a frequent guest artist at New York City Opera, and has also performed at Carnegie Hall and Avery Fisher Hall.  She has recorded an album of sacred music entitled, “I Thank My God,” as well as a Christmas album, “Night of Silence.”

Heather Witt is described as one of the most promising young mezzo-sopranos of the Southeast. The Atlanta Journal Constitution told audiences “she is the kind of singer you hope to hear – talented, alert, a singer with a future.”  Her experience spans both musical theatre and classical. She has been heard in productions in the United States as well as in Italy and participated in St Petersburg Opera’s Emerging Artist Program. Ms. Witt won first place in the Bauru Atlanta Competition and is excited to be making her South American debut this year.

Alex Richardson, tenor, was described by Opera News as an artist who “summoned forth vocal luminescence” in his performances as Count Vaudémont in Tchaikovsky’s “Iolanta.”  He was also tenor soloist in Beethoven’s Choral Fantasy with the Boston Symphony at the Tanglewood 75th Anniversary Gala.  He has appeared in concert at Carnegie Hall and Avery Fisher Hall, among other venues and was honored by the Metropolitan Opera Council Auditions and the Licia Albanese-Puccini Foundation.

Born in Cuba, baritone Nelson Martinez began his Operatic career at the age of 19 singing to great praise and critical success throughout opera houses around the world in a variety of Italian and French Operas as well as Cuban and Spanish Zarzuelas.  In 2001, Nelson moved to the United States where he has continued his operatic career performing with a number of regional opera companies.  His appearances have taken him to opera houses in Spain, France, China, Russia, Korea, Colombia, Mexico and Guatemala.

As always the concert will be followed by a wonderful dinner held at Highlands Country Club. Of course, as he has since Bel Canto’s inception, Stephen Dubberly will accompany the performers and will also perform a solo piano piece.  The solicitation letter will be mailed in early July to those who have attended Bel Canto in the past.  These past benefactors will be able to buy tickets early to assure themselves of seats at the always sold out performance.

In the past 21 years Bel Canto has supported The Bascom Permanent Collection, Highlands School music program (with its new choral groups) and the Highlands Community Child Development Center.  In the last ten years alone Bel Canto has donated over $250,000 to our three beneficiaries.

So put Sunday, September 8, on your calendar now and plan to attend the 21st Annual Bel Canto Recital!  To contact Bel Canto and get on the mailing list, please call (828) 526-5213 or e-mail highlandsbelcanto@gmail.com.  You can also  mail your contact information to Bel Canto Recital, P.O. Box 2392, Highlands, NC 28741.

Contributed by Janet Grantham

 

 

Highlands, a Small Town ArtPlace

With its bustling art galleries, and vibrant The Bascom Center for Visual Arts, it’s pretty clear that Highlands is a community in love with the arts.

You needn’t look any further than the pages of this month’s Laurel to realize that art plays a big part in the town’s social and economic landscape.

From the very beginning, Highlands was attracting artists and artisans and those who viewed the world a little differently. Perhaps it was some alchemy between the plateau’s natural heritage and that pioneer spirit, but somehow artists have always had a place in Highlands.

That’s why it really isn’t surprising that ArtPlace has named the town one of the Top 12 Small-Town ArtPlaces in America.

ArtPlace is a collaboration of leading national and regional foundations, banks, and federal agencies committed to accelerating creative placemaking — putting the arts at the heart of a portfolio of strategies designed to revitalize communities.

“Earlier this year, ArtPlace announced America’s Top Twelve ArtPlaces in major metropolitan areas — vibrant communities identified as being exceptionally successful in combining the arts, artists, and venues for creativity and expression with independent businesses, restaurants, and a walkable lifestyle,” said ArtPlace Director Carol Coletta. “It is equally important to recognize and celebrate dynamic Small-Town ArtPlaces and the unique qualities that make them well worth the journey to explore and enjoy.”

To identify those little communities, ArtPlace hired Impresa, a firm specializing in the study of regional economics.  Impresa plowed through reams of data and surveyed thousands of towns, looking for those that had the highest concentrations of arts non-profits, core arts-oriented businesses, and workers in creative occupations. The towns selected had the highest scores in the country.

And, of course, that’s how Highlands ended up on this exclusive list.

“The first thing I noticed about Highlands is its huge variety of cultural arts offerings: from The Bascom to the arts galleries on Main Street to the performing arts theatres and companies to the Chamber Music Festival!,” says The Bascom Executive Director Jane Jerry.  “I’m always impressed that there are so many arts opportunities for children and youth as well as adults. We are very proud that The Bascom’s new campus was cited as an anchor for Highlands’ designation as one of the top 12 small town ArtPlaces.”

by Luke Osteen

 

What is Bluegrass Music?

Just what is bluegrass music?  Seems everyone has their own idea about what a particular genre of music should sound like or what elements place it in a particular category.

Bluegrass music has become more mainstream within popular culture particularly over the past 10 to 15 years.  Some would say if the music played consists of a banjo, mandolin, fiddle, doghouse bass, guitar, and or dobro, it’s bluegrass.  Others would say that it’s not necessarily the instruments that are played, but what is played on them.  Some may identify a stereotypical style or sound such as whiny singing or the speed or meter of the music.  Well, truthfully one can break bluegrass down into two styles, traditional and contemporary.

Trying to find an accurate history of the evolution of bluegrass can also render debate.  However, I’ll share with you what is generally accepted among musical historians.  Bluegrass is thought of as uniquely American with influences on style and instrumentation coming from around the world. The pinnacle development of  old time time music and delta blues culminated  to produce early bluegrass music in the 1920s and 1930s. The music reflects primarily rural themes of the common folk and is most certainly a grassroots  artistic expression. No pun intended.

A host of personalities too many to list in this article, are attributed to the early development of our modern bluegrass sound.  Bill Monroe is often called the father of bluegrass, but Lester Flatt, Earl Scruggs, Jimmy Martin, Charlie Monroe, Carter and Ralph Stanley and many others also deserve credit. However,  the term bluegrass does come from “Bill Monroe and the Blue Grass Boys.”  Over the years many personalities and groups continue to make their contributions to the bluegrass style. One may recognize more recent artists such as Alison Krauss, Tony Rice,  Bela Fleck , Sam Bush, Blue Highway, Boxcars, and  yes, even Mumford and Sons are making a mark in contributions to bluegrass sound.  The number of great players professional and amateur is astounding and certainly bluegrass fans are some of the most loyal among music lovers.  If you wish to participate in a local bluegrass jam, Blue Ridge Music in Clayton, Georgia sponsors a monthly SEBA jam the first Saturday of every month from noon to 3:00 P.M.

Contributed by Tom Nixon

 

 

Randell Atcheson Returns to Highlands

Pianist/organist Randall Atcheson will headline a fundraiser for the  Highlands Community Child Development Center at 4:00 P.M. Saturday, July 20, at the Episcopal Church of the Incarnation.  There is no admission, but donations are welcome.

Pianist/organist Randall Atcheson will headline a fundraiser for the
Highlands Community Child Development Center at 4:00 P.M. Saturday, July 20, at the Episcopal Church of the Incarnation.
There is no admission, but donations are welcome.

Mark your calendars for 4:00 P.M. Saturday, July 20, for the performance of internationally-renowned pianist/organist Randall Atcheson.

What better way to support the Highlands Community Child Development Center in their annual fundraiser?  This year’s concert will be at the Episcopal Church of the Incarnation, located at 530 Main Street in Highlands. If you would like information on reserved seats or how to underwrite a portion of this concert, please call Nancy Bruns at (828) 226-1830.

The public is invited.  Admission is free but donations to the HCCDC are appreciated.

Atcheson grew up in Clanton, Alabama, a small town between Birmingham and Montgomery.  The son of a Baptist minister, he began playing church songs on his family’s upright piano at the age of five.  Soon thereafter he started lessons to expand his natural proficiency that became apparent early on.  At 12, Atcheson entered the School of Music at Samford University in Birmingham.   Following Samford, he continued his training at the Julliard School, where he was honored by being the only student in the history of the school to be allowed to pursue and receive simultaneous degrees in piano and organ performance.  He studied piano with the famed Sascha Gorodnitzki and organ with Anthony Newman.

Atcheson completed his 11th performance at Carnegie Hall in 2012.  With more than 16 albums, his music covers the spectrum of pop, sacred and classic love songs.  His exceptional musical talents have been enjoyed by music lovers on five continents.  Atcheson completed his eleventh performance at Carnegie Hall in 2012.   Venues have included Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris and Blenheim Palace, England, plus performances in Sydney, Australia; Jerusalem; Rio de Janeiro; and much more.

HCCDC offers children of working families the opportunity to learn with age-appropriate-curriculum    Children from age three months to five years are eligible to attend.

“The Center is a lifesaver,” a young mother says.  “With both me and my husband working, the center is our safety net.”

Parents of the approximately 66 children who attend the center work for 50 to 60 businesses in the community and depend on HCCDC. HCCDC is a North Carolina non-profit organization which relies on private donations and grants for 40 percent of the annual operating budget.

By Wiley Sloan

 

What’s Cookin’ at The Dog House

Roasted rack of lamb with sweet peppers and dandelion greens.

Roasted rack of lamb with sweet peppers and dandelion greens.

Enjoy a new spin on the “Bar Foods That You Love” in a casual atmosphere at The Dog

 The Dog House club sandwich.

The Dog House club sandwich.

 

Faces at the House: Owner Kay Craig, Executive Chef Adam Bresnahan  and assistant Adriana Olenic.

Faces at the House: Owner Kay Craig, Executive Chef Adam Bresnahan
and assistant Adriana Olenic.

House, located at the corner of Fourth and Spring Streets in Highlands.

New Executive Chef Adam Bresnahan is adding new items with ingredients from local producers. Adam has been cooking for 17 years. With a Bachelor of Science degree from Johnson Wales University, Bresnahan has honed his skills at restaurants in Chicago and in St. Thomas in the Virgin Islands before serving as sous chef at Madison’s here in Highlands.

He and the staff are creating daily specials that will become menu regulars along with the smoked wings, burgers, hot dogs, sandwiches, soups and salads that are so popular. For those seeking vegetarian options, there are going to be exciting additions to the menu.

The Dog House is a great place for families because of the wide array of menu items to choose from.  The outdoor seating also allows you to sit with your best four-legged friend and enjoy a drink and a meal together.

Each Thursday night bring your friends to The Dog House and enjoy their Low Country Boil — a hearty combination of shrimp and Dungeness crab, cooked with sausage, potatoes and corn and seasoned with Highlands Hickory Market Seasoning.

Sundays are special at The Dog House.  Sunday Brunch is served from 11:30 A.M. to 2:30 P.M.  Try the Poached Eggs and Ham with Fried Green Tomatoes or the Smoked Chicken Caesar on Flat Bread.  Satisfy your sweet tooth with the heavenly baked French Toast with Cinnamon and Vanilla, served with maple syrup and fresh fruit.  You can even create your own breakfast-a combination of eggs, bacon or sausage, pancakes or cheese grits.  Enjoy piping hot coffee or juice, or, for a lighter fare, try one of the delicious all fruit and ice cream smoothies.  After noon, enjoy a Mimosa, a Blood Mary or your favorite beer, wine or mixed drink.

Bresnahan will continue to infuse new menu items throughout the season.  He’ll incorporate seasonal items, fresh from the farm whenever possible.  You’ll want to stop in often to ensure that you don’t miss out on some of these innovative creations.   Stop by and say hello.

Don’t forget the Dog House is open from 11:30 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. Tuesday through Sunday, and Thursday, Friday and Saturday Nights from  5:00  to 9:00  P.M.  and is located at the corner of Fourth and Spring Streets at the top of Fourth Street Hill.  To-go orders are welcome and in-town delivery is available.

Looking for a place for a special celebration?  Call The Dog House at (828) 526-8364 to reserve space for your special event.

Good Wines Are Self Evident

The Fourth of July marks the birthday of our country as well as the death of the creator of the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson.   Jefferson was our country’s first oenophile, cultivated by his years of service as ambassador to France. He is responsible for bringing his love of wine in a tangible form via vitis vinifera, the European grapevine, to Monticello where he tried unsuccessfully to grow it for years. It would not be until years after the death of Jefferson and the discovery of phylloxera and the resultant grafting cure that the cultivation of the European wine grapes such as Chardonnay, Merlot, and Pinot Noir could flourish on American soil.  While in France, Jefferson travelled extensively to the vineyards, and his legacy survives at Chateau Haut-Brion in Bordeaux where visitors can still see where he signed the guest book.  Jefferson also made purchases for George Washington and John Adams, shipping the wines in barrels to the ports of Virginia. The sweet wine of Chateau d’Yquem was among the wines he bought for service in the White House.   Jefferson was not only a wine buyer; he also bought grapevines which were planted at Monticello in Virginia. Unfortunately, none of the vines ever produced enough of a crop to yield a vintage of Monticello wines. Ever the optimist, Jefferson never gave up his belief in the potential of American soil to yield great wines. The 1976 Judgment of Paris in which American wines trumped French wines in a blind tasting certainly was evidence enough that Jefferson’s vision had been achieved. What wines would Jefferson drink today? Here is a sampling of American classics that Jefferson would certainly approve: Octagon Meritage, Barboursville Vineyards, Virginia; Soter Vineyards, Mineral Springs Ranch Pinot Noir, Oregon; DARE by Viader, Cabernet Franc, Napa; Lail Vineyards, Blueprint Sauvignon Blanc; Pink Fiddle, Rosé of Pinot Noir, Fiddlehead Cellars, Santa Rita Hills, California; Pinot Gris Late, Sinskey Vineyards, Los Carneros, California; Kistler Chardonnay, Kistler Vineyard, Sonoma, California, and Nickel & Nickel, Merlot, Harris Vineyard, Oakville, California.

The Fourth of July marks the birthday of our country as well as the death of the creator of the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson.
Jefferson was our country’s first oenophile, cultivated by his years of service as ambassador to France. He is responsible for bringing his love of wine in a tangible form via vitis vinifera, the European grapevine, to Monticello where he tried unsuccessfully to grow it for years.
It would not be until years after the death of Jefferson and the discovery of phylloxera and the resultant grafting cure that the cultivation of the European wine grapes such as Chardonnay, Merlot, and Pinot Noir could flourish on American soil.
While in France, Jefferson travelled extensively to the vineyards, and his legacy survives at Chateau Haut-Brion in Bordeaux where visitors can still see where he signed the guest book.
Jefferson also made purchases for George Washington and John Adams, shipping the wines in barrels to the ports of Virginia. The sweet wine of Chateau d’Yquem was among the wines he bought for service in the White House.
Jefferson was not only a wine buyer; he also bought grapevines which were planted at Monticello in Virginia. Unfortunately, none of the vines ever produced enough of a crop to yield a vintage of Monticello wines.
Ever the optimist, Jefferson never gave up his belief in the potential of American soil to yield great wines. The 1976 Judgment of Paris in which American wines trumped French wines in a blind tasting certainly was evidence enough that Jefferson’s vision had been achieved.
What wines would Jefferson drink today?
Here is a sampling of American classics that Jefferson would certainly approve: Octagon Meritage, Barboursville Vineyards, Virginia; Soter Vineyards, Mineral Springs Ranch Pinot Noir, Oregon; DARE by Viader, Cabernet Franc, Napa; Lail Vineyards, Blueprint Sauvignon Blanc; Pink Fiddle, Rosé of Pinot Noir, Fiddlehead Cellars, Santa Rita Hills, California; Pinot Gris Late, Sinskey Vineyards, Los Carneros, California; Kistler Chardonnay, Kistler Vineyard, Sonoma, California, and Nickel & Nickel, Merlot, Harris Vineyard, Oakville, California.

The Fourth of July marks the birthday of our country as well as the death of the creator of the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson.

Jefferson was our country’s first oenophile, cultivated by his years of service as ambassador to France. He is responsible for bringing his love of wine in a tangible form via vitis vinifera, the European grapevine, to Monticello where he tried unsuccessfully to grow it for years.

It would not be until years after the death of Jefferson and the discovery of phylloxera and the resultant grafting cure that the cultivation of the European wine grapes such as Chardonnay, Merlot, and Pinot Noir could flourish on American soil.

While in France, Jefferson travelled extensively to the vineyards, and his legacy survives at Chateau Haut-Brion in Bordeaux where visitors can still see where he signed the guest book.

Jefferson also made purchases for George Washington and John Adams, shipping the wines in barrels to the ports of Virginia. The sweet wine of Chateau d’Yquem was among the wines he bought for service in the White House.

Jefferson was not only a wine buyer; he also bought grapevines which were planted at Monticello in Virginia. Unfortunately, none of the vines ever produced enough of a crop to yield a vintage of Monticello wines.

Ever the optimist, Jefferson never gave up his belief in the potential of American soil to yield great wines. The 1976 Judgment of Paris in which American wines trumped French wines in a blind tasting certainly was evidence enough that Jefferson’s vision had been achieved.

What wines would Jefferson drink today?

Here is a sampling of American classics that Jefferson would certainly approve: Octagon Meritage, Barboursville Vineyards, Virginia; Soter Vineyards, Mineral Springs Ranch Pinot Noir, Oregon; DARE by Viader, Cabernet Franc, Napa; Lail Vineyards, Blueprint Sauvignon Blanc; Pink Fiddle, Rosé of Pinot Noir, Fiddlehead Cellars, Santa Rita Hills, California; Pinot Gris Late, Sinskey Vineyards, Los Carneros, California; Kistler Chardonnay, Kistler Vineyard, Sonoma, California, and Nickel & Nickel, Merlot, Harris Vineyard, Oakville, California.

 

Six Healthy Ice Cream Recipes

Contributed by Dr. Anastasia Halldin, Nutrition Coach  www.healthymamainfo.com

Contributed by Dr. Anastasia Halldin, Nutrition Coach
www.healthymamainfo.com

Yes, “healthy” and “ice cream” can be used in one sentence.  “Tasty” can be used in the same sentence, too.  The following ice cream recipes are all sweet, creamy, and delicious, yet dairy-free and healthy.  They do not require you to use an ice-cream maker, just a high-speed blender. The consistency is like that of soft-serve ice cream. You have to serve these ice creams immediately as you make them so that they don’t melt.

Mint  Chocolate Chip
Avocado

Ingredients: 1 banana, sliced and frozen ; 1/2 teaspoon peppermint extract; 2 avocados, pits removed; 1/4  cup fresh mint leaves, diced; 1/4 cup dark chocolate chips

Directions: Blend the ingredients (except for the chocolate chips) together until smooth. Mix in the chips with a spoon.

Peach Soft-Serve

Ingredients: 2 bananas, sliced and frozen; 2 peaches, sliced and frozen

Directions: Blend together until smooth.

Strawberry Vanilla 

Ingredients: 2 bananas, sliced and frozen; 1/2 cup strawberries, frozen; 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Directions: Blend together until smooth.

Chocolate Peanut Butter

Ingredients: 2 bananas, sliced and frozen; 3 Tbsp organic peanut butter; 3 Tbsp raw unsweetened cocoa powder; 1 Medjool date

Directions: Blend together until smooth.

Cashew Vanilla 

Ingredients: 1 cup raw cashews, presoaked for minimum of 3 hours, soaking water discarded; 2 bananas, sliced and frozen; 1 pinch of salt; 2 tablespoons coconut oil; 1 Medjool date; 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Directions: Blend all ingredients together until smooth.

Butter-less Pecan 

Ingredients: 1 cup pecans, roughly chopped; 2 teaspoons maple syrup; 2 bananas, sliced and frozen; 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions: Preheat the oven to 300 degrees; Combine maple syrup with chopped pecans. Spread coated pecans on a parchment lined cookie sheet and toast for about an hour. Refrigerate for 20 minutes to an hour. Blend the bananas with vanilla extract until smooth. Mix in the pecans with a spoon.