Category Archives: Events in Highlands NC and Cashiers NC

highlands-chili-cook-off-onehighlands-chili-cook-off-sevenhighlands-chili-cook-off-sixhighlands-chili-cook-off-threehighlands-chili-cook-off-fivehighlands-chili-cook-off-twoHighlands Annual Chili Cook-Off
Highlands Chamber of Commerce’s Chili Cook-off, was held Saturday, March 15, at the Highlands Community Building. The Cook-off brings more than a small measure of heat to this grayest month. It’s a night of piquant experiences, music and dancing, and refreshments to match the excitement. This year’s winners were: The Most Unique Chili – Cyprus for S.O.A.R.; The Best Traditional Chili – Terry Wilson; The Hottest – Tom Bailey; Best Cornbread – Chestnut Hill; Best Salsa – Debbie Grossman; Best Table Decorations – The Charnoky Family. Toe-tapping music was provided by Blue Ridge Music.

 

highlands-harlmen-ambassadors-threehighlands-harlmen-ambassadorshighlands-harlmen-ambassadors-twoHarlem Ambassadors
Photos by Federico Bigazzi
Sponsored by Mountaintop Rotary, the Harlem Ambassadors brought their brand of frenetic basketball fun to Highlands School on Saturday, March 15. Proceeds from the event go to fund a variety of community projects and organizations.

Doing the Time

Under the careful watch of Highlands finest, community  leaders Michael Johnson, Pat Allen and Bryan Crook do a  little time to benefit Highlands Playhouse.

Under the careful watch of Highlands finest, community leaders Michael Johnson, Pat Allen and Bryan Crook do a little time to benefit Highlands Playhouse.

Highlands community leaders are taking a break from their daily duties to spend time in “jail” for the Highlands Playhouse to gain charitable donations for
their release.
The Highlands Playhouse Lock-Up, set for May 31, is a high-spirited way to help the Playhouse with operating expenses.
By agreeing to do time, Playhouse Jailbirds from the community go behind bars as they ask family, friends and business contacts to make donations to their “bail” to benefit the Highlands Playhouse to help continue the tradition of professional theatre. Community support is the driving force that enables the Playhouse to continue providing high quality
professional entertainment.
“The Playhouse Lock-Up is a fun and exciting way for community leaders to show their support of arts and entertainment on the plateau,” said Tammy Hernandez, Highlands Playhouse Managing Director. “The arts play such an important role in our daily lives and we are blessed to have a dynamic community that will come together to support
the Playhouse.”
The goal for each Jailbird is to raise $500 to help support the oldest theatre in North Carolina. “Living theatre” came to Highlands 75 years ago to serve as a gathering place for all who love live entertainment, served up by professional actors and other performers who make it their passion.
Once arrested, Jailbirds will be transported to the mock jail in Town Square on Saturday, May 31, where they are encouraged to make additional calls to friends and business associates to raise money for their bail.
To nominate a community leader that you’d like to see “do time,” call (828) 526-2695.

Contributed by Tammy Hernandez

Calling All Artists

Friends of the Library President Adair Simon

Friends of the Library President Adair Simon

Friends of the Albert Carlton-Cashiers Community Library is sponsoring a poster contest for professional and amateur artists in Jackson and Macon counties.
The poster will be used to market and promote the Country Fair that Friends is hosting in celebration of the library’s 20th Anniversary, slated for 2:00 to 5:00 P.M. July 12 at the library.
The contest winner will receive $100 and the opportunity to see his or her work reproduced in print media, pictured on library and community websites, and posted in store fronts and shop windows throughout the plateau and surrounding areas. The winning design may also be used as a custom postmark for Friends of the Library.
Graceann Smith, who is heading up the poster selection committee, said that because the committee honors artistic imagination, there are no rules about what the poster should look like other than it be of a size that can be reproduced for window display and print media, and that it have in its design the basic facts: 1994 Country Fair, 20th Anniversary of the Library, free to the public, date,
time and place.
“We’re fortunate to have so many fine artists living in our neck of the woods,”said Adair Simon, president of Friends. “The anniversary celebration is going to be a big bash, and we believe a creative poster is a great way to brand the event and to get some buzz about it going early.”
She added that the Country Fair will have all the fun things that are typical of a small-town fair.
“We’ll have hot dogs and soft drinks, popcorn and cotton candy; clowns and balloons; three-legged races; a cake walk; face painting, an ice cream eating contest sponsored by Blue Bell Ice Cream, Go Fishing; story telling; lots of music and lots of other activities for children and adults.”
The deadline for entries is April 23. Drawings may be mailed to Friends of the Library, Attn: Graceann Smith, P.O. Box 2628, Cashiers, NC 28717, or turned in at the front desk of the library, which is located at 249 Frank Allen Road in Cashiers.
Anyone with questions should call (828) 743-8871 for further information. Digital entries should be addressed
to gws39@hotmail.com.

by Luke Osteen

Spring into the Arts

Artisans from across the Southeast will offer their creations at the Cashiers Spring Arts and Crafts Show, May 24 and 25 at the Village Green.

Artisans from across the Southeast will offer their creations at the Cashiers Spring Arts and Crafts Show, May 24 and 25 at the Village Green.

The 6th Annual Cashiers Spring Arts and Crafts Show will be held May 24 and 25 at the Cashiers Village Green.
Sponsored by the Rotary Club of Cashiers Valley, the Spring Arts and Crafts Show will run from 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. both Saturday and Sunday, rain or shine. While admission is free, a donation of $3 or more will be accepted to help benefit local community service efforts.
This juried event will showcase some of the finest artisans of the Southeast. With more than 60 exhibitors, featured art media will include clay, wood, fibers, glass, metal, watercolor, oils, and photography, and take the form of jewelry, clothing, indoor and outdoor furniture, quilts, rugs, pottery, paintings, metal art, wooden bowls and ceramics, homemade specialties, and more.
Rotary Club members will provide concessions, offering hamburgers, hot dogs, veggie burgers, and drinks for sale. Families can also take advantage of the nearby playground and picnic areas.
All proceeds will benefit local Rotary programs and community service efforts. The Arts and Crafts Show location on the Village Green is at the intersection of Highways 64 and 107 in beautiful Cashiers, North Carolina. For more information, go to cashiersrotary.org.

Contributed by Robin Taylor

Hop on to the Green

 The splendor of the Cashiers Village Green makes the  perfect backdrop for Easter Weekend.

The splendor of the Cashiers Village Green makes the perfect backdrop for Easter Weekend.

Residents and visitors to the Cashiers area are invited to gather in The Village Green during Easter Weekend for two treasured community traditions.
“The Village Green hosts around 100 events each year, many of them for community enjoyment,” says Jochen Lucke, Board Chair of The Village Green. “It is one of the many reasons The Village Green is known as the heart of Cashiers.”
An Easter Egg Hunt sponsored by S’more Kids Klothes will begin at 11:00 A.M. Saturday, April 19, for children 10 and under.
“Bring your own basket to the Gazebo near The Village Play, and be on time,” says Ann Self, Executive Director of The Village Green. The day’s event will also include a free hot dog lunch and visit with the Easter Bunny at The Village Green Commons.
This is the fourth year of this event organized by Sharon James, the owner of S’Mores Kids Klothes in Cashiers.
“The Easter Egg Hunt has grown every year,” says James, “This year we are adding an Easter Bonnet Contest for the girls.”
Bonnets will be judged on creativity and presentation.
“Sharon James puts so much planning and work into the Easter Egg Hunt,” says Self. “This day promises even more fun for the entire family,” Cashiers area churches will conduct the Community Easter Sunrise Service at 7:00 A.M. on Sunday, April 20, at the Gazebo and Lawn of The Village Green. Everyone is invited to celebrate Easter with music and scripture as the sun ascends over the mountains.
“What a wonderful way to laud the new creation in such a magnificent, natural setting,” says Self.
Those attending are encouraged to bring a lawn chair.
The Village Green provides a beautiful, free public space, however it is a nonprofit organization that depends on contributions to maintain the park and provide such an exceptional venue for the community.
To learn more about The Village Green and these events or to make a donation, call (828) 743-3434 or visit villagegreencashiersnc.com.

CLE: Serving Mind Food!

The excitement of April in Highlands is mirrored in the Center for Life Enrichment’s 2014 Spring
Program Series.
CLE offers a slate of evening computer classes — from iPad courses to Facebook for personal and business use.
Georgia Tech Professor John W. Garver will lead “Diplomacy of a Rising China in South Asia.” This evening class will focus on the strategic problems China faces in expanding relations with other countries in the region
You can sign up for cooking classes, drawing classes, a spring hike to identify wildflowers, tips for growing beautiful dahlias and much more. Information on membership and the complete Spring Program Series can be found on at clehighlands.com or by calling (828) 526-8811.
So when spring fever hits, look to the Center for Life Enrichment for fun, exciting, and educational ways to expand your mind.

Contributed by Bonnie Dayton

Mother Nature: Such a Dresser!

Each spring a remarkable event occurs in the deciduous woodlands of the Highlands Plateau, the emergence of the spring wildflowers. As the first warm rays of sunlight touch the forest floor, thousands of plants awaken from their winter slumber to present an unmatched seasonal exhibit of beauty. They decorate the forest floor with a riot of color and fragrance advertising their beauty to pollinators and humans alike. Nowhere else in the natural world is this display so lavish as in the southern Appalachians. But within a few short weeks the leaves of the trees overhead will fill the canopy and rob the wildflowers of much needed sunlight. Known as ephemerals, due to their short season of productive growth, many of these plants will disappear back into dormancy, not to be seen again until next year’s spring emergence. Don’t miss your opportunity to witness this ephemeral display of unsurpassed beauty.
To mark this occasion the Highlands Biological Foundation will host Wildflower Whimsy on May 2 and 3 at the Highlands Biological Station. This two-day event is a celebration of spring ephemerals and will feature wildflower walks, a native plant auction, and special guest speaker Peter Loewer, the Wild Gardener. On Friday, May 2 at 5:00 P.M., join us for guided tours of the Highlands Botanical Garden, a repository of over 450 species of native pants, to see and learn more about these fleeting spring wildflowers. At 6:00 P.M. Peter Loewer will present “Wildflowers and Native Perennials-and Even a Few Exotics–for the Southeast” at the Highlands Nature Center. Afterwards, stay for a native plant auction, live music, reception with drinks and food, and see the Botanical Garden in a whole new light. On Saturday, May 3 you will have the opportunity to participate in one of four special guided wildflower pilgrimages.
The registration fee for the entire event is $40 for members of the Highlands Biological Foundation and $50 for non-members. Tickets for the Friday evening festivities alone will be $25 at the door. All proceeds benefit the Highlands Botanical Garden. For more information, call (828) 526-2221 or visit highlandsbiological.org/wildflower-whimsy. The Highlands Biological Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization.

Contributed by Michelle S. Ruigrok

Tour de Cashiers

Serious cyclists and weekend dilettantes are invited to enjoy every mile of the glute-pounding, calf-strangling Tour de Cashiers,  set for Saturday, May 3, at the Village Green Commons in Cashiers.

Serious cyclists and weekend dilettantes are invited to enjoy every mile of the glute-pounding, calf-strangling Tour de Cashiers, set for Saturday, May 3, at the Village Green Commons in Cashiers.

Cyclists from across the Southeast are invited to the 22nd annual Tour de Cashiers Mountain Cycling Experience, set for Saturday, May 3, and spanning the scenic byways of Western North Carolina.
Cyclists will follow one of three routes of up to 100 miles across Jackson, Macon and Transylvania Counties riding steep climbs and fast descents over 10,500 feet-plus of elevation changes.
The ride will kick off at 9:00 A.M. at The Village Green Commons in Cashiers. Online registration is open at TourdeCashiers.com. On-site registration and post-event festivities will be held at the Commons pavilion.
Returning riders will be welcomed back at the finish line with a hearty meal, drink and even a hot shower at the nearby Cashiers-Glenville Recreation and Community Centers. Participants also receive a commemorative tee shirt.
Proceeds from the Tour support local community and economic development through the Cashiers Area Chamber according to executive director Stephanie Edwards. Major sponsors this year include the Highlands-Cashiers Hospital, The Laurel Magazine, WHLC, Eagle Eye Inspections, McKee Properties and Indian Hills Water, who are joined by many bronze level financial supporters.
Under the leadership of Dick Zacher and Robert Henderson, Support and Gear trackers will follow riders throughout the day to promote their safety and comfort. Dr. Jack Talmadge and a contingent of more than 60 parents, teachers and staff from the Summit Charter School will operate four rest stops along the way. Seventeen-year veteran volunteer Diane Stumm will organize registration onsite with a cadre of faithful assistants. Route guidance and emergency medical services will be provided by regional fire departments, rescue squads and other law enforcement agencies.
“The Tour de Cashiers offers adventurous athletic challenges suitable for the seasoned to beginner rider,” said Tim O’Brien, president and event chair of the Cashiers Area Chamber of Commerce, which organizes the ride.

by Luke Osteen

Cast for a Cause

If you dream about the challenges and excitement inherent in the streams that surround Highlands, you’ll want to carve out plenty of time for Highlands’ Annual Three River Fly Fishing Tournament, slated for May 1-3.
The tourney is open to all anglers of all skill levels, and there are guided and non-guided competitions.
The fun starts May 1 with a series of clinics to sharpen skills and whet appetites. A trio of workshops will be staged from 9:00 A.M. to noon May 1 at Harris Lake: A Ladies’ Casting Clinic with Joan Cabe; an Open Casting Clinic with local guides; and One on One Coaching for Tournament participants with the North Carolina Fly Fishing Team.
The fly fishing wizards at The Highland Hiker will offer an equipment tune-up and expert advice from noon to 4:00 P.M.
Members of the NC Fly Fishing Team will stage a casting competition at Pine Street Park from 1:00 to 4:00 P.M.
Finally, the tournament offers a Fly Tying Clinic in the Lobby of the Old Edwards Inn from 5:00 to 6:30 P.M. Participants will learn the intricacies of the Jack Cabe Hopper and the lore behind this cherished portion of Highlands heritage. Jack Cabe (whose widow Mary will be leading the Ladies’ Clinic) was a native Highlander with an almost supernatural understanding of the local waterways and the rainbow and brown trout that flourished within. His Hoppers are the product of a lifetime of prowling the streams and seducing those fish.
But that’s all just fun preparation for the tournament. There’ll be two days of spirited competition that test the mettle of beginners and seasoned anglers alike. From Highlands, the fishing boundary will have a northern boundary of US Hwy. 74, a western boundary of the rafting and delayed harvest sections of the Nantahala River, a southern boundary of the Hwy. 28 bridge on the Chattooga River, and an eastern boundary of the Davidson River and the East Fork of the French Broad River.
Funds raised benefit the Town of Highlands Scholarship Fund, which provides scholarships for Highlands High School graduates.
The $500 entry fee for two-person teams includes an invitation to the opening night reception, lunches, a closing night dinner with prizes, and a fishing goody bag. Among the prizes offered by sponsors are weekend getaways, golf outings, dinners, fly rods and reels, waders, wading boots and fishing gear.
Space is limited. Only the first 50 teams to register will be able to participate. Deadline for registration is April 1.
To register or receive more information, visit highlandsthreeriver.com or call the Highlands Visitor Center at (866) 526-5841.

by Luke Osteen

The Spirit Of Arbor Day

The Smokey Shrew (Sorex Fumeus ). Photo by Patrick Brannon

The Smokey Shrew (Sorex Fumeus ). Photo by Patrick Brannon

The Highlands Biological Station is hosting activities to celebrate Earth Week in April.
Spend the eve of Earth Week in the Highlands Botanical Garden for the “Earth Day of Service Volunteer Day” on Saturday, April 19, from 10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. All ages are welcome to help maintain the health and beauty of the Botanical Garden, so please bring the family to work with the Garden’s horticulturists for the whole day or a time slot that suits you. Lunch and tools will be provided. Contact our horticulturists at (828) 526-0188 to find out about planned tasks, to R.S.V.P., or with questions.
On April 22 from 7:00 to 8:00 P.M., Nature Center director Patrick Brannon will present a talk on the impact of discarded bottles along our mountain roads on the mortality of small mammals. Learn simple ways to help save the shrews! Each year, many shrews and rodents enter bottles in search of food or water and become entrapped, resulting in the deaths of hundreds of animals over time. Brannon will discuss the research he and his students have conducted to examine the severity of this phenomenon in our region and how you can help alleviate the problem. This lecture is appropriate for all ages and is free.
Celebrate Arbor Day at the Botanical Garden with a “Living with Trees” tour guided by Horticulturist Ezra Gardiner on Friday, April 25, from 2:00 to 4:00 P.M. Gardiner will discuss noteworthy trees of the Highlands Plateau, as well as their identification, residential use, and care. In the spirit of Arbor Day, visitors will leave with a native tree to take home and plant. Contact Gardiner at (828) 526-0188 or egardiner@email.wcu.edu to R.S.V.P. or with any questions. Volunteers are welcome any time in the Botanical Garden, Herbarium, or propagation program.
All of these activities are free and open to the public. For more information about these and other events, visit highlandsbiological.org. Visitors are always welcome to the offices at 265 North Sixth Street, or call the foundation at (828) 526-2221.

Contributed by Michelle S. Ruigrok

Grade “A” Feast

Summit Charter School’s annual “Taste of the Plateau” events will be held June 26 and June 29

Summit Charter School’s annual “Taste of the Plateau” events will be held June 26 and June 29

The Fourth of July won’t be the only thing that will light up the sky this summer. Get ready for an explosion of culinary delights at two unforgettable fundraising events hosted by Summit Charter the weekend before Independence Day.
Beginning Thursday, June 26, from 6:00 to 11:00 P.M. a Vine and Dine patron party and gourmet wine-pairings dinner will be held at The Country Club of Sapphire Valley. A Food and Wine Tasting event with the region’s finest chefs is scheduled for Sunday, June 29, from 6:00 to 11:00 P.M. on the school’s campus.
Summit Charter School is honored and proud to announce Karl Lundgren, Executive Chef for The Country Club of Sapphire Valley as the featured chef.
Chef Karl has maintained Five Star and Five Diamond ratings at hotel and resort restaurants in such outstanding establishments as The Breakers Hotel (Palm Beach, Florida), Mandarin Oriental, Silks (San Francisco), and The Boca Raton Resort & Club (Boca Raton, Florida).
And where do the proceeds from these festivities go? The Summit Charter School is a tuition-free North Carolina Honor School of Excellence, enrolling students in Grades K-8. Serving the diverse socio-economic families of Jackson, Macon, and Transylvania counties, the school’s mission is “to provide a creative and nurturing environment where our children can seek excellence within themselves and in their endeavors.” Proceeds raised will help close the $1,500 gap between the per pupil allotment given by the state and county and what it costs to educate each student at Summit.
For more information about the Taste of the Plateau and its evolving lineup of participating chefs, visit tasteoftheplateau.org. Your donation, in exchange for an entertaining weekend, is a long-term investment in our children’s futures.

by Donna Rhodes | Photo by Sarah Valentine

Four for Fore!

There’s no better way to welcome spring than to join your fellow golfers in the Rotary Club’s 25th Annual Golf Tournament, set for Monday, May 5, at Highlands Country Club. Registration is at 10:00 A.M. with a shotgun start at 11:00 A.M. Plan to get in a few practice swings at the driving range or try your putting on the practice green before the competition begins.
Foursome teams will play a four-man scramble or captain’s choice. The Donald Ross-designed course was once the home of famed amateur golfer Bobby Jones. This is a great opportunity to play the oldest and most prestigious course in our area. Show your golf prowess on this course, which has challenged many fine golfers throughout the years. Mulligans can be purchased for $5 each. In addition to a number of raffle prizes, you will be awarded a prize if you are closest to the pin or have the longest drive. Enjoy a delicious lunch at the turn.
Proceeds from this event allow the Rotary Club to support their many charitable projects. Throughout the years, the Tournament has raised more than $100,000 to support community projects such as the Student Foreign Exchange Program, the Literacy Council, the local Boy Scout Troop, the Peggy Crosby Center, the Hudson Library, plus many other community groups.
Registration for each player is $150. Make your reservations now by contacting Rotarian Joyce Baillargeon at (828) 526-2181 or (828) 421-3551 or jbaillargeon@highlandscountryclub.com. If you’re not able to play, but would like to support the Rotary Club with a hole or corporate sponsorship, contact Joyce. There’s no better way to promote your business and support our community than a fun game of golf at the
Rotary Tournament.
Fore!

By Wiley Sloan

Little Women… Big Production

Pictured are “the” Little Women.  L to R:  Kathryn Potts as Amy; Raina Trent as Jo; Destiny Ferra Martin as Meg and Tiffany Preda as Beth.

Pictured are “the” Little Women. L to R: Kathryn Potts as Amy; Raina Trent as Jo; Destiny Ferra Martin as Meg and Tiffany Preda as Beth.

In its seventh year, the PAC Youth Theater is presenting the period piece ‘Little Women’ by Louisa May Alcott. Students from Highlands High School and Blue Ridge School, as well as home-schooled students, look forward to the spring semester when the PAC Youth Theater picks up again. The auditions were held on February 9, with call backs on February 26 and now the after school rehearsals have begun. The cast is perfectly suited for the four sisters and their friends. Raina Trent will portray Jo, the aspiring writer. Destiny Ferra Martin will be Meg, the far more lady like older sister; Tiffany Preda has been cast as Beth, the younger, shy, gentle pianist; Kathryn Potts will take on the role of Amy, the beautiful and artistic sister. Marmee, the mother, is to be played by Taylor Crawford; Stella Wilson will be Hannah, the Irish housekeeper, and Sarah Ballentine will portray Aunt Marsh, a peppery wealthy aunt.
Rounding out the cast will be Johnnie Perez as Laurie, and Billy Brennan as the tutor, John Brooke. Dean Zuch will make a guest appearance as Mr. Lauren, Laurie’s grandfather. The Tech crew will consist of Pollyanna Ballentine, Katie Flynn, River Trent, Ivy Trent, Ashlynne Baumgarner, Taylor Baumgarner, Lindsey Lombard, Sara Lombard, and Madison Schandolph.
Dr. Ronnie Spilton will be directing and instructing the PAC Youth Theater. ‘Little Women’ is set in 1863 New England and centers around four sisters as they grow up, fall in love, and face life during the Civil War. With their father, Mr. March, away serving as a chaplain in the army, their mother attempts to hold things together at home. The girls employ creativity and courage to help their mother while pursuing their own dreams. Familiar to nearly everyone, ‘Little Women’ is considered an American literary classic and will touch the hearts of every person in the audience.
‘Little Women’ will be presented at the Highlands PAC on April 24, 25, 26, and 27. Tickets are available online at highlandspac.org, or by calling (828) 526-9047. Highlands PAC is located at 507
Chestnut Street.

Contributed by Mary Adair Leslie

Easter Week Religious Services

easterchurchCashiers’ Area Churches Holy Week Services: Noon to 1:00 P.M., with free lunch, no rsvp is necessary. Monday, April 14: Church of the Good Shepherd; Tuesday, April 15: Grace Community Church; Wednesday, April 16: Christ Church of the Valley; Thursday, April 17: Cashiers Church of God; Friday, April 18: Cashiers United Methodist Church

Highlands Community Stations of the Cross: Good Friday, April 18 at noon; Beginning at Our Lady Of The Mountains Catholic Church followed by Liturgy in the Church of the Incarnation’s Chapel at 1:30 P.M.

Community Easter Sunday Sunrise Service at 7:00 A.M. on Cashiers Village Green Gazebo and Lawn.

 

Community Bible Church

Good Friday Service at 6:00 P.M.

Easter Sunday Service at 10:45 A.M.

(828) 526 4685

 

Episcopal Church of The Incarnation

Great Vigil of Easter in the Chapel,
Saturday April 19 at 7:00 P.M.

Easter Sunday Holy Eucharist Rite II
at 9:00 and 11:00 A.M.

(828) 526-2968

 

Highlands United Methodist Church

Easter Sunday Services at 8:30 and 10:50 A.M.

Bluegrass Service at 9:09 A.M.

(828) 526 3376

 

Our Lady Of The Mountains Catholic Church

Easter Sunday Mass at 10:30 A.M.

(828) 526 2418

Cashiers United Methodist Church

Easter Sunday Services at 8:30 A.M. and  11:00 A.M.

(828) 743 5298

Christ Anglican Church

Easter Sunday Services at at 8:30 A.M. and 10:30 A.M.

(828) 743 1701

Christ Church of the Valley

Easter Sunday Services at 10:45 A.M.

(828) 743 5470

Church of The Good Shepherd

Easter Sunday Service at 8:00 A.M.: Holy Eucharist Rite I

Easter Sunday Service at 9:15 A.M.: Holy Eucharist Rite II

Easter Sunday Service at 11:00 A.M. Holy Eucharist Rite III, Music at all services

Nursery provided for 9:15 A.M. and 11:00 A.M. services

(828) 743 2359

Grace Community Church of Cashiers

Easter Sunday Service at 10:00 A.M.

(828) 743-9814

Living Redeemer Outreach

Easter Sunday Service at 10:45 A.M.

with guest pastor and guest singer

(828) 743 0072

 

 

 

 

Heritage Apple Day

Cashiers-NC-HistorySpring is only a few weeks away and to celebrate the season, the Cashiers Historical Society is inviting one and all to their 2014 Heritage Apple Day on Saturday, March 15, at the Cashiers Community Center from 10:00 A.M. – 2:00 P.M. This is a free event, featuring a grafting demonstration and workshop, apple tree site selection, preparation and care with an SCSU Horticulture Area Agent. Regional apple tree cuttings will be available or bring your own. Over 300 rootstock will be provided at no charge! Refreshments will be available.
Yours truly will speak about Cashiers Valley’s “Apple History” which will include the story of T. R. Zachary’s Apple House which he constructed in 1883 at the same time he was building his home. The old Apple House still stands, after 131 years, in mute testimony to the importance of the fruit from the area’s apple orchards to the mountain farmers. In 1883, when Thompson Roberts (T. R.) Zachary returned from homesteading in Kansas to his birthplace, Cashiers Valley, he built a house and several outbuildings, including said apple house. Still owned by his descendants and located within shouting distance of The Crossroads, the recently taken photo of the apple house illustrates this article. In the walls of “the old place,” as some of us refer to T. R.’s home, not used in many years for storing apples, there is still evidence of T. R.’s thumbprint in the clay chinking between the boards.

Contributed by Jane Gibson Nardy, Historian, Cashiers Historical Society

Earth Day in Highlands

The Smokey Shrew (Sorex Fumeus ). Photo by Patrick Brannon

The Smokey Shrew (Sorex Fumeus ). Photo by Patrick Brannon

The Highlands Biological Station is hosting activities to celebrate Earth Week in April.
Spend the eve of Earth Week in the Highlands Botanical Garden for the “Earth Day of Service Volunteer Day” on Saturday, April 19 from 10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. All ages are welcome to help maintain the health and beauty of the Botanical Garden, so please bring the family to work with the Garden’s horticulturists for the whole day or a time slot that suits you. Lunch and tools will be provided. Contact our horticulturists at (828) 526-0188 to find out about planned tasks, to R.S.V.P, or with questions.
On April 22 from 7:00 to 8:00 P.M., Nature Center director Patrick Brannon will present a talk on the impact of discarded bottles along our mountain roads on the mortality of small mammals. Learn simple ways to help save the shrews! Each year, many shrews and rodents enter bottles in search of food or water and become entrapped, resulting in the deaths of hundreds of animals over time. Brannon will discuss the research he and his students have conducted to examine the severity of this phenomenon in our region, and how you can help alleviate the problem. This lecture is appropriate for all ages and is free.
Celebrate Arbor Day at the Botanical Garden with a “Living with Trees” tour guided by Horticulturist Ezra Gardiner on Friday, April 25 from 2:00 to 4:00 P.M. Gardiner will discuss noteworthy trees of the Highlands Plateau, as well as their identification, residential use and care. In the spirit of Arbor Day, visitors will leave with a native tree to take home and plant. Contact Gardiner at (828) 526-0188 or egardiner@email.wcu.edu to R.S.V.P. or with any questions. Volunteers are welcome any time in the Botanical Garden, Herbarium or propagation program.
All of these activities are free and open to the public. For more information about these and other events, visit www.highlandsbiological.org. Visitors are always welcome to the offices at 265 North Sixth Street, or call the foundation at (828) 526-2221.

Contributed by Michelle S. Ruigrok

Tour de Cashiers

This year’s Tour de Cashiers will be held Saturday, May 3.

This year’s Tour de Cashiers will be held Saturday, May 3.

Sporting a new logo in its 22nd year, the annual Tour de Cashiers Mountain Cycling Experience will be held on Saturday, May 3 across scenic mountain byways of western North Carolina. The popular pedaling event is expected to attract more than 300 participants from the southeast, many returning every year for the traditional spring ride.
Cyclists will follow one of three routes of up to 100 miles across Jackson, Macon and Transylvania Counties riding steep climbs and fast descents over 10,500 feet-plus of elevation changes.
The ride will kick off at 9:00 A.M. from The Village Green Commons. Online registration is open at www.TourdeCashiers.com. On-site registration and post-event festivities will be held at the Commons pavilion.
The Century route will start at Cashiers and run through Toxaway, Balsam Grove and Tuckasegee and across Cullowhee Mountain Road, Elijay, Walnut and Pine Creek Roads. It will wind down Yellow Mountain to Norton Roads and cross the finish line back at the Green.
The Metric 62-mile route will run from the crossroads at US Highway 64 north on NC Highway 107 through Glenville, turning onto Pine Creek Road and finally traveling Highlands Road and Highway 64 to the finish.
The Quarter Century 25-mile route will follow the Metric to Pine Creek Road, then diverge onto North Norton and Norton Roads to return to Highway 64.
Returning riders will be welcomed back at the finish line with a hearty meal, drink and even a hot shower at the nearby Cashiers-Glenville Recreation and Community Centers. Participants also receive a commemorative tee shirt.
Proceeds from the Tour support local community and economic development through the Cashiers Area Chamber according to executive director Stephanie Edwards. For more information, visit www.TourdeCashiers.com, call (828) 743-5191 or email info@CashiersAreaChamber.com.

Highlands Youth Theater

Thanks to an innovative program between the Martin-Lipscomb Performing Arts Center Youth Theater and Highlands High School,  local students will explore the magic of drama, culminating with a public performance April 24-27.

Thanks to an innovative program between the Martin-Lipscomb Performing Arts Center Youth Theater and Highlands High School,
local students will explore the magic of drama, culminating with a public performance April 24-27.

As an outgrowth of the PAC Youth Theater program, Highlands High School will offer a Theater Class to students beginning this semester. The students will receive credit on their transcripts.
The PAC Youth Theater program was initiated because there is no theater arts class taught in our area schools. The program began over six years ago under the direction of
Dr. Ronnie Spilton.
Highlands High School principal Brian Jetter and Spilton collaborated to be able to offer this course. The state curriculum for theater classes was researched; a grant was applied for (and granted from the Community Foundation of Western North Carlolinas and a “teacher of record” was found. The students will be bused from the school to PAC three days a week and Kelly Pla will teach the class at the school the other two days. Ms. Pla is an English teacher at Highlands School.
The PAC Youth Theater program begins its seventh year this month. This after-school program is open to all local students in grades 8 through 12 at no charge. It offers instruction in all aspects of theater, technical and performance, backstage and front of house. The culminating performances will be at PAC, April 24-27. Tickets will be available online at highlandspac.org or by calling (828) 526-9047.
PAC is grateful for everyone who has supported the PAC Youth Theater program over the years — the Rotary Club of Highlands, Mountain Findings, the Macon County Community Fund, the “H” Foundation, the Cullasaja Women’s Outreach, the Eckerd Family Foundation, and the Killian Foundation, plus the numerous individuals who have helped make this program a success by donation and volunteering.
We are so pleased that the program has grown and developed to enter its seven year and going strong. Highlands PAC is located at 507 Chestnut Street in Highlands.

Contributed by Mary Adair Leslie

Annual Rotary Golf Tournament

Last year’s winners:  J.M. Shannon, Terry Potts,  Mike Shannon and Tim O’Connor.

Last year’s winners: J.M. Shannon, Terry Potts,
Mike Shannon and Tim O’Connor.

There’s no better way to welcome spring than to join your fellow golfers in the Rotary Club’s 25th Annual Golf Tournament, set for Monday, May 5, at Highlands Country Club. Registration is at 10:00 A.M. with a shotgun start at 11:00 A.M. Plan to get in a few practice swings at the driving range or try your putting on the practice green before the competition begins.
Foursome teams will play a four man scramble or captain’s choice. The Donald Ross-designed course was once the home of famed amateur golfer Bobby Jones. This is a great opportunity to play the oldest and most prestigious course in our area. Show your golf prowess on this course, which has challenged many fine golfers throughout the years. Mulligans can be purchased for $5 each. In addition to a number of raffle prizes, you will be awarded a prize if you are closest to the pin or have the longest drive. Enjoy a delicious lunch at the turn.
Proceeds from this event allow the Rotary Club to support their many charitable projects. Throughout the years, the Tournament has raised more than $100,000 to support community projects like the Student Foreign Exchange Program, the Literacy Council, local Boy Scout Troop, the Peggy Crosby Center, Hudson Library, plus many other community groups.
Registration for each player is $150. Make your reservations now by contacting Rotarian Joyce Baillargeon at (828) 526-2181 or (828) 421-3551 or jbaillargeon@highlandscountryclub.com. If you’re not able to play but would like to support the Rotary Club with a hole or corporate sponsorship, contact Joyce. There’s no better way to promote your business and support our community than a fun game of golf at the Rotary Tournament.
Fore!

By Wiley Sloan

Highlands NC Chili Cook-Off

Highlands Chili Cook offLet’s face it – by the time March rolls around, we’re all a little desperate for a bit of spice. Winter’s gone on forever and the blush of color that was Valentine’s Day seems like a million years in the past.
That’s why the Highlands Chamber of Commerce’s Annual Chili Cook-off, slated for 6:30 P.M. to 9:30 P.M. Saturday, March 15, at the Community Building (Conference Center) is always such a welcome part of the
social calendar.
The Cook-off brings more than a small measure of heat to this grayest month. It’s a night of piquant experiences, music and dancing, and refreshments to match
the excitement.
You’ll be treated to a full spectrum of culinary delights, ranging from the comfortable embrace of a down home corn bread recipe to a beguiling salsa to a spoonful of chili that calls to mind a firestorm of biblical proportions. Add in music that demands a trip to the dance floor and you have the formula for an evening as irresistible as a neon “Good Food” sign blinking on a frigid winter’s night.
As for the lineup of the chilies themselves – it’s a palate-pleasing spectrum that ranges from the sublimely spiced to the tongue searing. It’s a recipe for the hottest night of the winter. To cool everything off, soft drinks, beer and wine will be served.
There’ll be prizes awarded for Most Unique Chili, Most Traditional, and Hottest; Best Salsa, and Best Cornbread; and Best All-Round Table Decorations.
Tickets are $20 and will be sold at the door the evening of the event. Children 12 and under get in for free.
“If you’re interested in being a competitor, call me at (828) 526-2112,” says Jennifer Cunningham of the Highlands Chamber of Commerce.

By Luke Osteen

Three River Fly Fishing Tournment

Highlands’ Annual Three River Fly Fishing Tournament is set for May 1-3,

Highlands’ Annual Three River Fly Fishing Tournament is set for May 1-3,

Just as you’d guess, the bold streams that have shaped Highlands and drawn generations of visitors are home to wily schools of rainbow and brown trout.
That’s what makes Highlands’ Annual Three River Fly Fishing Tournament, set for May 1-3, such a natural fit on the town’s Event Calendar. The tourney is open to all anglers of all skill levels, and there are guided and
non-guided competitions.
Funds raised benefit the Town of Highlands Scholarship Fund, which provides scholarships for Highlands High School graduates.
The $500 entry fee for two-person teams includes an invitation to the opening night reception, lunches, a closing night dinner with prizes, and a fishing goody bag. Among the prizes offered by sponsors are weekend getaways, golf outings, dinners, fly rods and reels, waders, wading boots and
fishing gear.
Participants will range among 2,000 miles of public stream. Teams will fish one native, one hatchery supported, and one
delayed-harvest stream.
Space is limited. Only the first 50 teams to register will be able to participate. Deadline for registration is April 1.
To register or receive more information, visit highlandsthreeriver.com or call the Highlands Visitor Center at (866) 526-5841.

By Luke Osteen

Wedding Expo in Cashiers

The Blue Ridge Bride Annual Wedding Expo and Fashion Show, slated for Saturday, March 8, at the Sawyer Family Farmstead in Glenville is designed to make a bride’s most cherished dreams a reality.

The Blue Ridge Bride Annual Wedding Expo and Fashion Show, slated for Saturday, March 8, at the Sawyer Family Farmstead in Glenville is designed to make a bride’s most cherished dreams a reality.

If “I Do” is in your future, don’t miss The Blue Ridge Bride Annual Wedding Expo and Fashion Show at the Sawyer Family Farmstead in Glenville from 11:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. March 8.
The Sawyer Farmstead features a beautiful pavilion, the perfect setting for the Annual Bridal Expo and Runway
Fashion Show.
TheBlueRidgeBride.com is an online wedding planning library of artistic experts in the area who provide exceptional services to couples preparing for their perfect wedding day. Visit its qualified vendors and get the answers to all your questions. They delight in making your wedding dreams come true.
Blue Ridge Bride Board President Jacqueline Weiks, who has over nineteen years’ experience in destination wedding events, says, “The Expo allows couples to come and meet with all the experts at one time in one place. This is all that you will need for your exceptional wedding and all the celebrations surrounding it.”
Don’t forget to pick up your free bridal swag bag, courtesy of The Knot. Visit each vendor and register to win his/her booth’s prize. Among the day’s festivities are a courtesy make-up session, hair-styling, tastings, and advice on the latest trends. At 2:00 P.M., grab a front-row seat for the Bridal Fashion Show Extravaganza featuring designer gowns.
Whatever you desire, you will find it and more at The Blue Ridge Bride Wedding Expo. Let the pros be your bride-guide in planning all the details that make your wedding a treasured memory. Plan your personal theme, your bridal luncheon, reception, guest accommodations, flowers, favors, golf excursions for the guys, bridal party couture, and much more.
So skip the stress and trust the best to make your wedding a memorable experience. Take advantage of this opportunity to compare styles, options, and pricing all in a one-stop destination. Spend the day. Lunch will be available at a great price.
Visit theblueridgebride.com. Click on the event tab to learn more about the Expo. Or call Jacqui Weiks at (828) 508-1911 for more details.

by Donna Rhodes

Highlands Chili Cook Off

Wake up your slumbering palate at the Highlands Chamber of  Commerce’s Chili Cook-off, Saturday, March 15, at the Highlands  Community Building.

Wake up your slumbering palate at the Highlands Chamber of Commerce’s Chili Cook-off, Saturday, March 15, at the Highlands Community Building.

Let’s face it – by the time March rolls around, we’re all a little desperate for a bit of spice. Winter’s gone on forever and the blush of color that was Valentine’s Day seems like a million years in the past.
That’s why the Highlands Chamber of Commerce’s Annual Chili Cook-off, slated for 6:30 to 9:30 P.M. Saturday, March 15, at the Community Building (Conference Center) is always such a welcome part of the social calendar.
The Cook-off brings more than a small measure of heat to this grayest month. It’s a night of piquant experiences, music and dancing, and refreshments to match
the excitement.
You’ll be treated to a full spectrum of culinary delights, ranging from the comfortable embrace of a down home cornbread recipe to a spoonful of chili that calls to mind a fire storm of biblical proportions. Add in music that demands a trip to the dance floor and you have the formula for an evening as irresistible as a neon “Good Food” sign blinking on a frigid winter’s night.
As for the lineup of the chilies themselves – it’s a palate-pleasing spectrum that ranges from the sublimely spiced to the tongue searing. It’s a recipe for the hottest night of the winter. To cool everything off, soft drinks, beer and wine will be served.
There’ll be prizes awarded for Most Unique Chili, Most Traditional, and Hottest; Best Salsa, and Best Cornbread; and Best All-Round Table Decorations.
Tickets are $20 and will be sold at the door the evening of the event. Children 12 and under get in for free.
“If you’re interested in being a competitor, call me at (828) 526-2112,” says Jennifer Smathers of the Highlands Chamber of Commerce. “This year we’re offering all competitors that make chili $25 to help offset the cost. Prizes will be $100 or more in value.”

By Luke Osteen

Cashiers Chocolate Cook Off

chocolatecakeThe Friends of the Albert Carlton-Cashiers Community Library are serving up their Third Chocolate Cook-off Saturday, February 8, in the library’s Meeting Room. Cost is $6, with children under five free.
“This will help us get rid of the winter blahs – and what better way than to gorge ourselves on chocolate – celebrate Valentine’s Day, and support the Friends of the Library,” says organizer Bonnie Zacher. “It’s an opportunity for some friendly competition to make the best chocolate dish in town. All proceeds go to the Friends of the Library to advocate for and enhance library services for local residents.”
There are two categories: one for the professionals (chefs, banquet coordinators, and caterers) and one for the public.
Anyone interested in entering the cook-off should pick up an entry form at the library or call Bonnie Zacher at (828) 743-0489, or Kathie Blozan at (828) 743-1765. All entry forms should be returned by February 4.
“Chocolate confections can be anything made with chocolate, from candies to cakes to brownies and other desserts,” said Mrs. Zacher. “Each entrant will make one dessert that will be judged and later sold and there’ll be additional small bites for the public to taste. Judging will be based on taste, texture, aroma, creativity and eye appeal.”
Membership in the Friends of the Library is open to all who believe in the importance of public libraries to individuals and the community. Membership forms are available at the front desk at the Albert Carlton-Cashiers Community Library.

Movies in Highlands!

Delaina Drysdale-Webb and Ann Marie Osteen offer up tasty snacks to theatre goers.

Delaina Drysdale-Webb and Ann Marie Osteen offer up tasty snacks to theatre goers.

The Highlands Playhouse Movie Theatre brings the best of Hollywood entertainment to the residents of Highlands and Cashiers. The newly-installed equipment ensures that local audiences enjoy all the excitement of big screen blockbusters and
intimate dramas.
Playhouse Board Member Wanda Drake says that a key benefit of the Highlands theatre is that it gives our young people a place for entertainment without having to drive down the mountain.
“Keeping our youngsters safe is paramount for all of us,” Wanda says, “and we all get to enjoy the many great movies too.
“The support of the community has been fabulous. Our ticket sales for movies like ‘Captain Phillips,’ ‘Last Vegas’ and The Hunger Games: Catching Fire’ have been tremendous. It really pleased the movie studios. We outperformed major megaplexes in Greenville and Asheville!”
The Playhouse is still paying for the equipment, so patrons are asked to enjoy the concessions — popcorn, candy, soft drinks, water or even a glass of wine. The profit from concessions helps defray the overhead costs of the Theatre. If you want to do even more, send your tax- deductible check to the Playhouse.
“The movie studios rigidly control which movies are released and how long they are shown,” says Playhouse Board President Scott Allbee. “We plan to offer first-run, classic and children’s movies throughout the year.”
Movie listings are available in multiple venues including the Playhouse website at highlandsplayhouse.org or recorded message at (828) 526-2695.
Movies are shown Thursday through Sunday. Matinees begin at 4:00 P.M. and evening movies begin at 7:00 or 7:30 P.M., depending on the length of the movie. Tickets are $8, plus tax. Call the Box Office and charge your ticket. Think about a movie gift certificate for friends or your customers. Groups are always welcome.

Highlands Annual Christmas Dinner

Make your reservations now for what may be the final Highlands Annual Christmas Dinner by calling (828) 526-9419.

Make your reservations now for what may be the final Highlands Annual Christmas Dinner by calling (828) 526-9419.

Looking back to 2001, Jan Zehr was the owner of the Main Street Inn, and people were wondering where they could send their guests for a meal on Christmas Day.
At that time, no restaurants were open on that very special day. Jan came up with the idea of doing a Christmas Day Meal at the Main Street Inn to serve Highlanders and visitors, and to make it a fundraiser for our local Habitat for Humanity organization. All accommodations people would make something, Jan and Ferrell would do the turkeys and some fabulous desserts, and maybe somebody would show up.
And they did! Not so many, but we served 50 or so. We offered a homemade meal with desserts, wine as an option, and since we all donated everything we put into the meal and had an all-volunteer group working the dinner, all the proceeds, around $2000, could go to Habitat.
The dinner continued like that for a few more years, and we added chefs like Marty Rosenfield, owner of Lakeside Restaurant and Debbie Grossman of Fresser’s Eatery. Marty’s wife, Donna Woods, joined us and made her now-famous dressing, until Jan sold the Main Street Inn. She needed a little break, so we took off a year.
In 2007, Marty and Ricky Siegel of the 4 ½ Street Inn got together and decided to bring back the dinner. We were able to use the old Log Cabin location for the event, and we were back in business.
Over the next several years, the event continued to grow. We moved it to Fresser’s Eatery for a couple of years, where we were able to serve more folks and then to its current location, The Hudson House of The Highlands Country Club, which allowed us to serve more guests than ever, and where we will hold the event this year. Over the years, the dinner has raised around $130,000. The nonprofits that we’ve supported have been The Literacy Council of Highlands, Highlands-Cashiers Hospital, The Highlands Emergency Council, REACH of Macon County, Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Highlands, Highlands Hospice, Carpe Diem Farms, The Highlands School Library, The Highlands Free Medical Clinic, The Highlands-Cashiers Free Dental Clinic, and The Highlands Food Pantry.
But like all things, the Dinner, for us, has run its course. We hope that someone or some group might want to continue the tradition. But for now, we are preparing for our last Dinner. There will be the bountiful buffet of turkey, ham, tenderloin, and all the sides. We will have a glass of wine for our adult guests should they want one, and of course, coffee, tea, and other beverages for our guests. And all at the price of $35 for adults, $15 for children under 12, and kids five and under eat for free.
Each year, the sponsorship for this event has grown along with the event. You or your organization can be placed on our donor Recognition Board, as a “Candle” for a $100 sponsorship, an “Ornament” for a $250 sponsorship, a “Present” for $500, or a “Star” for $1000. Over the last few years, we have even had donations of $2000 and more that we have recognized as our “Superstars.” You can make out sponsorship checks to H.A.N.D.S, the Highlands Area Nonprofit Donation Sharing, a 501(c) (3), and send them to Lakeside Restaurant, 531 Smallwood Avenue, or the 4 ½ Street Inn, 55 4 ½ Street, both of Highlands, NC 28741. All monies raised by this event go to the nonprofits.
Seating will begin at 11:00 A.M. and continue until 5:00 P.M, and is by reservation only. You may reserve your seating time by calling (828) 526-9419.

Contributed by Rick Siegel

Shop with a Cop

Don’t miss The Rotary’s “Shop with a Cop” Bingo Thursday, December 5, beginning at 6:00 P.M. at the Highlands Community Building.

Don’t miss The Rotary’s “Shop with a Cop” Bingo Thursday, December 5, beginning at 6:00 P.M. at the Highlands Community Building.

Imagine; there’s a policeman at your door, wanting to speak to your child. And you’re happy. Because you know that he or she has come to take your daughter or son Christmas shopping. This is “Shop with a Cop”
in action.
Begun in 2008 by the efforts of Macon County Sheriff Robbie Holland, and heavily supported by the Highlands Rotary Club, this program takes deserving kids on a shopping spree. With $100 to spend, a kid and an area cop head out to Walmart to see what they can buy. The only rule is that the child must purchase something for themselves and something for someone else in their family.
Last year the program generated nearly $20,000. Highlands Rotary Club was the largest single supporter, contributing about $6,000 through efforts such as “Shop with a Cop” Bingo and the generous gifts of many individual donors. Walmart also does their part by heavily discounting the purchases.
Law enforcement officers throughout the county and Highlands take part in this program. Deserving kids are nominated by local family service agencies and then are paired with the officers.
Not only does the program help many of these lower-income children with gift-giving but it also helps to humanize the image of the law enforcement officer.
So, if you are asked to contribute to this program this Christmas season, please be generous. Gifts can be made to the Macon County Sheriff’s Department, the Highlands Police Department or any member of the
Highlands Rotary Club.

Contributed by Peter Ray

HCP Annual Holiday Reading

Wayne Coleman, Donna Cochran, Vangie Rich, John Gaston and  Mary Ann Ray will share their unforgettable Christmas tales during the  annual Holiday Reading, December 12 at the Performing Arts Center.

Wayne Coleman, Donna Cochran, Vangie Rich, John Gaston and
Mary Ann Ray will share their unforgettable Christmas tales during the
annual Holiday Reading, December 12 at the Performing Arts Center.

Celebrate Christmas around the World during the annual Holiday Reading by the Highlands-Cashiers Players at 7:30 P.M. Thursday, December 12, at the Martin-Lipscomb Performing Arts Center on Chestnut. Admission
is free.
For more than 16 years, stories by the players have created vivid Christmas memories for their audience. This year, Director Vangie Rich is joined by other Highlanders to share how Christmas is celebrated around
the world.
Wolfgang and Mindy Green will share German holiday traditions while Mary Ann Ray and her husband Larry are joined by Dr. Bradley Martin to tell us how Australians celebrate
the season.
Vangie will tell about her holiday experiences in Brazil. You’ll hear a beautiful Christmas song written by Highlands native Betty Holt and performed by Vangie and Wayne Coleman. Everyone is invited to join in favorite carols.
Inspiring stories, humor, sentimental memories — there’s something for everyone in this holiday performance. No tickets are needed. Come early for a good seat. The Performing Arts Center is located at 507 Chestnut Street, just four blocks from Highlands’ Main Street.

By Wiley Sloan

Familar Faces in The Nutcracker

Is there anything that is more reminiscent of the Christmas season than Tchaikovsky’s “The Nutcracker?”
A group of local girls will be sharing the magic of this Christmas classic in a trio of performances at Franklin’s Smokey Mountain Center for the Performing Arts, Friday, December 20, at 7:00 P.M. and Saturday, December 21, at 2:00 P.M. and at 7:00 P.M.
Amber Miller, Ali Bolt, Austin Vinson, Emma Weller, Jessica Campbell, and Anna and Hillary Stiehler join their fellow ballerinas from Betsy’s School of Dance to perform Tchaikovsky’s masterpiece.
The original ballet premiered in St. Petersburg, Russia, but was met with tepid reception. The audience just did not follow the story and felt that there were too many youngsters in the dance troupe. It was just too radical for its time period.
Brought to America in the 1940s, “The Nutcracker” received a much better reception. It has now become the mainstay of the Christmas season for many cities
and towns.
I am sure you remember the story where the family gathers around the elaborately decorated Christmas tree on Christmas Eve. The children excitedly open their gifts. Young Natasha receives a wooden nutcracker as one of her presents. Her rowdy brother breaks the nutcracker. Clara pines for her broken nutcracker but does allow it to not ruin her holiday spirit. After everyone has gone to bed, Clara sneaks back out to check on her treasured nutcracker. Magically he comes to life. That’s when the true fantasy begins. Clara is rescued from the evil Rat King while she travels through the snowflake forest and the Land
of Sweets.
Dancers of all levels can find their spot in this toe-tapping performance. What young girl who has taken dance does not fondly remember her dance performance in the local production of “The Nutcracker?” Eye-catching costumes, inspiring music and the cherub faces of excited young children fill everyone with the wonder of Christmas.
To get your tickets go to info@greatmountainmusic.com or call (866) 273-4615. See you at “The Nutcracker.”

By Wiley Sloan

Highlands NC Christmas Parade

The Highlands Olde Mountain Christmas Parade, set for Saturday,  December 7, may be the world’s biggest small-town Christmas.

The Highlands Olde Mountain Christmas Parade, set for Saturday,
December 7, may be the world’s biggest small-town Christmas.

If you’re one of those who bemoan the commercialization of Christmas and longs for a simpler celebration of the season, mark your calendar for 11:00 A.M. Saturday, December 7.
That’s when the twenty-first incarnation of the Highlands Olde Mountain Christmas Parade winds down
Main Street.
The parade is the perfect tonic for the overblown, incredibly polished corporate exercises staged in other parts of the country. There’s a warm, homemade feel to much of the Highlands parade since it’s staged entirely by local groups, churches, businesses, fire departments and bands of neighbors. It’s all delivered with pride, sparkle and more than a little bit of humor.
You’ll find handmade floats, at least one marching band, dancing garden ladies, dogs that amble more or less in formation, fire trucks, Smokey the Bear, classic cars, horses, the Highlands High School Homecoming Court, local politicians, and, of course, Santa. It’s not uncommon for the parade to draw over 80 entries. That’s a remarkable accomplishment for a town with a year-round population of around 2,000.
People begin lining Main Street early to ensure they get a good view and to chat with neighbors and visitors. The parade route spans three blocks, so there should be plenty of room for everyone.
If you are part of a group that would like to be included in the lineup, contact the Highlands Chamber of Commerce at (828) 526-2112 or visit Jennifer Smathers at the Visitor Center, 108 Main Street.
If you’re thinking of inviting Santa to participate in your entry, please note that he’s already accepted the Chamber’s invitation to appear at the end of the parade. You wouldn’t want to confuse the kids.

By Luke Osteen

“Sing We All Noel”

Celebrate the season at The Highlands Community Christian Chorale’s Christmas Concert at the Episcopal Church of the Incarnation at 5:00 P.M. Saturday, December 14, and 5:00 P.M. Sunday, December 15.
A reception will follow the Sunday performance. The church is located at the corner of Fifth and Main Streets.
The Chorale will consist of 40 of our areas’ most talented singers who have been practicing for this performance since Labor Day. They are performing under the direction of conductor Grat Rosazza.
This year’s concert, entitled “Sing We All Noel,” will feature songs that we all know and love.
“There will be something for everyone in this concert,” Grat says. “Whether you prefer classical, traditional or folk music, you won’t be disappointed in this year’s program. I am a big fan of the work of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, so expect to hear at least one or two arrangements.”
Classic song lovers will be inspired by Faure’s “Cantique de Jean Racine” written by the 19-year-old French composer in the 1860s. Enjoy the soothing tones of harpist Valerie Von Pechy Whitcup as she accompanies the chorale. The African-American carol “Go Tell It on the Mountain” was written about the same time period as the “Cantique” and boasts a lively beat. You will be tapping your toes for this one. The Catalanish song “Fum, Fum, Fum,” originated in the late 16th or early 17th century.
I look forward to the chorale’s rendition of “O Holy Night.” That is one of my favorite Christmas songs.
“Many people feel that Christmas would not be Christmas without one or two pieces from Handel’s ‘The Messiah.’ We have included that too,” says Grat. In addition to the harp, the chorale will be accompanied by Bryan Heller, pianist for the Cashiers United Methodist Church, and a small string orchestra.
Everyone will get a chance to sing Christmas carols during intermission.
I look forward to seeing each of you at the Episcopal Church of the Incarnation for one of these inspiring performances.
Come early as the venues tend to fill up quickly. Be prepared to share a small donation to help the chorale offset the cost of music.

By Wiley Sloan

Photos with Santa

Santa will be visiting Highlands Town Square for photos and fun throughout the Christmas Season.

Santa will be visiting Highlands Town Square for photos and fun throughout the Christmas Season.

Now that the holiday season is here, a lot of kids and more than a few adults are taking stock of their lives and making adjustments. Others are compiling lists of things needed and desired, the fruits of a year’s worth of
good behavior.
Whichever camp they fall in, they’re counting the days until Santa Claus arrives in Highlands at Town Square. He’ll be there Saturdays leading up to Christmas.
Even in the hectic days leading up to Christmas, Santa manages to find time to sit and listen to his friends and Highlands has long been one of his favorite spots. According to insider accounts, the clean mountain air helps him maintain his unfailingly cheerful spirit, which makes Highlands one of the ideal spots to ask for an especially unlikely present or to appeal
for clemency.
If you’re so inclined, you can bring a treat for Santa or his reindeer. But really, none of that is necessary. He packs on the snacks in those few hours before dawn on Christmas morning and the reindeer are confined to a high-carb sprinter’s diet in the weeks leading up to the
Big Night.
If you have questions about Santa’s busy schedule or the events that mark Highlands’ Holiday Season – the Olde Mountain Christmas Parade, the worship schedules of local churches – contact the Highlands Visitor Center at (828) 526-2112.

By Luke Osteen

Carol Sing

The sanctuary of the First Presbyterian Church of Highlands is the perfect setting  for the Town Carol Sing.

The sanctuary of the First Presbyterian Church of Highlands is the perfect setting
for the Town Carol Sing.

It’s almost a certainty that Highlands’ Olde Mountain Christmas Parade, set for Saturday, December 7, will have you humming Christmas carols non-stop. If that’s the case, take time for a leisurely lunch and then join your friends at the First Presbyterian Church of Highlands at 2:00 P.M.
Song Leader Stell Huie and pianist/organist Angie Jenkins will lead everyone in well-loved Christmas carols. Young and old alike celebrate the season in song at this annual event.
For years to come, your family will speak fondly of this favorite Christmas outing. The church is located at the corner of Fifth and Main Street, high on the hill.
Dress is casual. If you have questions, call the church office at (828) 526-3175.

By Wiley Sloan

Breakfast with Santa

Santa delights in greeting his youngest fans and reminding them of the promise at the heart of Christmas.

Santa delights in greeting his youngest fans and reminding them of the promise at the heart of Christmas.

Santa Claus will visit Highlands United Methodist Church for a breakfast with local children and those from far away at 8:30 A.M. Saturday, December 14.
After a delicious breakfast prepared by church volunteers, children will get to complete a holiday craft and listen to the traditional Nativity story.
Each child will have the opportunity to talk to Santa and tell him what they’re hoping to find this Christmas.
The suggested donation is $10 per family. Reservations should be made by calling the church no later than Monday, December 9, at (828) 526-3376.
Jennifer Forrester, Director of Children Ministries at HUMC, says, “The children will have plenty of time to share their Christmas list with Santa and to have pictures made. Make your reservations early and come out for a stellar holiday celebration with Santa.”
The church is located at 315 Main Street, the site of the Town Christmas Tree.

By Wiley Sloan

Cashiers Christmas Parade

CASHIERS-Christmas-Parade-2012-3Cashiers is a tiny community (slightly smaller than Highlands, a bit bigger than Whoville), but some how it manages to stage one of the most beloved Christmas Parades in Western North Carolina, year
after year.
This year’s parade, the 39th, will launch at noon on Saturday, December 14. It’ll wind through the Crossroads at the intersection of Highways 107 and 64 and you can expect to see marching bands, floats, dancers, horses, dogs, antique fire engines and, of course, Santa Claus.
The parade route will include three stops where bands, floats and other groups can sing or play a recorded version of their musical selection and invite parade viewers to sing along.
If you’d like to enter the parade, contact the Cashiers Area Chamber of Commerce at info@cashiersareachamber.com. They have people standing by to help make you realize your vision.

7th Annual Culinary Weekend

highlands-nc-culinary-weekendhighlands-nc-culinary-weekend-onehighlands-nc-culinary-weekend-fourhighlands-nc-culinary-weekend-twoFall in Highlands has never looked better as we celebrate the seventh Annual Highlands
Culinary Weekend.
This four-day destination event, created by the Highlands Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center, promises to be one of the highlights of the season.
Join us as we embrace Highlands’ majestic mountain location, boundless activities, appealing accommodations, unique retail shops and extraordinary cuisine. The weekend gains momentum with the not to be missed Opening Night Celebration, Thursday, November 7, held at the esteemed Highlands Country Clubhouse.
Beginning at 7:00 P.M., enjoy great music, a variety of wine tasting tables, and the delectable cuisine of Highlands’ local chefs. Throughout the weekend, fill your itineraries with an array of activities, cooking demonstrations, tastings and dinners hosted by area restaurants, merchants and accommodations. Experience the wares of Highlands’ fine shops by attending the annual Sip & Stroll held on Friday and Saturday, November 8 and 9, from 11:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. in beautiful downtown.
Opening Night Gala Reception at The Clubhouse at Highlands Country Club: Thursday, November 7, beginning at 7:00 P.M., sip, swirl and savor fine wines and craft beers while enjoying the delectable cuisines of Highlands’ local chefs. This entire experience will be a chance to embrace culinary delight under one roof in the beautiful mountains of Highlands. Taste a must-have wine? Mountain Fresh Grocery will be on hand to take your orders and arrange for delivery.
Shuttle service will be provided from Highlands Recreation Park and Highlands Plaza to the Clubhouse at Highlands Country Club. Tickets are $75 and can be purchased at the door or in advance at highlandsculinaryweekend.com or by calling 1 (866) 526-5841.
Friday, November 8 Events: The Hen House featuring Sallie’s Greatest Herbal Fruit Jams; Sip & Stroll at The Bascom; “Old Vines and Young Turks” at Cyprus International Cuisine; Seasonal Craft Beer Pairing Dinner at Ruka’s Table; Robert Biale Vineyards Wine Dinner at On the Verandah; Cakebread Cellars Celebration at Lakeside Restaurant; Lambert Bridge, Flavor Spectrum with Andy Wilcox at Wolfgang’s Restaurant and Wine Bistro; Third Annual Farm Harvest Dinner and Barn Dance at The Farm Pavilion at Old Edwards; Culinary Adventure Through Europe with Rosewood Market at The Inn at Half Mile Farm; The Ugly Dog Pub Late Night Hang Out.
Saturday, November 9 Events: The Hen House featuring Sallie’s Greatest Herbal Fruit Jams; Sip & Stroke at The Bascom; James Beard Award Winner Louis Osteen at Mountain Fresh Grocery; “The Staff Of Life in The Grandmother’s Hands” a cooking demonstration at Cyprus International Cuisine; “Midnight in Taipei” at Cyprus International Cuisine; Spanish Wine Pairing Dinner at Ruka’s Table; JUSTIN The Mood for a Fabulous Affair at Lakeside Restaurant; On the Verandah and Davis Family Vineyards Wine Dinner; Silver Oak Cellars and Twomey Wine Dinner “Life is a Cabernet” at Wolfgang’s Restaurant and Wine Bistro; “Just a Thimbleful,” a Bourbon Dinner at The Dog House; The Ugly Dog Pub Late Night Hang Out.
Sunday, November 10 Events: James Beard Award Winner Louis Osteen at Mountain Fresh Grocery; The Academy of Bartending-Bar Basics hosted by Holeman and Finch Public House of Atlanta at The Ugly Dog Pub.

Book Signing at the Book Nook

Meet author Angie Jenkins and pick up your personally signed copy of “Highlands, North Carolina… The Early Years Volume II” at  The Book Nook Saturday, November 9 from 2:00 P.M. until 4:00 P.M.

Meet author Angie Jenkins and pick up your personally signed copy of “Highlands, North Carolina… The Early Years Volume II” at The Book Nook Saturday, November 9 from 2:00 P.M. until 4:00 P.M.

Seventh generation Highlander Angie Jenkins’ new coffee table book, “Highlands, North Carolina…The Early Years Volume II,” is now available.
Jenkins’ first book, “Highlands, North Carolina…The Early Years,” came out in 2007. The book’s been a Highlands best-seller since it hit the shelves. It continues to be very much in demand, and is available in several area stores.
This second volume features another 200 pages of historic scenes in and around Highlands. Jenkins has been collecting photos and working on the book since May 2012, a real labor of love for her. She is thrilled to also feature in her new book a large number of early Highlands photos from the Earle Young Jr. Collection, courtesy of David Young. The book is priced at $49.95.
Jenkins is a direct descendant of Barak and Mary Nicholson Norton, early pioneers of the region, who settled in Whiteside Cove around 1820. The family moved to Highlands soon after the town was founded in 1875.
Jenkins’ Highlands ancestors have served as postmaster, taught at Highlands School, owned the Central House (now Madison’s Restaurant), Highlands House (now Highlands Inn), the Norton House (now Main Street Inn), The Hall House, which was located on in the block of Fifth, Chestnut, Sixth, and Horse Cove Road, Anderson Brother’s Café, Highlands Drug Store, Highlands Texaco, Anderson’s 5 & 10 (later changing its name to Highlands Variety Store), and also the Sears Catalog Agency and Radio Shack in more recent years. The family was also instrumental in the development of both the Episcopal Church of the Incarnation and First Presbyterian Church.
Jenkins herself has served as organist at First Presbyterian Church for the past 37 years, in addition to teaching preschool music classes at several area preschools for many years. Her children and grandchildren, who all live in the Highlands area, represent the family’s eighth and ninth generations.

Camels at the Parade

A trio of photogenic camels return to add a dash of exotic flair to the Highlands Olde Mountain Christmas Parade, Saturday, December 7.

A trio of photogenic camels return to add a dash of exotic flair to the Highlands Olde Mountain Christmas Parade, Saturday, December 7.

For the past several years, spectators at the Highlands Olde Mountain Christmas Parade have watched with glee as a trio of camels sauntered down Main Street.
Yep, they will be here again in 2013. Omar, Noel, and Summer make their way from Danielsville, Georgia, a rural area about 20 miles north of Athens.
The camels are guests of our area thanks to the members of the Highlands United Methodist Church. Back in 2006, church members Sherry Janes and Gay Kattel brainstormed for unique ways to bring new members to the church. They fondly remembered hearing the Christmas story and how excited children were with the camels. After making numerous calls, Sherry found Beau and Michelle Kaye, who live on a 117-acre farm along with their camels and
a menagerie.
Michelle remembers Sherry’s first call. “Beau and I really had never taken the camels off the farm. They were just our pets. Sherry was very convincing. Before I knew it we had agreed to come to Highlands. After our first visit we
were hooked.”
It takes a strong hand to keep them in line. Camel handlers Ken Knight, Dennis Hall and Fred Motz have built up a rapport with each of their animals. Omar, the lead camel, weighs more than 3,000 pounds. Omar has an attitude and wants to be in charge.
Once the camels were scheduled, Sherry and the entire HUMC Igniting Ministries Team had to find a place for the camels to stay on Friday night. The camels were such a hit at the parade that they have become a mainstay for
every parade.
Come early and stake out your viewing spot on Main Street. The parade is Saturday, December 7 beginning at 11:00 A.M.

By Wiley Sloan

Annual Christmas Dinner

The Highlands Annual Christmas Dinner, set for Christmas Day at Highlands Country Club’s Hudson House, is a gift to the entire community.

The Highlands Annual Christmas Dinner, set for Christmas Day at Highlands Country Club’s Hudson House, is a gift to the entire community.

For the 13th year, the Highlands Annual Christmas Dinner will take place on Christmas Day to give Highlanders and visitors to the area a wonderful place to share a marvelous dinner with friends and family without the toil and fuss of planning, shopping, preparing and, worst of all, the big cleanup.
A traditional Christmas meal featuring turkey, ham, tenderloin, and all the sides we have come to expect prepared by Marty Rosenfield, owner of Lakeside Restaurant; Holly Roberts of Holly’s Kitchen; dessert maker extraordinaire Martha Porter; and with the now famous dressing of none other than Donna Woods. A glass of wine or other beverage will be included, and served at the beautiful Hudson House of the Highlands Country Club.
Serving will begin at 11:00 A.M. and continue until 5:00 P.M. by reservations only. Adults are $35, children under the age of 12 are $15, and kids five and under are free.
All proceeds go to local charities. Last year, we raised $31,000 for local nonprofits such as The Highlands-Cashiers Hospital; REACH of Macon County, Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Highlands, The Highlands School Library, The Highlands literacy Council, and many more. We are hoping for even bigger and better things this year.
Join us for dinner, and join us as sponsors. Put yours or your organization’s name on our donor recognition board as a “Candle” for $100, an “Ornament” for $250, a “Present” for $500, or a “Star” for $1000. We have been so lucky as to have had several of what we like to call “Superstars” who have contributed $2000 or more.
We will begin taking reservations November 10. To reserve, just call (828) 526-9419. Last year, we served over 400 people, so don’t get left out. Reserve early. See you then.

Contributed by Rick Siegel

Annual Christmas Carol Sing

The sanctuary of the First Presbyterian Church of Highlands is the perfect setting  for the Town Carol Sing.

The sanctuary of the First Presbyterian Church of Highlands is the perfect setting for the Town Carol Sing.

It’s almost a certainty that Highlands’ Olde Mountain Christmas Parade, set for Saturday, December 7, will have you humming Christmas carols non-stop. If that’s the case, take time for a leisurely lunch and then join your friends at the First Presbyterian Church of Highlands at 2:00 P.M.
Song Leader Stell Huie and pianist/organist Angie Jenkins will lead everyone in well-loved Christmas carols. Young and old alike celebrate the season in song at this annual event.
For years to come, your family will speak fondly of this favorite Christmas outing. The church is located at the corner of Fifth and Main Street, high on the hill.
Dress is casual. If you have questions, call the church office at (828) 526-3175.

By Wiley Sloan

Breakfast with Santa

Santa delights in greeting his youngest fans and reminding them of the promise at the heart of Christmas.

Santa delights in greeting his youngest fans and reminding them of the promise at the heart of Christmas.

Santa Claus will visit Highlands United Methodist Church for a breakfast with local children and those from far away at 8:30 A.M. Saturday, December 14.
After a delicious breakfast prepared by church volunteers, children will get to complete a holiday craft and listen to the traditional Nativity story.
Each child will have the opportunity to talk to Santa and tell him what they’re hoping to find this Christmas.
The suggested donation is $10 per family. Reservations should be made by calling the church no later than Monday, December 9, at (828) 526-3376.
Jennifer Forrester, Director of Children Ministries at HUMC, says, “The children will have plenty of time to share their Christmas list with Santa and to have pictures made. Make your reservations early and come out for a stellar holiday celebration with Santa.”
The church is located at 315 Main Street, the site of the Town Christmas Tree.

By Wiley Sloan

The Bascom’s Marketplace

Pat Taylor at a past event.

Pat Taylor at a past event.

The Bascom will host its fourth annual Artists’ Marketplace from 10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. November 29 and 30 at its Bascom Studio Barn.
Those who have shopped at this event in the past come back year-after-year to buy unique, handcrafted gifts created by regional artists. Pottery, jewelry, fiber art, paper creations, and more will fill the barn hall, and all are priced under $100. It makes checking off your gift list a rewarding experience for you, for gift recipients, for the artists, and for The Bascom.
Some of the participants will be doing live demos. Bring the kids. Bring the whole family to see this year’s exceptional display of affordable crafts, gallery exhibits of fine art and craft, and other events happening on The Bascom campus. Think of it as destination shopping.
Save the date and buy personal hand-crafted gifts for people you care about, without getting overwhelmed or exhausted by shopping mall madness. Be a pampered shopper at The Bascom’s Artists’ Marketplace. More than 30 artists are there to please, displaying their finest, from whimsy to classic. There’s something for everyone on your list.
If you are an artist and interested in being part of the event, contact Leila Griffith at lgriffith@thebascom.org or call The Bascom, (828) 526-4949 for more details.
Who wouldn’t cherish an exquisite gift, handmade-with-love, hand-selected by you? Make your purchases, then sit back and enjoy the oohs and ahs from family and friends this holiday season.

by Donna Rhodes

Christmas on the Green

Santa’s November 29 visit sets the stage for a  dazzling Christmas On the Green in Cashiers.

Santa’s November 29 visit sets the stage for a dazzling Christmas On the Green in Cashiers.

The Village Green will add holiday sparkle again this season with Christmas On the Green, from Thanksgiving weekend until January 6.
While strolling the park pathways near the crossroads in Cashiers, guests can enjoy a Festival of Trees decorated by local merchants and area organizations.
“The Festival of Trees brings together school children, individuals, businesses and agencies to showcase what is unique to our area,” says Ann Self, Executive Director of The Village Green.
Christmas On the Green begins Friday, November 29, with a visit by Santa and Mrs. Claus to the Gazebo of the Village Green from noon until 3:00 P.M. Warm drinks and tasty treats will also be available.
The highlight of that opening day will be the Cashiers Christmas Tree Lighting from 6:00-7:00 P.M. Families, friends and neighbors will gather to view The Village Green trimmed in lights, listen to a concert of holiday music and gather around the fire pit for S’Mores and More before the switch is turned on to light the 60-foot spruce in the center of the village of Cashiers.
“This is what The Village Green is all about: bringing people together to make meaningful memories and creating a place to foster the spirit of community,” said Jochen Lucke, Chairperson of The Village Green Board of Directors.
The Village Green is a 12-and-a-half-acre park at the crossroads of Highway 64 and Highway 107 in Cashiers. The Village Green preserves this land for the public’s recreational, cultural, educational and spiritual use. The Village Green is operated and maintained by a nonprofit organization of the same name and relies on the generosity of donors to provide events like Christmas On the Green to the public for free. For more information, visit villagegreencashiersnc.com.
Parking is available at the entrance near the Gazebo, off of Highway 64 East, and at the entrance to Village Commons on Frank Allen Road in Cashiers. Like The Village Green on Facebook or follow on Twitter @cashiersgreen.

Highlands-Cashiers Players

Highlands Cashiers Players will hold auditions for its winter production of “Weekend Comedy,” at 3:00 P.M. Sunday, November 17, at the Martin-Lipscomb Performing Arts Center on Chestnut Street in Highlands. If callbacks are required, they’ll be staged at the PAC at 6:00 P.M. Monday, November 18.
“Weekend Comedy” by Jeanne and Sam Bobrick, is the funny and insightful tale of a couple in their late 40s or early 50s and a couple in their mid- to late-20 who have accidentally rented the same cottage for a three-day weekend. They decide to share it.
Peggy Jackson, a 50-ish matron, has dragged her reluctant husband Frank, an office-supplies dealer, off for a long weekend in a remote cabin — with no phone, no newspapers, no television and no kids. Peggy has romance on her mind, while stick-in-the-mud Frank is dully wondering what they’re going to do all weekend. She finally gets him in the mood for romance, only to be interrupted by the arrival of Jill and Tony, a pair of twenty-somethings who’ve also rented the same cottage to celebrate their fourth anniversary of cohabitating.
To his wife’s chagrin, Frank insists that the younger couple stay for dinner. Ultimately, the two couples agree to share the one-bedroom, one-bathroom cabin for the weekend.
They start out having a good time together, but the close quarters and the differences between the two couples lead to inevitable frictions. The men, especially, have trouble reconciling each other’s point of view.
The resulting generational clash is rich in comedic possibilities and the play effortlessly riffs on the tag-team premise. “Weekend Comedy” will be staged Feb. 20-23, and Feb. 28-March 2.

Big Brothers/Big Sisters

Big Brothers Big Sisters has plenty to be grateful for during this season of reflection, thanks to two caring communities.

Big Brothers Big Sisters has plenty to be grateful for during this season of reflection, thanks to two caring communities.

Although we should give thanks all year long, tradition has us expressing it in November when Thanksgiving vacation and turkey dinner are prominent in our thoughts.
So Big Brothers Big Sisters would like to follow tradition this month and express its many thanks:
BBBS of Highlands gives thanks for all the support it’s received since 2004 that has enabled us to touch the lives of over 200 children in the community.
BBBS of Cashiers gives thanks for the community support which made it possible to have a great first year in operation.
Thank you to all the wonderful families that welcome our assistance in enriching their child’s life.
To the community volunteers, the “Bigs” who give their time and talents to mentor our children, helping them explore their interests or “sparks,” and search for their potential within. Little Moments…Big Magic.
Can’t offer enough praise and thanks for the great kids in our communities! To the teachers and staff of Highlands, Blue Ridge and Summit Schools, thank you very much for championing the BBBS program and being our partners.
Thank you to all the churches, organizations, foundations and individual sponsors that keep us going.
An organization cannot be successful without a strong and dedicated team. A big thank you to the Advisory Council members who volunteer their time supporting and promoting the BBBS mission. Especially the Chairs, Rick Siegel in Highlands and Eleanor Welling in Cashiers, who give above and beyond.
The calendar year may be winding down, but the school season is in full swing. If you have one hour a week to share with a child, BBBS has a great and rewarding opportunity for you. Consider becoming a mentor, we promise it will warm your heart and make you thankful that you did. Contact Debbie Lassiter or (828) 526-4044, or highlands@bbbswnc.org or cashiers@bbbswnc.org.

Contributed by Debbie Lassiter

 

A Visit to Highlands

chwaterfall

The splendor of Dry Falls was only one of the treasures offered on a whirlwind tour of Highlands.

Well-known for its culinary delights, charming shops, and magnificent mountain views, Highlands attracts visitors from around the country.

Our State Magazine recently coordinated a day tour of Highlands through the Highlands Chamber of Commerce, inviting 24 visitors from around North Carolina to explore the history, art, and nature of one of the most beautiful towns in North Carolina.

The Highlands Playhouse was the first stop on the tour, and included an introduction from the Highlands Historical Society — an active society intent on preserving and promoting the heritage of Highlands.

Historical Society President Ann Sullivan, Past President Wiley Sloan, and Archivist Sue Potts shared entertaining stories of founders Samuel Kelsey and C. C. Hutchinson, and provided details of the early structures currently located within the Historic Village. The Prince House, built in 1877, is the oldest house remaining in Highlands. Other stories included the rugged terrain and difficult travels that the early founders had to endure to reach the Highlands Plateau.

A splendid cabaret performance by performers Rachel Schimenti and Jimmy Lewis followed, entertaining the group with their favorite songs from classic and contemporary musicals. New this fall at the Highlands Playhouse is a winterized building and a 35-foot movie screen showing new movie releases.

The Bascom – A Center for the Visual Arts, was the next stop for a private tour and artist demonstrations. This six-building, six-acre campus features unique and diverse exhibitions, studio art instruction, and other cultural experiences. Featured exhibitions include “American Art Today: Figures,” showcasing prestigious two-dimensional and sculptural works of some 50 artists from throughout the nation, and greenhouse in the Loft Gallery, an installation of lightweight materials such as pipe cleaners, fabric, plastic, and thread weaving throughout the Loft.

After an enlightening morning and with hungry appetites all around, the group enjoyed a gourmet lunch provided by the Old Edwards Inn. German-born Chef Johannes Klapdohr introduced his organic farm-to-table culinary philosophy, describing it as “a carrot that tastes like a real carrot.” All of the menu items are prepared from ingredients grown organically in the Old Edwards Inn garden. Pecan-encrusted chicken, a fall salad with marinated garden vegetables and toasted pecans, butternut squash soup, heirloom tomato and grass-fed buffalo mozzarella salad, steamed potatoes and sautéed garden vegetables were just a few of the buffet menu items. The group finished off their meal with a white chocolate cake with marinated strawberries and whipped icing.

With bellies filled, the group headed just outside of Highlands on U.S. 64 to Dry Falls – a 75 foot waterfall within the Nantahala National Forest. This “walk-behind” waterfall features an upper viewing platform as well as a walkway underneath the falls — allowing visitors to stay “dry,” well, sort of. Dry Falls is easily accessible with a paved parking area, restrooms, and a short paved trail to the falls.

Rounding out the day was a visit to the Highlands Nature Center, including a private walking tour of the Botanical Gardens, filled with nearly 500 species of Southern Appalachia flora, connected by a series of trails and boardwalks. The ambiance and fresh air of the natural surroundings was extraordinary and the stories and backgrounds provided really amazed the group. The trail network in the Botanical Garden is part of the Highlands Plateau Greenway and the North Carolina Birding Trail.

Shopping, dining, and breathtaking views are not the only highlights in Highlands. The generous nature of the community pulling together to embrace the cultural arts, and to preserve their natural surroundings is a rare find for this hidden gem of a destination.

Contributed by Mary Anne Baker

 

 

Bartram Trail Conference

Members and guests of The Bartram Trail Conference will meet at The Mountain Retreat and Learning Center in Scaly Mountain on October 11-13 to learn more of the mountains that William Bartram, in his 1775 exploration, called “The Cherokee Mountains.”

On the evening of Friday, October 11, three Cherokee artists will demonstrate traditional crafts. Ramona Lossie will show river cane basket making, Mary Thompson will display the art of stamped pottery, and Sonny Ledford will demonstrate moccasin making and the use of the blowgun.

Tom Belt, Elder-in Residence and Cherokee Language Instructor at Western Carolina University leads off the Saturday morning session with a unique presentation entitled “A Cherokee Looks at William Bartram.” In addition, Dan Pittillo will lead a panel discussion of how the botany of the southern Appalachians has changed since the time of Bartram. Lamar Marshall, who has traced hundreds of miles of Cherokee trading paths and trails, will show the results of his study.

On Saturday afternoon, Tyler Howe, Historic Preservation Specialist with the Eastern Band of the Cherokee will speak on “The Cowee Townsite and Cherokee History” and Lamar Marshall will lead a driving tour through the portions of Macon County that Bartram called “the Vale of Cowee,” ending with a visit to the Cowee Mound.

Sunday’s activities include a morning hike to Scaly Mountain on the Bartram Trail, followed by a guided tour of the Bartram Garden at Highlands Biological Station.

The Bartram Trail Conference is a nationwide organization established in 1976 as part of America’s Bicentennial observance to locate and mark the route of the pioneering Philadelphia naturalist William Bartram (1739-1823) through eight southern states: North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana.

The North Carolina Bartram Trail Society, which built and maintains the seventy-five miles of the Bartram Trail from the Georgia line to Cheoah Bald, is cosponsoring the conference.

For more information, visit the Bartram Trail Conference’s website bartramtrail.org/pages/2013conf or e-mail Jim Kautz at jrkautz@frontier.com

Contributed by Joe Pilkington

 

 

Highlands Arts and Crafts Show

The Highlands Women’s Club celebrates the 30th Highlands Arts and Crafts Show on

Saturday, October 12.

Approximately 100 vendors will fill the Highlands Recreation Park located at 400 North Fourth Street, offering a wide spectrum of arts and crafts, and foods of every variety.  Enjoy free admission and free parking.

The show opens at 9:00 A.M. and closes at 5:00 P.M.  There’s no better place to find delicious home-baked cakes, pies and breads.  You will marvel at the many jams, jellies and preserves. All the home-canned items will bring back memories of your grandmother’s well house where she stored her canning.  Delectable barbecue sauces and rubs sit side-by-side with herbs and spices.

Chocolate lovers always made a beeline to the Scaly Mountain Women’s Club Booth.  They’re famous for their fudge, brownies, chocolate covered strawberries, cakes, and, always, unbelievable chocolate surprises.

Painted furniture, stools, and chairs plus beautiful hand-turned bowls, exquisite rocking horses and cradles, eye-catching rocking chairs, bark picture frames, and birdhouses, are offered here.  There’s furniture for the home or the porch, shabby chic or refined.

Choose from hand-blown glass, unique Christmas ornaments, stained glass, gourds, birdhouses, Native American jewelry, and jewelry of every description. Woven scarves, garment bags, placemats, runners, and purses — these are just some of the clever craft items you’ll find at the show.

If you have a botanical fancy, consider the money plant, hydrangea, and Chinese lanterns share display space with dried flowers of every description.

Aromas from the kitchen tantalize you as Fressers’ Eatery serves up their breakfast and lunch fare.

By Wiley Sloan

 

 

Fifth Annual Leaf Festival in Cashiers

Cashiers-Leaf-Fest5-2The Greater Cashiers Area Merchants Association will stage the 2013 Leaf Festival on Columbus Day weekend, October 11-13, at the Village Green and Commons in Cashiers.

This year’s festival expects to welcome around 100 artisans and merchants scattered throughout the Village Green and Commons park, located directly in the center of Cashiers adjacent to the crossroads of Highways 64 and 107. There will also be plenty of food and drinks.

Highlighting this year’s musical lineup is a special Friday night, October 11, concert by Deja Vu, a Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young tribute band. The Friday night concert will begin at 7:30 P.M. and end at 10:15 P.M. Gates open at 6:30 P.M. This will be the only event of the weekend requiring a purchased ticket. There will be a full cash bar, including a moonshine margarita bar and a culinary cafe. Everyone is encouraged to dress in their favorite clothing from the 1960s. Concert ticket prices are $25 for general admission and $65 for VIP tickets, which includes valet parking, a reserved table, and a dinner voucher at the culinary cafe. Advanced ticket sale locations are at Bear Paw Design/Robins Nest and Midnight Farms. There will be a presale only for VIP tickets, as a limited number of tables are available. To purchase tickets online, visit dejavucashiers.eventbrite.com. No pets, coolers or chairs will be allowed at this one event only.

Live music is scheduled from noon to 5:00 P.M. on Saturday and Sunday by 12 acts on two different stages. All of these shows are free and open to the public. Most of these performers are local and regional acts, ranging from jazz, to blues, Americana, bluegrass, rock, soul, and funk.

Sunday’s festival finale features popular new regional band Soldier’s Heart with special guest Darren Nicholson of the WNC award-winning bluegrass band Balsam Range. Don’t miss this special one of a kind performance.

For more information, visit visitcashiersvalley.com, e-mail info@visitcashiersvalley.com, or call (828) 743-8428.

Contributed by Kelly Donaldson