Category Archives: Events in Highlands NC and Cashiers NC

Dahlia Gala Success

Left to Right: Lee Havron (blue ribbon in water lily category); Dr. Patti Wheeler (red ribbon in ball and pom pom category);   Glenville Wesleyan Church, represented by Reverend Campbell (blue ribbon in  ball and pom pom category  and  Dr. Jim Askew (blue ribbon in ball and pom pom category).

Left to Right: Lee Havron (blue ribbon in water lily category); Dr. Patti Wheeler (red ribbon in ball and pom pom category);
Glenville Wesleyan Church, represented by Reverend Campbell (blue ribbon in ball and pom pom category
and Dr. Jim Askew (blue ribbon in ball and pom pom category).

When Joyce Franklin first suggested the idea of a festival honoring the beautiful dahlias that grace the gardens of homes throughout the Highlands area, her friends were not sure if the community would embrace this event or not.
Joyce’s enthusiasm and her persuasive nature allowed her to convince her friends that they needed to “jump on board and help with this event.”
Now five years later the Highlands Historical Society Dahlia Festival is a much-anticipated event.
In addition to the Flower Show, HHS supporters have made the Patrons’ Party a “must-be-there” event. Tickets sell out quickly. The festive venues have varied each year with one venue being an outdoor garden event, another being at OEI’s Farm and the last two years being at the Highlands Country Club. In 2016 party goers will attend at Highlands Falls Country Club. Lively Mariachi music and delicious food are combined with popular beverages to create a
much-anticipated event.
This year the Highlands Civic Center was abuzz with more than 70 volunteers busily accepting beautiful dahlias from local growers who brought their flowers for the Flower Show competition. By 11:00 A.M. the entries were categorized and the show judges were busy evaluating the many blossoms. It’s so exciting to see all of the entries – from youngsters who are entering their first show, to seasoned growers who can tell you the specific names of each of their many blooms. Some people enter a single bloom; others brought a dozen or more. Especially eye-catching are the beautiful elaborate dahlia arrangements that are submitted by the hobbyists and the professionals.
Beginning at 1:00 P.M. the visitors flooded the civic center to view the many beautiful blossoms. Festival Chairperson Kitty Moore says, “We were so pleased that we had approximately 400 guests tour the Exhibit Hall to see the blossoms that the judges had eyed with great scrutiny. The public really supported us and that is much appreciated.”
Ribbons adorned the Best-of-the-Best. Best of Show went to the residents of Fidelia Eckerd Center for their entry submitted on their behalf by Ann Maxwell. Guests quickly grabbed up the beautiful dahlias arrangements that were being offered for sale.
The Dahlia Festival is the major fund-raising event for the Highlands Historical Society. All funds raised underwrite the Society’s many programs, plus provide funds for the maintenance and restoration of the Prince House (Highlands’ oldest residence within the town limits) and the Historic Museum. Thanks to everyone who made this event such a resounding success – the many volunteers, the dahlia growers who so generously shared their blossoms, and the many guests who came to view the beautiful flowers.
Plans are already under way for next year’s event. Watch for the details as they are announced.

by Wiley Sloan

Read More, You Must

While the Empire would most likely be displeased, Star Wars Reads Day — a celebration of a galaxy far, far away and the joy of reading — is back.
The Literacy Council of Cashiers and Albert Carlton-Cashiers Community Library will stage Star Wars Reads, an exciting carnival of activities for kids, at 3:00 P.M. Sunday, November 1, at the library.
The event is suitable for all children, with emphasis on those in third, fourth and fifth grades. There’ll be booths, contests and surprises. Participants can expect Star Wars-themed Lego stations, crafts, and origami.
Since it’s sponsored by both the Literacy Council of Cashiers and Albert Carlton-Cashiers Community Library, Star Wars Reads will spotlight books and storytelling that’ll build enthusiasm about reading. Star Wars Reads is a global event supported by Disney-Lucasfilm Press, Marvel, Abrams, Chronicle, Del Rey, DK, Quirk Books, Scholastic, Workman, Egmont, Studio Fun, Phoenix International Publishing, and many more.
For more information, call the library at (828) 743-0215.

by Luke Osteen

Hard Candy Christmas

Larry Haskett and  the A&E tree farm will bring fresh  evergreen wreaths and table arrangements as well as the big tree in the truck tunnel.

Larry Haskett and the A&E tree farm will bring fresh
evergreen wreaths and table arrangements as well as the big tree in the truck tunnel.

The 28th Annual Hard Candy Christmas Arts & Crafts Show is a Mountain Christmas Tradition.
Always the Friday and Saturday after Thanksgiving, the dates are November 27 and 28. Hours are 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. both days. This annual event is held in the spacious Ramsey Center on the Western Carolina University campus in Cullowhee, North Carolina.
This year’s featured artist is William McKinnis of the Country Tin Shoppe in Winston-Salem. He has been preserving the vanishing art of tinsmithing for 12 years. His custom pieces will include a variety of handcrafted lanterns, candleholders, and ornaments that would have been found in Early American homes. He also has “strip art” that portrays holiday themes.
Over 100 other craftsmen and artists will be joining Bill. Customers looking for handcrafted gifts at great prices are always happy to see what their favorite potter, woodcrafter and glass artist have new this year.
They come early looking for knitted winter wear and something snuggly for the new grandchild. There will be plenty of stocking stuffers, specialty sweets, and designer jewelry.The ornament collectors always find a unique Santa, snowman, or angels.
The mountain beekeeper has candles, ornaments, and this year’s honey.
In the Heritage Category, see goat-milk soap, holiday quilting, and folk dolls with hickory nut heads. The Chamber’s Kooky Chickens Collection will spread their cheer.
Macon County native Ronnie Evans will be strumming the carols we grew up with and selling his CDs for holiday listening.
A weekend pass for adults is $4.50. Children under 12 are free. Free convenient parking and concessions will be available.
For info, go to MountainArtisans.net or call (828) 524-3405.

Rotary Bingo

You don’t need to speak Spanish (but are welcome to if you can) when you come to the Highlands Community Building on Thursday, November 5, to support Rotary Bingo, which will be raising funds for the Highlands Bolivian Mission.
Games begin promptly at 6:30 P.M.
For more than 18 years, Dr. John Baumrucker and his wife Joanna and their many friends have been supporting the people of Montero, Bolivia. In addition to improving the medical care of the area, the mission has built and supported a foster home for young boys from ages 4 to 18. They’ve taught homebuilding and reached out to prisoners who need to hear the word of God. They’ve recruited their friends and fellow medical professionals to help in this heart-filled ministry, too.
Throughout the years, a key supporter has been Highlands United Methodist Church. They have also been joined by people throughout the Highlands community. Several years ago a team from the First Presbyterian Church of Highlands began building water systems
in Bolivia.
Bingo is one of the most popular events on the Highlands social calendar. At only $1 per card, per game, where else can you have so much fun for so little expense? The Grand Finale is Game 15, where the first person to fill their entire card wins the jackpot. If you fill your card in 55 calls or less, the jackpot is huge. Even if it takes more than 55 calls, the take is good. Of course, many winners donate their prizes back to the non-profit that’s being honored.
You can add an extra level of support for the mission by being a Table Sponsor. Just purchase a full page ad for $50 or a half page for only $25. It’s a great way to advertise your business. If you don’t have a business but want to support the mission, just call Dr. Baumrucker at (828) 526-3605 and let him create a personalized ad for you.
No matter your age, you’ll have a great night of fun at Rotary Bingo. Enjoy free refreshments in a family atmosphere. Bingo is one of the many ways the Rotary Club of Highlands supports non-profit organizations in the Highlands area.

by Wiley Sloan

Christmas on the Green

The Village Green in Cashiers sparkles with the magic of the season during Christmas on the Green, launching with a gala celebration, Friday, November 27.

The Village Green in Cashiers sparkles with the magic of the season during Christmas on the Green, launching with a gala celebration, Friday, November 27.

You may have seen The Village Green in bloom in summer.
Have you seen it glow in the winter? Join us for “Christmas On the Green,” Cashiers favorite holiday tradition.
The 12.5 acre park in the heart of Cashiers will feature thousands of twinkling lights on trees sponsored by local merchants and organizations from Thanksgiving weekend until New Year’s Day. This is the fourth year that The Village Green will be making spirits merry and bright.
Christmas On the Green kicks off the holiday season with an afternoon and evening of festivities Friday, November 27. Santa and Mrs. Claus will visit with children of all ages from 2:00 until 5:00 P.M. at the Gazebo of The Village Green at the crossroads of Highways 64 and 107 in Cashiers.
Bring your wishes and a camera for a photo with the jolly couple. The evening continues with holiday music and strolling carolers for the Cashiers Christmas Tree Lighting celebration from 5:00 P.M. until 6:00 P.M. “Christmas On the Green” will also feature warm drinks and tasty treats, including s’more-making around The Village Green fire pit. The magic holiday sparkle happens when the switch is flipped to illuminate the beautiful 60-foot spruce in the center of the village of Cashiers.
“The mission of The Village Green is to enhance the lifestyle of residents and visitors to the Cashiers area,” says executive director Ann Self. “Traditions like Christmas On the Green preserve the charm and legacy of our mountain community.”
The Village Green is a privately conserved park for free, public enjoyment that provides a window into the pleasurable pursuits of the area.
“However, many people do not realize that The Village Green is not a government-funded park,” says Self. The Village Green depends on donors to help fund all the fun and interesting activities like Christmas On the Green as well as maintain the park. For more information, visit villagegreencashiersnc.com.
Parking is available at the entrance near the Gazebo, off of Highway 64 East, and at the entrance to Village Commons on Frank Allen Road in Cashiers. Like The Village Green on Facebook or follow on Twitter @cashiersgreen.

Contributed by Ann Self

Hospice House Christmas Jam

The Highlands Performing Arts Center will be rocking on Saturday night, December 5, as Asheville-based Emporium plays your favorite tunes.
This multi-talented group is known for their dance music – classic, rock, disco, or funk. They even play beach music and current hits. If you can stay in your seat and keep your feet on the floor, I’ll be surprised.
The doors open at 4:30 P.M. and the music starts at 5:00 P.M. Don’t delay. Tickets purchased by November 9 are $25; after that the price increases to $30. All funds raised go to support the Hospice House of Western North Carolina. You may have seen Emporium at Harrah’s Cherokee or this year’s Mountain High Music and BBQ Festival.
Emporium was created by three brothers – Ray, Rick, and David Travis in the 1980’s. Growing up in a musical family, they watched their father entertain friends on his trumpet, French horn, or ukulele. When he discovered a blue and white Stellar guitar in the 1950’s, he added that to his repertoire. As The Beatles took the country by storm, these boys were just learning chords but it wasn’t long before their talents blossomed. With Ray on the bass guitar, Rick playing rhythm, lead, and acoustic guitar, and David lead guitar they provide the core of the band. Years of playing while in high school honed their skills
Today’s band includes three additional talented musicians –Tricia Esposito on vocals and percussion, Tim Hawkins on drums, and Barry Bryson vocals, keyboards, guitar, and harmonica. Tricia grew up in Chicago with a grandmother singing to her and her dad performing in musical theatre. After debuting in a high school talent show, she launched her career. She performed with various bands before joining Emporium a few years ago.
Barry Bryson actually made his debut with the band by stepping on stage from the audience at one of their concerts at The Grove Park Inn. The Travis Brothers were so impressed with his talents that they knew he would bring much to their group.
Growing up in a military family, drummer Tim Hawkins caught the “drummer bug” when he was allowed to stay up late one night to see “The Tonight Show.” There he saw Buddy Rich and the rest is history.
While you enjoy the music of this talented group, you will also have the chance to support Hospice House of Western North Carolina even more. There will be wonderful items awaiting your bid at the Silent Auction. Go one step further and become a sponsor. For sponsorship information, e-mail bringingit2life@gmail.com.
The Highlands PAC is located at 507 Chestnut Street (just four blocks from Main Street). For tickets, go to highlandspac.net or call (828) 526-9047.

by Wiley Sloan

HCP’s Gift to You

The Highlands Cashiers Players have been delighting audiences with their annual holiday presentations for years.
It’s a free program and a gift to the community, a way of saying “thank you” for its support. This year it will be held at the Highlands Performing Arts Center on Thursday, December 17
at 7:00 P.M.
As has been their tradition in the past, the Players will once again offer a dramatized reading as well as special music. The reading is taken from Betty Smith’s novel, “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.” It’s a poignant literary classic that tells the story of Francie Nolan and her brother Neeley, growing up in an impoverished neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York” in the early 1900s. The music of this year’s Holiday program will be presented by the men and women of the new 40-voice regional chorus Mountain Voices.
The group recently debuted at the Smoky Mountain Performing Arts Center in Franklin and is directed by Beverly Barnett and accompanied by pianist Arthea Brimmer. After the program, audience members are invited to enjoy refreshments downstairs in the PAC reception room.
No tickets are required, so wear your best Christmas sweater and bring the family to the annual Highlands Cashiers Players Holiday Reading at the Highlands Performing Arts Center on Chestnut Street.

by Jenny King

Olde Mountain Christmas

Highlands’ Olde Mountain Christmas Parade, small town spirit at its most charming, will wind through downtown at 11:00 A.M.  Saturday, December 5. To participate or for more information, call (828) 526-2112.

Highlands’ Olde Mountain Christmas Parade, small town spirit at its most charming, will wind through downtown at 11:00 A.M.
Saturday, December 5. To participate or for more information, call (828) 526-2112.

Who doesn’t love a parade, particularly a Christmas Parade that embodies the spirit of community and small town, Main Street America?
Highlands’ annual Olde Mountain Christmas Parade, held this year at 11:00 A.M. Saturday, December 5, is one parade that showcases the heart and soul of community.
Staged entirely by local groups, churches, businesses, fire departments, friends, neighbors, and families, this parade celebrates both the community and the Christmas spirit. Folks young and old gather on Main Street wrapped in warm sweaters, rosy cheeks glowing in anticipation of the parade Grand Marshall leading off a long line of wondrous entries. It’s recommended that you get there early to claim a prime viewing spot and have a chance to visit with your friends and neighbors.
You’ll see homemade floats that took long hours of volunteer labor and good times to assemble. Many parade participants say that the hours spent in preparation were as meaningful as marching in the parade itself. Joining the fun will be at least one marching band, horses, motorcycles, all-terrain vehicles, dogs (both with and without Santa hats), fire trucks, rescue vehicles, classic cars, the Highlands School Homecoming Court and athletic teams, local politicians, Smokey The Bear, possibly a camel or two, and the ever-popular and always well-rehearsed crowd favorites, the dancing ladies of the Highlands Garden Club. Ending it with a bang and to the delight of our youngest spectators are Santa and Mrs. Claus, who always mark their calendars so they can attend. Rumor has it that’s one of Santa’s favorite parades.
If you are part of a group that would like to be included in the lineup, contact the Highlands Chamber of Commerce at (828) 526-2112. There is no entry fee and the more the merrier, so don’t be shy, join the fun today. Please note that Santa is already in the lineup, though, so no need to invite him to be in your entry.

by Mary Jane McCall | Photo by Sarah Valentine

Cashiers Christmas Parade

The Cashiers Christmas Parade, set for noon Saturday, December 12, showcases the generous spirit and deep pride of a Little Community  with an Enormous Heart.

The Cashiers Christmas Parade, set for noon Saturday, December 12, showcases the generous spirit and deep pride of a Little Community
with an Enormous Heart.

The 41st Annual Cashiers Christmas Parade continues to grow and delight onlookers with its hometown flair and wide variety of entries.
The parade begins at noon on Saturday, December 12, and promises a new theme and lots of fun for the whole family. Spectators will enjoy floats, vintage cars, a marching band, and of course, many four-legged friends sure to boost everyone’s Christmas Spirit.
The parade route starts at the Cornucopia Restaurant on Highway 107 South then travels north to the Cashiers Crossroads. From there it winds its way west on Highway 64 to Frank Allen Road, where it terminates at the Cashiers Community Center. Thanks to Cashiers Cares, there will be a community lunch served afterwards. Prizes will be awarded for best entries ranging from the Cashiers Christmas Star to the Fruitcake Award and, to honor the local Choose & Cut industry, the theme for this year’s parade is “O Christmas Tree.”
The parade will feature Spirit of our Community Award Winners – Volunteer, Citizen, Educator, and Business Person of the Year and will be led by the selected Grand Marshal.
Spectators are invited to enjoy the festivities along the parade route or watch the event as it is streamed live on the internet at SapphireValley.com. In the off chance of inclement weather (rain), the parade will commence on Sunday, December 13, at 1:00 P.M. For more information or to register to participate, visit cashiersareachamber.com or email info@cashiersareachamber.com.

by Jenny King | Photo by Sarah Valentine

Breakfast with Santa

Santa Claus will visit Highlands United Methodist Church at 8:30 A.M. Saturday, December 12, to share breakfast with his friends, hear their whispered wishes, and pose for photos. Call the church office at (828) 526-3376 for reservations.

Santa Claus will visit Highlands United Methodist Church at 8:30 A.M. Saturday, December 12, to share breakfast with his friends, hear their whispered wishes, and pose for photos. Call the church office at (828) 526-3376 for reservations.

To me, there is nothing more invigorating than watching children as they wait for their turn on Santa’s lap. Make sure that your children or grandchildren get their chance to tell Santa what they want under the tree.
Bring them to breakfast at the Highlands United Methodist Church on Saturday, December 12, from 8:30 to 10:30 A.M.
Everyone will have the chance to enjoy a delicious breakfast. After large stacks of pancakes with maple syrup, the kids will be wired, but that’s just to be expected.
Christmas wouldn’t be Christmas without your favorite carol. Join in making a joyful noise as folks young and old sing their favorite songs. Ask anyone who has joined in this event and you’ll hear heart-warming stories.
This is the perfect time to make tons of photos. The children will grow up faster than you think, so dress them in festive holiday attire and snap away. Last year some kids arrived in their holiday p.j.’s, others in holiday sweaters and some young girls even sported ruffles and lace. This is just one big “come as you are party,” so dress comfortably.
The suggested donation is $10 per family, but don’t let that stand in your way if things are tight this year. Reservations should be made by calling the church no later than Monday, December 9, at (828) 526-3376. Make your reservations early and come out for a stellar holiday celebration with Santa.
The church is located at 315 Main Street, immediately behind the Town Christmas Tree.

by Wiley Sloan

Christmas Carol Sing

There will be a Christmas Carol Sing at First Presbyterian Church at 2:00 P.M. on Saturday, December 5, after the parade. Stell Huie will be the song leader with Angie Jenkins at the piano. If you enjoy singing familiar Christmas carols, you will definitely want to make this a part of your Christmas tradition. The church is located at the corner of Main and Fifth Streets. Handicapped accessible entrances are located on Fifth Street and on Church Street.

Contributed by Angie Jenkins | Photo by Marty Boon

Highlands Tree Lighting

Highlands_nc_christmas_tree_lightingThanksgiving. That special holiday wrapped in the tantalizing aroma of roasting turkeys when families gather around a warm hearth giving thanks for all their blessings. Good food, laughter, reminiscing about good times past and better times to come make this holiday special.
Family time, that’s what it’s all about and Highlands’ own Christmas Tree Lighting caps the Thanksgiving weekend off on a joyful note. The festivities this year will begin on Saturday, November 28, in front of Highlands United Methodist Church at 6:30 P.M.
Main Street is transformed into a festive wonderland with families bundled in their warm sweaters, children gleefully anticipating the arrival of old St. Nick, and neighbors sipping hot chocolate and catching up with friends or making new ones. When the enormous tree is lit, we realize the season of magic is upon us. It all adds up to a holiday tradition that is cherished by young and old.
The fun starts with caroling that everyone’s invited to join. A small ceremony features readings from the Bible and storytelling. Cookies and hot chocolate are the perfect complement to a frosty evening. Winners of the merchant’s window contest and the children’s art contest will be announced. Sweatshirts with the winning artwork will be available for sale. Santa will make one of his first appearances of the season, a highlight for his many fans.
To prepare for the crowds, Main Street will be closed between Second and Fourth streets beginning at 5:30 P.M.
The Highlands Downtown Tree Lighting is sponsored by the Highlands Chamber of Commerce. For more information, call the Highlands Visitor Center at (828) 526-2112.

by Mary Jane McCall | Photo by Sarah Valentine

Photos with Santa

Even with his hectic holiday schedule, Santa makes time  for visiting with his fans in Highlands – look for him on the lawn of the First Baptist Church, Friday after Thanksgiving and Saturdays in December before Christmas from  11:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M.

Even with his hectic holiday schedule, Santa makes time
for visiting with his fans in Highlands – look for him on the lawn of the First Baptist Church, Friday after Thanksgiving and Saturdays in December before Christmas from
11:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M.


Santa is coming to town!
To most folks that means that they’d better be making preparations for his once-a-year visit on Christmas Eve.
Highlanders know a well-kept secret about Santa’s schedule that many don’t. As busy as Santa is, he still needs to take some time to kick back, relax, and review that Naughty or Nice List. Things are much too chaotic at the North Pole for such important work, so Santa has a weekend place in Highlands. Here he enjoys the mountain air, relaxed pace, a hot cup of coffee on a chilly morning, and time to
work uninterrupted.
Having spent so much time in the area, Santa couldn’t help but notice that a large proportion of kids on the Nice List are right here in Highlands.
“I’d like to meet these kids personally,” he said, and so was born the idea of Saturday photos with Santa.
This year he’ll be on the lawn of the First Baptist Church on Main Street on Friday after Thanksgiving and Saturdays in December before Christmas from 11:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. The exception is December 5, when rumor has it that he will be a special guest at the Christmas Parade. Following the parade, he’ll be on the church lawn until 3:00 P.M. Here you can review your wish list with Santa and have a photo taken so you can always remember that special visit with Santa. More than one family Christmas card photo has been taken with Santa on these special Saturday visits. Santa will also make an appearance at the annual Christmas Tree Lighting on November 28.
If you have questions about Santa’s busy schedule or the events that mark Highlands’ Holiday Season – the Olde Mountain Christmas Parade or the worship schedules of local churches – contact the Highlands Visitor Center at (828) 526-2112.

by Mary Jane McCall

Community Chorale

There’s no better way to get into the true spirit of Christmas than attending the Highlands Community Christian Chorale’s annual concert on both Saturday, December 12, and Sunday, December 13, at Community Bible Church.
This year’s performance is entitled, “O Come, Emmanuel,” and it tells the story of the Advent of Jesus Christ through music. There’ll be a reception following both performances.
The concerts will feature both Christmas classics, as well as newer compositions. Some of the selected songs include:
• “Gloria in Excelsis Deo,” a modern piece composed by Mack Wilberg, one of the primary composers and directors of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. This is a beautiful piece that invites listeners to begin the journey to Christ’s birth.
• “O Magnum Mysterium,” a Latin text that’s been set to music by many of history’s greatest sacred composers. This particular setting is by Morten Lauridsen, a 20th century composer.
• “Excerpts from George Frideric Handel’s ‘Messiah,’” one of the most beloved Christmas traditions. The chorale’s excerpts from this work will include selections for both soloists and chorus and classics like “Glory to God,” “There Were Shepherds Abiding in the Field,” and, of course, the “Hallelujah Chorus.”
This year the Chorale is performing under the direction of Cody Turner, Worship and Arts Pastor at CBC. Cody received his Bachelor of Music in Church Music at Lee University. The Chorale is made up of talented singers from across the Plateau. Their blend of melodic voices has long filled the halls of Highlands’ churches to honor God during this season of the year. This year’s performance will be the Chorale’s 21st year. The singers practice from the Monday after Labor Day until
the concert.
Be prepared to share a small donation to help the Chorale offset the cost of music. Come and be blessed by this special event.

by Wiley Sloan

Hard Candy Christmas

All of the elements of a cherished mountain Christmas are available at the 29th Annual Hard Candy Christmas Arts & Crafts Show,  November 27-28 at Western Carolina University.

All of the elements of a cherished mountain Christmas are available at the 29th Annual Hard Candy Christmas Arts & Crafts Show, November 27-28 at Western Carolina University.

The 29th Annual Hard Candy Christmas Arts & Crafts Show is a Mountain Christmas Tradition in this neck of the woods.
It’ll be staged from 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Friday and Saturday, November 27-28, in the spacious Ramsey Center on the Western Carolina University campus in Cullowhee, North Carolina.
This year’s featured artist is William McKinnis at Country Tin Shoppe from Winston-Salem, North Carolina. For the last 12 years, he’s been preserving tin-smithing, a vanishing heritage art. His art pieces will include a variety of handcrafted lanterns, candleholders, and ornaments that would have been found in Early American homes.
One hundred other craftsmen will be joining Bill for this much anticipated art and craft show.
Customers looking for handcrafted gifts at great prices are always happy to see what their favorite potter, woodcrafter, and glass artist has new. They come early looking for knitted winter wear and something snuggly for the new grandchild. There will be plenty of stocking stuffers, speciality sweets, and designer jewelry. The ornament collectors always find a unique Santa, snowman, or angel. The A&E Tree Farm will be bringing fresh evergreen wreaths and table arrangements as well as the Big Tree. The Mountain Beekeeper has candles and this year’s honey.
Ronnie Evans will be strumming the carols we grew up with and selling his CDs for holiday listening.
Admission is $4.50 for adults; children under 12 are free. There’s free convenient parking and concessions on site.
For more information, visit MountainArtisans.net or call Doris Hunter at (828) 524-3405.

A Biergarten Blast

For an authentic Bavarian Oktoberfest, look no further than  Old Edwards Inn and Spa. The Biergarten shines at the center  of a celebration that spans the entire month.

For an authentic Bavarian Oktoberfest, look no further than Old Edwards Inn and Spa. The Biergarten shines at the center of a celebration that spans the entire month.

Oktoberfest was not originally held as a festival for all things beer.
On October 12, 1810, Crown Prince Ludwig wed Princess Therese of Saxony- Hildeburghausen and the citizens of Munich were invited to celebrate. The following year horse races were added as well as an agricultural show to boost Bavarian agriculture.
Believe it or not, beer was not the highlight! But now when you hear the word “Oktoberfest,” you immediately think beer and brats, right? You certainly wouldn’t be wrong; although at Old Edwards Inn and Spa in downtown Highlands, Oktoberfest goes well beyond the norm.
The entire month of October will be a celebration of Bavaria at the hands of Executive Chef Johannes Klapdohr and his dedicated staff of culinary artists. Klapdohr was born in Germany into a family of four generations of hoteliers, restaurateurs, and chefs. His culinary career is a delicious mélange of cuisines, tastes, and techniques from around the globe. He studied in some of the finest hotels and restaurants and became Executive Chef at Old Edwards Inn and Spa in 2009. He believes in “honest” food and his ultimate passion is to nurture, develop, and create sustainable, healthy cuisine that is uncompromised and environmentally responsible.
In keeping with the tradition of celebrating local agriculture, his special Oktoberfest menus will combine the freshest of ingredients from Old Edwards’ own gardens and greenhouses with Klapdohr’s Bavarian heritage. Begin your festivities in The Wine Garden, which has been transformed into a Biergarten. Enjoy a steaming mug of Gluhwein, a popular fall and winter beverage in Germany, better known to us in America as mulled wine. Live music will entertain you throughout the resort and you’ll have the opportunity to try cocktails created just for the month of October. It is a time of celebration when the weather is cool, the skies are clear, and the colors of autumn become Mother Nature’s best work.
For more information visit them at oldedwardsinn.com/Oktoberfest.

Jewelry, Casual to Elegant

Acorns Boutique will spotlight the dazzling works of jewelry designer Julie Vos with an exclusive trunk show, October 9 through 11.

Acorns Boutique will spotlight the dazzling works of jewelry designer Julie Vos with an exclusive trunk show, October 9 through 11.

Jewelry designer Julie Vos launched her collection in 2006 and has become a leading name in the jewelry market for classic, affordable luxury pieces.
Her gorgeous and elegant pieces have appeared in Marie Claire, Lucky, InStyle, Oprah Magazine, Real Simple, Martha Stewart, and Vogue.com. Join Acorns Boutique on Main Street Highlands for the Julie Vos Jewelry trunk show, October 9 through 11.
This completely self-taught designer fell in love with making things people wear and love.
She says, “It’s like raising your baby, and sending it out into the world. You feel so much affection.”
Her designs are striking in their simplicity, highlighting the bold stones and pearls she chooses to mix with luxe gold and silver. Given that one of her self-proclaimed artistic influences is Bob Dylan, her work shines with a touch of eccentricity. Chain bracelets mix well with bangles and chunky cuffs and are affordably priced. Her necklaces shimmer and layer easily to highlight any fashion from casual to elegant.
Julie Vos rings come in a range of styles. Choose from chunky cocktail rings for a big, bold statement or mix and match her smaller stacking rings for a variety of combinations.
Her earring collections are not limited to pierced alone, but offer a wide range of clip-ons, too. Affordable luxury says it all when describing the work of Julie Vos.
See for yourself at the trunk show October 9 through 11. Visit Acorns Boutique at 465 Main Street in Highlands. For more information on upcoming trunk shows, visit OldEdwardsInn.com/DesignerTrunkShows or call
(828) 787-2640.

North Pole Favorites

World-famous artisan Lisa Kelechava will be signing her Joy to the World creations at the Christmas Tree in Highlands, Saturday, October 10.  The gallery also spotlights the magic at the heart of Halloween with its beguiling collection of ornaments and little treasures.

World-famous artisan Lisa Kelechava will be signing her Joy to the World creations at the Christmas Tree in Highlands, Saturday, October 10. The gallery also spotlights the magic at the heart of Halloween with its beguiling collection of ornaments and little treasures.

What’s your favorite Christmas memory?
Is it presents beneath a festive tree, the sound of Christmas carols, lighted candles?
When you enter The Christmas Tree on Main Street in Highlands, you’ll experience all of these and more. The Christmas Tree, a Highlands’ tradition for 40 years, is owned and operated by Trisha and Bob Kieltyka. During their tenure they have introduced many new items to their carefully chosen collections – some made exclusively in the USA and even North Carolina.
Among the most popular is the “Joy to the World” line by famed artist Lisa Kelechava. Her creations are wildly popular, especially the Pet Set and Diva Dog Collections. With over 400 dog breeds in her gallery, the shop cannot display them all, but they can be ordered and will arrive within two days’ time. On Saturday, October 10, Lisa will be at The Christmas Tree signing her work, including the exclusive designs she has created for Trisha and Bob commemorating Highlands. This year’s piece is named Christmas Tree Farm Santa and is the sixth in the series. These exclusive pieces are popular with collectors who frequent the shop for other exquisite Polish blown glass ornaments and handmade German nutcrackers.
Christmas is not the only holiday celebrated, however. Halloween makes its presence known with animated brooms, fanciful cats, spooky witches, and plenty of ghoulish ornaments.
“We help folks create Halloween trees and they return year after year to add to their collections,” says Trisha.
But if you’re looking for a cute, sentimental gift they have those, too. You’ll find everything from collegiate-inspired to wedding and Baby’s First commemoratives. If you’re shopping for hostess gifts, you’ll want to explore their displays of candles, coasters, and soaps alongside many inexpensive items that make perfect holiday
stocking stuffers.
Begin your family’s holiday tradition at the “Joy to the World” signing on October 10 at The Christmas Tree, 357 Main Street in the former Galax Theatre. Give them a call at (828) 526-3687.

by Jenny King | Photo by Marjorie Christiansen

Empty Bowls Project

A pair of events in Cashiers and Highlands will focus on the hungry in  the twin communities, thanks to a set of lovingly crafted bowls and a helping of soup – Sunday, October 4.

A pair of events in Cashiers and Highlands will focus on the hungry in
the twin communities, thanks to a set of lovingly crafted bowls and a helping of soup – Sunday, October 4.

No one should go hungry.
Twenty-five years ago, a ceramics class in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, decided to create bowls to help raise money for the hungry in their area. Now, the Empty Bowls Movement has spread throughout the United States as well as numerous other countries.
Two local organizations, the International Friendship Center in Highlands and the Fishes and Loaves Food Pantry in Cashiers are sponsoring The Empty Bowls Project in October to support our local food banks feed the hungry in Highlands and Cashiers.
Each year, The Bascom: A Center for the Visual Arts provides the space and materials for volunteers to create the bowls, and local restaurants donate the bread and soup. Guests are invited to enjoy this simple meal and, in exchange for a cash donation, are asked to keep their bowl as a cherished keepsake and a timely reminder of the needs of the world.
The money raised is donated to end hunger and food insecurity locally. The cost is $20 per person. The Highlands event will be held on Sunday, October 4. The First Presbyterian Church of Highlands is once again hosting the event from 11:30 A.M. to 1:30 P.M. All proceeds will benefit the Food Pantry of Highlands, originally established by The International Friendship Center and the Highlands United Methodist Church and now supported by many local churches and organizations. There will be a silent auction of special bowls created and donated by professional potters.
The Empty Bowls Project in Cashiers is also Sunday, October 4, and will be held at the historic Zachary-Tolbert House from noon to 2:00 P.M. All proceeds go to the Fishes and Loaves Food Pantry in Cashiers.
For anyone who cannot attend, bowls may be purchased prior to the event by calling Carole Stork at (828) 743-3222. For Cashiers Empty Bowls, please contact Fishes and Loaves Executive Director, Larry Morris at (828) 508-0378, or Carole Stork at (828) 743-3222.
In Highlands, you may call Food Pantry of Highlands Director, Sharon Giddens at (828) 482-0558, or Faviola Olvera at the IFC, (828) 526-0890.

by Jenny King

Made By Highlands Own

This year’s incarnation of Highlands Own Craft Arts & Craft Show, set for Saturday, October 10, at the Highlands Civic Center, is  filled with one-of-a-kind treasures and a healthy  dose of community pride.

This year’s incarnation of Highlands Own Craft Arts & Craft Show, set for Saturday, October 10, at the Highlands Civic Center, is filled with one-of-a-kind treasures and a healthy dose of community pride.

The Town of Highlands presents the 33rd annual Highlands Own Craft Arts & Craft Show from 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. Saturday, October 10, at the Civic Center.
This craft show is eagerly anticipated and well-attended each year. It’s almost mind boggling to walk into the Civic Center and see so much talent under one roof.
The craft show began as the vision of the Highlands Woman’s Club, whose members realized that there were a lot of people whose hobbies produced one-of-a-kind works of art that needed to be shared. Perhaps it was the short days of winter that brought out the inner artist in many, but it was apparent that these artists needed a venue to showcase their talent. People were eager to share their art and raise a little money, either for their civic groups, or for a little cash on hand for the upcoming holiday season.
This show has grown from those humble beginnings into a show that features over 60 vendors from Highlands and surrounding areas, but it still has a certain magic to it – Highlander pride, if you will.
There is always a wide selection of arts and crafts of every imaginable kind. Here you’ll find Christmas ornaments, wood work of every kind, from hand-carved bowls to stools, chairs, and larger furniture, hand blown glass, woven items, garment bags, paintings, jewelry, candles, textiles and more.
Speaking of more, let’s not forget the enormous selection of homemade food items to choose from – breads, cakes, pies, jams, jellies, and barbecue sauces and rubs.
Admission and parking are free. As an added treat this year the Highlands Chapter #284 Order of the Eastern Star will be serving breakfast and lunch throughout the day. Plan to come out, have breakfast or lunch and take your time shopping for the many wonderful crafts. It will be a morning or afternoon well spent.

Scouting Out a Fun Evening

Mark your calendar for the Rotary Club of Highlands Bingo night on Thursday, October 1. It’ll benefit the local Cub Scouts. Highlands Cub Scout Pack 207 teaches young men honesty, integrity, citizenship, and other skills that will benefit them throughout their entire life.
Bingo fun begins at 6:30 P.M. and runs for about two hours at the Community Building at the corner of Poplar Street and US 64 – next to the ball park. Bingo costs $1 per card per game. There will be 15 games, with the last game being a grand cash prize game.
Those who wish to go the extra mile may sponsor a Table Ad. Open to business owners and individuals, you can show your support of the Scouts by making a donation and sponsoring a table. A one-page ad is only $50; half-page ads are $25. Make your checks payable to Cub Scout Pack 207. Send them to Phil Potts at P.O. Box 1959, Highlands, NC 28741 or call him at (828) 200-9753.
Enjoy free refreshments in a family atmosphere. Rotary Bingo is one of the many ways the Rotary Club of Highlands participates in supporting non-profit organizations in the Highlands area.

by Wiley Sloan

Cashiers Valley Leaf Festival

The Village Green comes to life with the Cashiers Valley Leaf Festival, October 9-11. For more information,  go to visitcashiersvalley.com

The Village Green comes to life with the Cashiers Valley Leaf Festival, October 9-11. For more information,
go to visitcashiersvalley.com.

October means leaves, pumpkins and the Cashiers Valley Leaf Festival.
This celebration of arts, crafts and music was started by the Greater Cashiers Valley Merchants Association in 2009 and will be held at the Village Green October 9-11.
There will be more than 100 artisans and merchants with live music during all three days. Admission is free, the weather is cool and the Village Green is at its finest.
Visitors will find unique handcrafted wood, pottery, jewelry and much more on display and available for purchase throughout the weekend. There will be plenty of food and drinks available in both parking lots behind the two stages of the park, which will be filled with live music throughout the weekend.
Kicking off the festivities will be a dance party Friday evening from 6:30 to 9:30 with the Continental Divide Band on the Village Commons Stage. The Continental Divide Band has been playing in the Southeast for over 30 years. They are the band everyone wants when looking for rhythm, blues, rock and dance music.
There will be three different performers on the Village Commons Stage Saturday. First up is singer songwriter, Julie Gribble at 11:00 A.M. Shawn James and The Shapeshifters will take the stage at 1:00 P.M. and The Breedlove Brothers take over at 3:00. While all this is happening, the Village Gazebo Stage will be hosting Beth Turner and David Teague.
On Sunday, October 11, from 12:30 to 3:00 P.M., Steve Johannessen performs on the Village Common Stage with his blend of smooth classics and seductive vocals.
It’s not just music that makes the Cashiers Valley Leaf Festival so popular, though. It’s the perfect mix of tunes, great food and unique shopping that attracts thousands of visitors each year. Vendors, local merchants and food tents are located throughout the festival area and the Village Green truly comes to life as the center of Cashiers.
For more information visit the Greater Cashiers Valley website at www.visitcashiersvalley.com.

by Jenny King

Oysters, Gumbo, and Jazz

A heady mixture of jazz and Cajun savories highlight Highlands on the Half-Shell, set for 12:30 P.M. Sunday, October 4 at the Highlands Nature Center’s Amphitheater. Proceeds from this party will support the Highlands Biological Foundation.

A heady mixture of jazz and Cajun savories highlight Highlands on the Half-Shell, set for 12:30 P.M. Sunday, October 4 at the Highlands Nature Center’s Amphitheater. Proceeds from this party will support the Highlands Biological Foundation.

On Sunday, October 4, a group of Highlands residents are hosting Highlands on the Half-Shell in the amphitheater behind the Nature Center to support the Highlands Biological Foundation.
Feast on oysters and gumbo while enjoying the energetic tunes of Asheville’s Firecracker Jazz Band. The fun starts at 12:30 P.M. and will last until 3:30. Come dressed in your favorite “Cajun casual.”
Tickets are $100 for members and $125 for non-members. To purchase tickets, visit highlandsbiological.org/half-shell/. This event is hosted by Nancy and Lyle Nichols, Martha and Hal Stibbs, Jennie and Sto Stowers, Cookie and Harrison Jones, Julia and Bill Grumbles, Amanda and Greg Gregory, Vevie and Lawrence Dimmitt, Paul Sanger, Diane and Ray McPhail, Miriam and Vernon Skiles, Glenda and Griffin Bell, and Ruth and Barry Edwards.
The Highlands Biological Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that provides critical support for the Biological Station and it’s three facets – the Nature Center, Botanical Garden, and Biological Laboratory. Thanks to the generosity of members and community residents, admission to the Nature Center and Botanical Garden are free.
Join us to support the mission of the Highlands Biological Station – “To foster research and education focused on the rich natural heritage of the southern Appalachian mountains.” Knowing that your support is directly contributing to conservation efforts, research, and education to better understand the exceptional organisms in the southern Appalachian Mountains, you’ll find that oysters and gumbo have never tasted – and jazz never sounded – so good.

by Wiley Sloan

Fall Fest: Be About It!

The Highlands School PTO Fall Festival, set for Saturday, October 3, at the Civic Center, offers a full season’s worth of fun, thrills and treats.

The Highlands School PTO Fall Festival, set for Saturday, October 3, at the Civic Center, offers a full season’s worth of fun, thrills and treats.

Join us for some Old-Fashioned Fun!
You’ll get a double dose of it at the Highlands School PTO Fall Festival on Saturday, October 3, from 5:00 to 9:00 P.M. This year the festival, the major fundraiser for the school’s PTO, will be held at the Highlands Civic Center (Rec Park).
Always popular, the Cake Walk features delights made by board members and staff parents, while other traditional festival favorites such as funnel cakes, popcorn, caramel apples, and cotton candy, will be available as well.
There will be plenty of activities so you can burn off those treats, and this year you’ll even find a 20-foot obstacle course. Get your game on at the Velcro wall, bounce house, soccer, basketball, and football booths.
Beware! The senior class is planning a thrilling haunted room. Are you brave enough?
Let students turn you into a unicorn or The Hulk with their artistic use of face paint and hair spray.
A long-standing tradition of the Highlands School PTO Fall Festival are the theme boxes. Each class puts together a box filled with food and prizes that follow a theme. These boxes are then available at the Great Silent Theme Box Auction. You’ll find more items available from local businesses at the Fall Festival Raffle, such as $100 gift cards. Tickets for the raffle are $1 each, or 6 for $5.
The senior class and parents donate their time and energy giving back to their school by running the game booths. In return, the PTO provides caps and gowns for graduation. All teachers and staff at the school volunteer for at least two hours to receive money for their individual classrooms. It takes a community effort to make the festival a success. This success goes directly back into the classrooms and again reaches every child at Highlands School. Be part of their success and bring your whole family for a night of affordable fun! See you Saturday, October 3, from 5:00 to 9:00 P.M. at the Highlands Civic Center (The Rec Park).

by Jenny King

Dreaming in Chocolate

Oh, what a way to go – patrons of the Highlands Own Arts & Craft Show, October 10 at the Civic Center, risk chocolate overload when the ladies of the Scaly Mountain Women’s Club unveil their  Chocolate Fantasy Fest.

Oh, what a way to go – patrons of the Highlands Own Arts & Craft Show, October 10 at the Civic Center, risk chocolate overload when the ladies of the Scaly Mountain Women’s Club unveil their Chocolate Fantasy Fest.

Who can resist chocolate?
OK, I know, a few of you say you can, but even then I beg to ask the question. I’m a dark chocolate girl exclusively, but when faced with the array of chocolaty treats with a mélange of amazing ingredients, baked by the members of the Scaly Mountain Women’s Club, well, I can’t resist any of it, and neither will you.
Now that I have your attention, you’re probably asking where you can be tempted by all things chocolate, too – Chocolate Fantasy Fest!
Once again the Scaly Mountain Women’s Club will have a booth at the 33rd annual Highlands Own Arts & Craft Show at the Highlands Civic Center from 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M., Saturday, October 10.
Everything is homemade by the women of the SMWC – they know how to make delectable, irresistible treats. Chocolate Fantasy Fest, our final grand slam of the season, offers an assortment of specialty cakes, sumptuous cookies, decadent bars, even chocolate mice, and so much more. There are also items made for special dietary needs such as nut- and gluten-free.
In addition to Chocolate Fantasy Fest this month, there will be one more Pancake Breakfast for the season. Join us October 24 from 7:30 to 10:30 A.M. at the Historic Scaly School House on the corner of Highway 106 and Buck Knob Road in Scaly Mountain. We serve up fresh local blueberry pancakes (you can get them plain, but why?), local sausage from Blalock Meat, orange juice, and piping hot coffee.
Proceeds from these events go towards scholarships for local students, giving them a chance to fulfill their educational dreams. The SMWC is grateful for all the support it receives from local businesses, residents, and visitors who continuously contribute to our cause.
SMWC is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the charitable and educational needs of the Scaly Mountain community. For more information about our working club, to join, or to make a contribution, please visit us at scalymountainwomensclub.org.

Contributed by Sophia Iler

In the Punkin’ Patch

Highlands United Methodist Church delivers a bounty of autumn harvests with its Pumpkin Festival, 11:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. Saturday, October 3.  There’ll be contests, activities for kids, lots of food and a complete pumpkin patch, right on Main Street.

Highlands United Methodist Church delivers a bounty of autumn harvests with its Pumpkin Festival, 11:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. Saturday, October 3. There’ll be contests, activities for kids, lots of food and a complete pumpkin patch, right on Main Street.

Highlands United Methodist Church’s Main Street lawn will be transformed into a classic fall pumpkin patch as it stages its Pumpkin Festival, 11:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. Saturday, October 3.
There’ll be a pumpkin decorating contest, face painting, and a pumpkin carving contest.
And, of course, pumpkins for sale – lots and lots of pumpkins in all sorts of shapes and sizes. “Picking up a punkin’” from the HUMC patch has become something of a Highlands tradition. Prices start as low as $1 for a diminutive Pumpkin Patch Baby. All pumpkin purchasers will receive a buy-one-get-one coupon from Kilwins.
You can also pre-order your pumpkins and buy “in bulk.” Just call the Church Office at (828) 526-3376 or e-mail humcjennifer@gmail.com.
Naturally, all of that activity on a brisk October Saturday is bound to sharpen your appetite. The church will be serving up hot dog lunches, complete with Boy Scout Fries, and a drink, for $5. Since it’s an HUMC celebration, there’ll also be a vast selection of homemade baked goods available for purchase.
Proceeds from the festival will support the church’s Youth Programs, including trips to serve the homeless, mission work in Haiti, and local service projects.
If you would like to support the youth in their many mission projects, donations may be mailed to HUMC, PO Box 1959, Highlands, NC 28741.

by Wiley Sloan

Frightfully Fun Time

Cashiers’ Goblins In the Green celebration is all treat and no trick. Everyone is invited to gather at  The Village Green Commons at 6:00 P.M.  Friday, October 23, for a joyful, slightly spooky, party.

Cashiers’ Goblins In the Green celebration is all treat and no trick. Everyone is invited to gather at
The Village Green Commons at 6:00 P.M. Friday, October 23, for a joyful, slightly spooky, party.

Looking for a frightfully fun time for the entire family to celebrate Halloween?
Come be a part of Goblins In the Green. Dress up in your favorite silly or scary costume for the third annual Cashiers tradition, 6:00 to 8:00 P.M. Friday, October 23, at The Village Green Commons on Frank Allen Road. This year’s event features loads of activities for kids and fun for the entire family. Count on spooky surprises and special treats!
One of the highlights of the evening will be a costume contest at 7:30 P.M. Prizes will be awarded to the best boy and girl costume as well as the best owner and pet coordinating costume. Local businesses and organizations in Cashiers are helping The Village Green and the Jackson County Parks and Recreation Department to provide a ghoulishly good time for the community.
“Bring your trick or treat bag and a camera,” says Ann Self, Executive Director of The Village Green.
The Village Green is a 12.5 acre park extending from the crossroads of Highway 64 and Highway 107 to Frank Allen Road in Cashiers. The Village Green hosts thousands of visitors and more than 100 events each year. What many people don’t realize is that this park is unique because it’s privately conserved and operated by a nonprofit organization. The Village Green receives no government support. Every contribution is valuable toward not only maintaining the park but making events like Goblins In the Green possible for residents and guests in the area to experience.
For more information, visit villagegreencashiersnc.com. You can also “Like” TheVillage Green on Facebook, or follow on Twitter @cashiersgreen.

Contributed by Ann Self

Highlands’ Fright Night

There’s nothing (really) scary about Highlands’ Downtown Trick or Treat 6:00 P.M. Saturday, October 31.  Now with 30 percent fewer zombie “incidents.”

There’s nothing (really) scary about Highlands’ Downtown Trick or Treat 6:00 P.M. Saturday, October 31.
Now with 30 percent fewer zombie “incidents.”


October is a favorite time here in Highlands. The leaves are vibrant, the apples are crisp, and the sky is an even more vibrant shade of that famed Carolina blue.
When the month is said and done we go all out and send it out in style with Downtown Trick or Treat, our safe, fun-filled, family friendly celebration of Halloween. This annual event, sponsored by the Highlands Chamber of Commerce, will be held on Saturday, October 31, at 6:00 P.M. and offers fun for everyone, from the smallest busy bee being pushed in a stroller to the scariest monster.
This strolling parade of the scary and not-so-scary brings out kids of all ages and more than a few pets in their scariest, cutest, or most creative costumes to collect a treasure trove of goodies. Expect to see zombies, skeletons, witches, pirates, brides, ghosts, princesses, Minions, super heroes, and more than one clever take on the pop culture icons of the day.
Local businesses distribute candy to revelers and you’ll find that many embrace the spirit of the evening with decorated storefronts and more than a few clever costumes. This evening is truly fun for everyone, young and old. Even those without children will enjoy strolling and people-watching.
As in years past there will be classic Halloween-themed music at Town Square, hot dogs served by the Highlands Mountaintop Rotary Club, and hot chocolate and cider for all. There is no charge for your hot dog dinner, but donations are appreciated.
What’s for dessert? Candy, of course! It all adds up to an unforgettable evening of family fun filled with sweet treats, clever costumes, and memories to be made and shared. Don’t miss this annual event!
Please remember that in order to keep the streets safe for all the trick or treaters, Main Street will close at 5:30 P.M. that day.

by Mary Jane McCall | Cover Painting by Janet Cummings

Annual Fall Clean-Up

Take a break – leave that leaf litter! There’s gold in that humble pile of composting material.

Take a break – leave that leaf litter! There’s gold in that humble pile of composting material.


As we all know, October is the time of year for beautiful leaves, warm sweaters, and yard work.
What you may not realize is that some of that “yard mess” is very beneficial for many of the other organisms that also share your yard. For example, black-eyed susans, purple coneflowers, coreopsis, cosmos, zinnias, sunflowers, and native grasses are excellent plants to leave in your garden after the blooms fade. The seed heads of these plants and many other native species are a wonderful food source for songbirds. No need to get out your pruning shears!
Similarly, you may want to reconsider the chore of raking up leaves or getting out the leaf blower to keep the yard looking clean. Leaving your fallen leaves in situ or spreading them in your existing flowerbeds could be a good alternative. Leaf litter is a source of shelter for many organisms throughout the winter. Our native bumblebee queens and beloved salamanders rely on leaf debris to survive the cold winters. This leaf litter and coarse woody debris (fallen branches) provides warmth, insulation, and food for the salamanders. Leaf litter is also a great ingredient for many compost piles.
When composted, leaf litter makes excellent garden soil for the next growing season because of its high nitrogen content and its ability to increase soil water retention by up to fifty percent without using any toxic chemicals or inorganic soil additives. This also makes any yard more salamander friendly. The Appalachians are home to 11 percent (76) of the world’s 671 salamander species, making it an extraordinary salamander biodiversity hotspot. What’s more, nearly half of these species are found nowhere else on earth. Many of our salamanders breathe through their skin, making them very sensitive to chemicals in the environment.
So instead of working day after day to rake up or blow away all of those leaves and fallen twigs, or cut back all of your perennials that have gone to seed, why not “leaf” them this year, and spend your free time learning more about this beautiful environment at the Highlands Biological Station, which fosters research and education focused on the southern Appalachian environment. At the Station, we believe that the best way to learn is to experience, so stop by the Nature Center to learn more about our local salamanders or take a walk in the Botanical Garden to see our native plants in their autumn splendor. For more information, visit highlandsbiological.org.

Contributed by Sonya Carpenter | Photo by Jason Butler

No-Fem Pageant

For more than 18 years Dr. John Baumrucker, his wife Joanna, and their many friends have been supporting the folks in Montero, Bolivia.
In addition to improving the medical care of the area, the mission has also built and supported a foster home for young boys from ages four to 18. They have taught homebuilding and reached out to prisoners who need to hear the word of God. They’ve recruited their friends and fellow medical professionals to help in this heart-filled ministry, too.
Throughout the years a key supporter has been Highlands United Methodist Church, but they have been joined by people throughout the Highlands community. Several years ago a team of people from the First Presbyterian Church of Highlands began building water systems in Bolivia.
Mission work is expensive, so Dr. John has had to be very creative in finding funding sources for all of their mission work. Much to the consternation of many of his male friends, one of Dr. J’s ideas to raise funds was the Missed Highlands All-Male Beauty Pageant.
Since its inaugural event in 2005, many guys in Highlands have shelved their pride “for the good of the mission.” Patterned loosely like other pageants, there is a talent section and an evening gown competition. Some of these gentlemen are very creative. There are some real beauties on that stage. Of course, there is much laughter too, as the guys try to overcome their uncomfortableness while walking in heels. From the beauties in the evening gown competition, to the talent competition and then the “at home attire,” you never know what will happen on stage.
The beauties will fill the stage of the Highlands Playhouse on Oak Street on Monday night, October 12. The performance begins at 8:00 P.M. Come enjoy a glass of wine before the show begins. The Wine bar sponsored by Bryson’s Food Store opens at 7:00 P.M. Tickets are $100 each (fully tax deductible). Call (828) 526-3605 for ticket information or send your check for tickets to the address below.
If you can’t attend the Pageant but want to support the Bolivian Mission, please mail your contributions to Highlands Bolivian Mission, 209 Hospital Drive, Suite 304, Highlands, NC 28741.
The mission is also collecting band instruments. If you have band instruments that you will donate, please call Les Scott at Highlands United Methodist Church at (828) 526-3376.

by Wiley Sloan

Specialty Fire Areas

The outdoors becomes an even more attractive party setting with the clear days and crisp nights of October.

The outdoors becomes an even more attractive party setting with the clear days and crisp nights of October.


Fall is upon us! Welcome the colors of autumn with outdoor events at your home.
Never has there been a better time to create an outdoor setting for communal warmth. Be it fireplace, fire pit or ring, study with the masters.
Learn how to design an outdoor kitchen and enjoy with a field trip to study several high into the mountains and into sheltered woodlands. Learn the secrets to designing and implementing specialty fire areas for success the first time!
Al fresco dinner parties gathered around the outdoor fireplace. Children toasting marshmallows over a small fire pit. Grilling pavilions for larger parties or smaller pizza oven gatherings provide group activities while creating your own signature piece right in front of the oven.
Do these sound enticing enough to encourage outside events as the weather changes?
Join us at 10:00 A.M. Friday, October 23, for this two- hour workshop. The fee is $100. Please contact Mary Palmer Dargan (828) 743-0307 to register. Dovecote is located on Highway 107 S, right next to Cornucopia Restaurant at 35 Flash Point Drive in Cashiers. The event is sponsored by Dargan Landscape Architects.

Fall Into Step with CLE

Fall is one of the best times of the year to be in Highlands and Cashiers, and October is a great month to be involved in the Center for Life Enrichment.
If you’re looking to understand the brilliant show of red, yellow, and orange hues that nature puts on every autumn, join “Fall Foliage Forecaster” Howard Neufeld as he explains how and why the diversity of the Southern Appalachian forests creates this splendor of color. Neufeld, a plant physiology professor at Appalachian State University, will take participants on a short walk to admire a number of trees and shrubs. Participants will compare and contrast the foliage colors and understand why they vary. After attending “Appreciating Fall Foliage Color: Where Science Meets Art Meets Economics,” you’ll be able to impress friends and family with your leaf knowledge as they “ooh” and “aah” over the fall colors!
To further enjoy this beautiful time of year in the mountains, take a day trip to John C. Campbell Folk School, an amazing facility dedicated to preserving the rich heritage of the Appalachian region through concerts, dances, presentations, and classes. After admiring the work of local artists, participants will get to shop for handmade treasures in the Folk School Gift Shop and enjoy lunch at The Copper Door in Hayesville, North Carolina.
Basic and Advanced iPad classes are available with Nigel, as well as his new class that covers the new features in both OS X El Capitan and iOS for iPhones and iPads that will make all Apple devices easier and more productive to use. Learn about the new Split Screen system that allows you to use two apps at the same time on the same screen!
We have an exciting 2016 season planned, so please take time to renew your membership. For membership or class information, please call (828) 526-8811, visit clehighlands.com, or stop by our office located in the lower level of the Peggy Crosby Center at 348 South Fifth Street in Highlands.

Contributed by Bonnie Dayton

Cool Air, Hot Music

Crisp October evenings are even more magical with Highlands’ Friday Night Live  concerts, 6:00 P.M. Fridays at Town Square.

Crisp October evenings are even more magical with Highlands’ Friday Night Live
concerts, 6:00 P.M. Fridays at Town Square.


Live music continues through October at The Friday Night Live concert series, held every Friday night during the summer and fall seasons. Shows are at Town Square and start at 6:00 P.M. These free events have been well-attended this season by residents and visitors alike, who enjoy the wide array of music. Bands vary from week to week, but many make more than one appearance so they’ve become local favorites.
This month, enjoy the sounds of returning favorites Southern Highlands on October 2. The Johnny Webb Band returns on October 9. Front man Johnny Webb was born and raised in Highlands, so he enjoys a large audience here. They play country favorites and feature the sounds of a steel guitar.
Mountain Dulcimer Club takes the stage on October 16. Their performances of traditional and contemporary music written and arranged for the Appalachian Mountain dulcimer are always a
crowd favorite.
The acoustic Macon Grass Band winds up the season on October 23, playing a bit of everything from bluegrass and folk to country and country rock. There will not be a show on Friday, October 30, as the town prepares for its annual downtown Halloween celebration to be held on October 31.
October is an especially fun time to enjoy these shows. The cool, fall air has a bit of a nip to it and darkness falls a bit earlier, so you can wrap up in a warm sweater and enjoy music as dusk surrounds you. It’s also a great time to enjoy the shops and restaurants of downtown Highlands, which stay open later on Friday nights. Downtown Highlands is a magical place on these fall evenings.
For more information about Friday Nights Live, please contact the Highlands Chamber of Commerce, who proudly sponsor these concerts for the enjoyment of all. Their phone number is (828) 526-2112.

by Mary Jane McCall

Dahlias take center stage at High Hampton’s Dinner in the Dahlia Garden, September 14. 
For information or tickets, call (800) 334-2551 or visit HighHamptonInn.com.

Dinner in Dahlias

dinner_in_dahlias_high_hampton_inn_cashiers_nc_three

dinner_in_dahlias_high_hampton_inn_cashiers_nc_two

Dahlias take center stage at High Hampton’s Dinner in the Dahlia Garden, September 14.  For information or tickets, call (800) 334-2551 or visit HighHamptonInn.com.

Dahlias take center stage at High Hampton’s Dinner in the Dahlia Garden, September 14.
For information or tickets, call (800) 334-2551 or visit HighHamptonInn.com.

The historic High Hampton Inn in Cashiers has been welcoming families with tradition and hospitality since 1922. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the inn’s long-standing customs such as Afternoon Tea, dressing for dinner and the art of conversation are held in as high regard as the scenery, golf, recreation and children’s programs. In classic shingle style, poplar and chestnut exteriors reflect the mountain setting, as do the rustic and elegant inn rooms.
The property sits on over 1,400 acres that includes a 35-acre lake, a golf course and a nearly two-acre Dahlia Garden. Granted, our area is known for its amazing dahlias, but the garden at High Hampton Inn is truly special. The dahlias were first planted over 100 years ago by Caroline Halsted, a niece of General Wade Hampton. She was the wife of Dr. William Halsted, internationally-acclaimed first Chief of Surgery at Johns Hopkins and the second owners of High Hampton. The flowers bloom in late summer and early fall and then the bulbs are dug up for the winter and replanted again the following season.
Twice yearly, the inn hosts Dinner in the Dahlia Garden. One was held last month and the next will be held September 14. Event organizer Caroline Grogan says she’s always astonished at how the blossoms vary from year to year. She eagerly anticipates both the pure and variegated shades, planning the dinners’ décor accordingly. One long table, seating 30 people, is artistically arranged with specially chosen place settings, table linens, and of course,
floral arrangements.
The dinner is an opportunity to view the stunning flowers while learning about their history and enjoying the multi-course twilight meal prepared by chefs at the High Hampton Inn.
Tickets for the September 14 Dinner in the Dahlia Garden are $75 per person and may be purchased by calling the inn at (800) 334-2551 or online at HighHamptonInn.com. High Hampton Inn is located in Cashiers at 1525 Highway 107 South.

Scaly Mountain Community Fun Day

It’s a full day of fun when Scaly Mountain, the Little Community That Could, sets out to have a good time.
Everyone is invited to celebrate, September 26.

The Scaly Mountain Community Association has dedicated September 26 as Fun Day. A variety of fun activities have been planned for residents, neighbors and visitors starting at 9:00 A.M.
The location is the Sky Valley-Scaly Mountain Volunteer Fire & Rescue fire house on Hale Ridge Road.
A community yard sale opens at 9:00 A.M. People can rent a table for $10 and sell their no-longer-needed possessions and make money. It’s recommended that you reserve a table now by calling Grace Crouch at (828) 526-8528. There’ll be lots of tools, tools and tools at bargain prices. Yes there will be housewares, clothing and toys – something for everyone.
A regional Chili Cook-Off will highlight the talents of local chefs. You can enter your favorite chili recipe to see if your chili is “Good,” “Better,” or “Best Chili” in the region. To enter, please call (828) 526-8528 and reserve a place in the competition.
The SV-SMVFR fire house will hold an Open House from noon to 2:00 P.M. Bring the kids or grandkids out to see the fire trucks and meet local volunteer firefighters. You can also tour the Fitness Center, which is open to residents Monday through Friday, 9:00 to 11:00 A.M., at no cost.
Family fun includes firetruck rides, mule wagon rides, and face painting.
There will be music, food and beverages, too.
You’re invited to make a personal or family input to the SMCA Time Capsule. Sign a register, write a personal message, or make a prediction that will be included in a Time Capsule, which will be sealed, buried and re-opened in 2025. Photographs are ok, but no valuables included, please.

Contributed by Charlie Fitt

Paoletti’s Ristorante will host a cocktail party and dinner on 
Wednesday, September 30, to benefit the effort to establish a 
hospice facility for this corner of Western North Carolina. 
For tickets, call (828) 526-4906.

Paoletti’s: Partner in Hope

Paoletti’s Ristorante will host a cocktail party and dinner on Wednesday, September 30, to benefit the effort to establish a hospice facility for this corner of Western North Carolina. For tickets, call (828) 526-4906.

On Wednesday, September30, Paoletti’s Ristorante of Highlands will host A Peaceful Journey, a charitable dining event in support of the Hospice House Foundation of Western North Carolina.
You’re invited to join them for an evening honoring the compassion, dignity, and comfort that defines hospice care. There will be two options that evening. From 5:00 to 7:00 P.M. will be a cocktail party for $150 per person, followed by a separate ticketed dinner at 7:30 P.M. for $250 per person.
Paoletti’s Ristorante of Highlands was established in 1995, after 35 years in Florida. This polished European-style venue offers refined Italian dishes and wine, with separate bar seating. It has consistently been one of the top dining destinations in Highlands since its inception.
Proceeds from this dining event will benefit Hospice House Foundation of WNC, a (501) C 3 organization whose mission is to raise funds for a hospice inpatient facility for the Western North Carolina region. A hospice house is a residence created to care for terminally ill patients with medical conditions which cannot be managed in home. It offers a home-like setting where residents spend their final days.
Currently, there is no such hospice house in the area, with the closest dedicated facility located in Flat Rock, North Carolina. To support this most worthy cause, patrons are encouraged to attend either the Cocktails and Casual Grazing or the Dining for Dignity or both.
Seating is extremely limited so early reservations are suggested. Music will accompany both events and guests will be able to bid for a variety of distinguished wines at the Silent Auction.
The cocktail reception is a come-as-you-are social with hors d’oeuvres and select wines. Then for dinner, you may choose from a decadent 4-course meal with wine pairings created just for the evening.
Ticket prices for both include tax and gratuity. Meg and Arthur Paoletti encourage you visit Ristorante Paoletti September 30 for A Peaceful Journey, to support the Hospice House Foundation of Western North Carolina. For tickets contact Meg or Arthur at (828) 526-4906.

by Jenny King

A gala to benefit the fight against AIDS will be staged at the 
Asheville Event Centre, Saturday, September 26. 
For information, call (828) 252-7489.

Raise Your Hand Auction

A gala to benefit the fight against AIDS will be staged at the Asheville Event Centre, Saturday, September 26. For information, call (828) 252-7489.

The Western North Carolina AIDS Project is planning its annual Raise Your Hand Auction and Gala on Saturday, September 26, at the Asheville Event Centre on Sweeten Creek Road. WNCAP provides services throughout Western North Carolina so they are calling all western counties to join in this night of festivities to raise funds for their important work.
“We are addressing a new wave of the HIV epidemic today, one that impacts young people and minorities in greater numbers” says WNCAP’s Executive Director Jeff Bachar. “WNCAP is on the forefront our area’s fight to put an end to new infections. We also provide invaluable resources and support to those living with the disease through our team of case managers. The funds raised through the Raise Your Hand Auction and Gala will allow us to continue this impactful work and expand our outreach.
The evening promises a lively auction with an impressive lineup of treasures to bid on, including one-of-a-kind art pieces created just for this event, antiques, vacation packages, local art, and fine wines. Auction items are available for viewing at wncapgala.org.
Strada Italiano will cater the event and Chef Anthony Cerrato is planning an impressive menu paired with fine wines. Start your meal with the famous Tuscan Stuffed Figs, followed by outstanding dinner entrée choices from the sea or a beef or vegetarian option.
Emmy-nominated Kat Williams is this year’s Honorary Chair.
“Kat is a longtime supporter of WNCAP and an advocate for those living with HIV/AIDS, andat is best known for her beautiful voice and inspiring music – she uses that voice not only to entertain, but to help us build a better community,” states Pam Siekman, WNCAP’s Chairperson for the Raise Your Hand Fundraiser.
Tickets for this exciting event are $125 per person and are available at wncapgala.org or by calling (828) 252-7489.

Lyons’ Darn Good Yarns

Lee Lyons shares her gift for telling tales of all shapes at the Albert Carlton-Cashiers Community Library, 6:00 P.M. Thursday, September 24.

Albert Carlton-Cashiers Community Library will present an evening of storytelling with raconteur Lee Lyons at 6:00 P.M. Thursday, September 24.
The program, suitable for audiences of all ages, will offer the warm, gentle humor of Ms. Lyons, a fixture of the local stage. She’ll talk about the people and events that have shaped her life and the stories she’s picked up along the way.
“This program is part of a statewide initiative sponsored by the North Carolina Storytelling Guild,” says
Librarian Serenity Richards. “They’re offering storytellers in 100 libraries across the state – and we’re lucky enough to have Lee. She’s one of those exuberant personalities that everyone should have in their life.”
Ms. Lyons’ presentation is offered free of charge in the library’s Meeting Room.
Albert Carlton-Cashiers Community Library is located at 249 Frank Allen Road. For information about Ms. Lyons’ presentation or the other activities offered by the library, call (828) 743-0215.

by Luke Osteen

Oh, the treasures to be discovered when Acorn’s Boutique hosts a month’s worth of trunk shows. For more information, call (828) 787-2640.

A Trunkful of Fabulous

Oh, the treasures to be discovered when Acorn’s Boutique hosts a month’s worth of trunk shows. For more information, call (828) 787-2640.

It’s another winning month at Acorn’s Boutique in Highlands, with designer trunk shows scheduled from September 4 through the 27.
With cooler weather approaching, it’s time to update your collection of hats, and it’s not often you have the opportunity to meet a true artisan-hatmaker like Tess McGuire. Growing up in Switzerland, McGuire fell in love with knitting from an early age. Later she discovered felting and began turning her loosely knitted creations into warm, solid, virtually waterproof garments. Each hat is handmade and a true work of art. Visit the Tess McGuire trunk show September 4-6.
Coralia Leets Jewelry will be featured September 5-7. Born in Nicaragua, Leets moved to the United States in 1987. She launched her business in 2001 and has now become known as one of the top jewelry
designers worldwide.
From jewelry we move onto clothing when Fat Hat Clothing holds their trunk show September 11-12. Joan Ecker, designer and dreamer of Fat Hat Clothing, says she had a Eureka! Moment when she decided to start making clothing “that loves me just the way I am.”
She adds, “We always make sure we sew one strong thread of good humor into each new item we make.”
Mix your new Fat Hat Clothing with Freida Rothman Jewelry, whose trunk show is September 11-16. Rothman was practically raised in the New YorkYC jewelry industry and her designs are the perfect mix of casual elegance and big city glamor, using sterling silver, 14k gold, platinum and black rhodium.
Finishing out the trunk show month of September will be Kathleen Weir-West Clothing, September 25-27. Kathleen Weir-West has been creating hand woven luxury fabrics that she fashions into fine art wearables for over 30 years. Her highly acclaimed work has been exhibited across the country at many notable galleries.
Make time in your busy schedule to stop by these extraordinary trunk shows. For a full schedule, visit Acorns Boutique at OldEdwardsInn.com/DesignerTrunkShows or call them at (828) 787-2640.

by Jenny King

The wonders of local apples and their storied heritage are celebrated with a free presentation by historian Dana Holden, September 29, 
at The Village Green in Cashiers. For more information, visit villagegreencashiersnc.com or call (828) 743-3434.

Sheepnoses & Limbertwigs

The wonders of local apples and their storied heritage are celebrated with a free presentation by historian Dana Holden, September 29, at The Village Green in Cashiers. For more information, visit villagegreencashiersnc.com or call (828) 743-3434.

In the produce department of most grocery stores today, you can choose from about a dozen kinds of apples.
But at one time, more than 1,500 varieties of apples grew in the South. Heritage apples are the apples of our grandparents and great-grandparents.
Their uses were as diverse as their unique names – Ginger Gold, Crow’s Egg, and Carolina Beauty, to name a few. Apple historian Dana Holden will present a program on these heirloom apples entitled “Sheepnoses and Limbertwigs” at this month’s Village Nature Series, 5:30 P.M. Tuesday, September 29, at The Village Green Commons on Frank Allen Road in Cashiers.
Holden has been studying and preserving heritage apples when she discovered trees next to her home on the border of the Blue Ridge Parkway.
“I’m sure they were planted before the Parkway was built, sometime around 1930 or earlier,” she says.
When she learned that others were interested in locating varieties that were supposed to be extinct, she taught herself to propagate apple trees. Holden says that her personal favorite is the North Carolina Keeper that she fills a barrel with every year and enjoys well into March. These old-timey apples are part of our area’s agricultural heritage, but they are in danger of being lost forever. The trees are being cut down and the generation that knows their names is passing away.
Holden says, “The message that I want to share is that if you have an old tree in your yard, it could be one of a kind!”
This is the final Village Nature Series for 2015. These monthly programs featuring natural and cultural elements of this area are sponsored by The Village Green and the Highlands-Cashiers Land Trust. For more information about Village Nature Series, visit The Village Green website at villagegreencashiersnc.com or call (828) 743-3434.

Contributed by Ann Self

Coming ‘Round Again

The Cashiers Songwriters’ Round, a unique gathering of Nashville’s core musical talent, will be held Saturday, September 19, at Trillium Links and Lake Club. For tickets or more information, visit the Cashiers Area Chamber of Commerce or call (828) 743-5191.

It takes a village.
The members of the Blue Ridge School Education Foundation Inc. truly believe this. Over the years, they have donated many thousands of dollars to make Blue Ridge School and Blue Ridge Early College world-class facilities.
The school will be celebrating its 40th anniversary this coming school year and the foundation plans to be part of its continuing future. They do this by working closely with the Jackson County Board of Education and staff of Blue Ridge to provide scholarships, books, resources, and more.
Where does this money come from?
One of the biggest sources is the Cashiers Songwriters’ Round, now in its 10th year. This year the Songwriter’s Round will be held at Trillium Links & Lake Club on Saturday, September 19. The ticket price of $100 includes dinner and a full evening of music. Sponsorships are available at the Gold ($1500), Silver ($600) and Bronze ($300) levels. Gold Sponsors will have a reserved stage side table for 10.
Close family ties to Cashiers led Nashville songwriter Rivers Rutherford to donate his time and talents to raise money for the foundation 10 years ago. Every year he brings equally famous songwriting friends to the stage where they provide an evening of rip-roaring, no-holds-barred entertainment. Known for his gritty, southern style, Rutherford has become a staple on Universal Music Publishing’s roster since 1996 and continues to write with and for the biggest names in country music. As a respected artist in his own right, he has friends in high places.
At last year’s Songwriter’s Round, Rutherford brought along fellow writers George Teren, Tim James, Kelley Lovelace, and HLN broadcaster and songwriter Robin Michelle Meade. According to foundation’s president Carl Hyde, the artists look at their time spent here as quality vacation time, so it’s a win-win. Cashiers gets to share its beauty with these stars and they share their music with Cashiers.
Tickets for the 10th annual Cashiers Songwriters’ Round on September 19 may be purchased through the Cashiers Area Chamber of Commerce, (828) 743-5191.

by Jenny King

Cashiers_nc_arts_crafts_festival

Fall for Art, Sept. 5th

The busy summer season comes to a joyful end with the vast Cashiers Rotary Fall Arts & Crafts Show, September 5 and 6 at the Village Green. For more information, visit cashiersrotary.org.

Summer may be coming to an end, but that doesn’t mean the magic of the season is gone.
Amble over to the Village Green in Cashiers this Labor Day weekend to experience some of the finest artisans from throughout the Southeast. The Cashiers Rotary Fall Arts & Crafts Show is one of the area’s most notable events, marking the end of the season with a display of talent and level of craft unmatched anywhere else on the Highlands-Cashiers Plateau.
This year’s Fall Arts & Crafts Show takes place on Saturday, September 5, and Sunday, September 6, from 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. both days, rain or shine. On display are some returning favorites from past shows, as well as some new faces making their debut this year. From unique ironwork and woodcraft to hand-thrown pottery, hand-stitched textiles, and homemade cakes, pies, jellies, and jams, there’s something to please every artistic palate and tempt even the most finicky tastes.
Entrance to the Cashiers Rotary Fall Arts & Crafts Show is free, but all donations are accepted and greatly appreciated. All funds raised during the shows go to benefit the Cashiers Rotary Club Charities Fund, which supports area charities that perform good works and advocate on the behalf of the under-served and underprivileged within the community. The club has distributed more than $1 million to date and, with your help, hopes to expand the reach even further.
Members of the Cashiers Rotary will also show off their culinary skills at the Refreshment Booth, offering hot dogs, hamburgers, veggie burgers, and more to keep you fueled up as you hunt for the perfect piece to add to your collection.
Join us and the more than 70 exhibiting artisans as we bid farewell to summer in style, with fine art, custom crafts, good food, and family fun at the Cashiers Rotary Arts & Crafts Show on September 5 and 6 at the Village Green. Visit cashiersrotary.org for more information on events, participating artisans, or last-minute artisan registrations.

Highlands and Cashiers will be staging a pair of Empty Bowl projects on Sunday, October 4, 
to help feed the local needy.

Fill a Bowl, Fill a Belly

Highlands and Cashiers will be staging a pair of Empty Bowl projects on Sunday, October 4,
to help feed the local needy.

At least 16 percent of the residents of Jackson and Macon Counties suffer from food insecurity. Many more are self-sufficient so long as no emergency arises. However, injury, sickness, or the loss of a job can suddenly throw an individual or a family into a crisis situation. No one should be forced to live without food.
The Empty Bowls Project is an international movement to help feed the hungry right here in our own communities. Two local organizations, the International Friendship Center in Highlands and the Fishes and Loaves Food Pantry in Cashiers, are sponsoring The Empty Bowls Project in October to support our local food banks.
Each year, the Bascom: A Center for the Visual Arts provides the space and materials for volunteers to create the bowls and local restaurants donate the bread and soup. Guests are invited to enjoy this simple meal and, in exchange for a cash donation, are asked to keep their bowl as a cherished keepsake and a timely reminder of the needs of the world. The money raised is donated to end hunger and food insecurity locally. The cost is $20.
The Highlands event will be held on Sunday, October 4. The First Presbyterian Church of Highlands is once again hosting the event from 11:30 A.M. to 1:30 P.M. All proceeds will benefit the Food Pantry of Highlands, originally established by The International Friendship Center and the Highlands United Methodist Church and now supported by many local churches and organizations. There will be a silent auction of special bowls created and donated by professional potters.
The Empty Bowls Project in Cashiers is also Sunday, October 4, and will be held at the historic Zachary-Tolbert House from noon to 2:00 P.M. All proceeds go to the Fishes and Loaves Food Pantry in Cashiers. For anyone who cannot attend, bowls may be purchased prior to the event by calling Carole Stork at (828) 743-3222. For Cashiers Empty Bowls, please contact Fishes and Loaves Executive Director Larry Morris at (828) 508-0378 or Carole Stork, (828) 743-3222.
In Highlands you may call Food Pantry of Highlands Director Sharon Giddens at (828) 482-0558 or Faviola Olvera at the IFC, (828) 526-0890.

by Jenny King

The toe-tapping music of 
Timeless Highway is sponsored for Craft Beer Night by the generosity of Diane and Ray McPhail.

Here for the Beer

The toe-tapping music of  Timeless Highway is sponsored for Craft Beer Night by the generosity of Diane and Ray McPhail.

The toe-tapping music of Timeless Highway is sponsored for Craft Beer Night by the generosity of Diane and Ray McPhail.

Sample the suds at the Rotary Club of Highlands’ Craft Beer Night, Thursday, September 10, at The Farm at Old Edwards Inn.

Cool fall nights are the perfect time to gather with friends and enjoy a brew. The Farm at Old Edwards Inn will be rocking on Thursday night, September 10, as the Rotary Club of Highlands celebrates its inaugural Craft Beer Night.
You’ll enjoy exciting craft beers from regional breweries with special attention to the best brews from throughout our region. Additionally, you can nibble on tasty appetizers from local eateries as you enjoy your favorite Bluegrass music by Timeless Highway with Tommy Dodd. Timeless Highway is sponsored by Diane and
Ray McPhail.
Grab an early dinner, settle the youngsters and their sitter in front of their favorite movie and come on out for a night of fun. If you’re not a beer drinker, don’t worry. There will also be wine and non-alcoholic beverages. Remember to bring your I.D. as the enjoyment is limited to those 21 years old and older.
You’ll enjoy a night of good music, great beers, and tasty snacks in a beautiful setting. Individual tickets are $50 per person or you can sponsor a table. The fun runs from 7:00 to 11:00 P.M. Tickets on sale at rotarycraftbeer.eventbrite.com
The proceeds from this and all other Rotary fundraising events underwrite the many philanthropic endeavors that benefit our community. See you there!

by Wiley Sloan

September_Laurel_Cover

Dazzling Dahlias Festival

Dahlia_festival_highlands_historical_society_nc_five

Dahlia_festival_highlands_historical_society_nc

Local dahlias, in all their kaleidoscopic glory, will share the spotlight at the fifth annual Dazzling Dahlias Festival –  Saturday, September 10, at the Highlands Rec Park.

Local dahlias, in all their kaleidoscopic glory, will share the spotlight at the fifth annual Dazzling Dahlias Festival –
Saturday, September 12, at the Highlands Rec Park.

Dahlia_festival_highlands_historical_society_nc_fourSoon we’ll celebrate the fifth annual Dazzling Dahlias Festival.
Highlands Country Club’s Hudson House will be jumping on Thursday night, September 10, as patrons of the Highlands Historical Society celebrate the beauty of dahlias and enjoy delicious Mexican cuisine prepared by Club Chef Bryant Withers. Good food, frosty margaritas and wine, plus lively mariachi music provide winning combination.
There are a few tickets available at $125 per person. Send your checks to Highlands Historical Society, P. O. Box 670, Highlands, N.C. 28741. Buy several raffle tickets for the great items donated by local merchants plus there’s an exceptional painting by local artist Lyle Nichols in silent auction.
The Flower Show is Saturday, September 12, at the Highlands Recreation Center from 1:00 to 5:00 P.M. A donation of $5 is appreciated. Over 300 entries filled the Rec Center during last year’s festival. Fill your home with beautiful dahlia bouquets available for purchase. Anyone who has extra dahlias to donate, please bring them to the Rec Park. See flowers of all colors (except for blue — no one has perfected that color) and sizes ranging from the diminutive anemone dahlia to the astonishing dinner plate dahlia.
Dahlia growers can register their blossoms for the competition on Friday from 5:00 to 7:00 P.M. or on Saturday morning from 8:00 to 10:00 A.M. The Rec Center is located across from First Citizens Bank on US 64, just four blocks from Main Street.
Well-known dahlia enthusiast Marty Andreas will speak on the techniques of growing dahlias on Saturday. His garden in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, is resplendent with dahlias of all sizes and colors. The youngsters attending HHS’s Kelsey Kids camp received their own dahlia bulbs courtesy of Marty. Be sure to see their entries in this year’s show.
For more details, go to highlandshistory.com or call the Historical Society at (828) 787-1050. Proceeds raised by the festival support the many programs of HHS, including upkeep of the Prince House, the oldest home within the town limits.

by Wiley Sloan | Cover Painting by Janet Cummings

dargan_garden_cashiers_nc

Fall Garden Fire-up

Dovecote is abuzz with new topics this fall — Wrought Iron Garden Landscape Lighting for Night Owls, a Garden Tour of Outdoor Fire Pits & Places, and Wrought Iron in the Landscape. For more information or to register call (828) 743-0307 or visit dargan.com/dovecote-events.

Fancy a gateway, stone arch, or monolithic atmospheric sculpture to commemorate a special event? Carl Peverall returns to Dovecote with a special showing of his finest work to date. Carl is no stranger to the Highlands-Cashiers community, having exhibited here for the past two summers. His work is informed by the power and beauty of nature. Stones speak to him and they are collected far and wide; sometimes the sculpture just fits naturally together. Other times, the sculpture consists of ironwork branch, a molded ceramic piece, or a series of large, flat river pebbles. Join us September 4 at Dovecote. Attendance is free of charge.
Don’t be in the dark this winter! Add a little sparkle in your landscape with Chris Wakefield’s special lighting secrets. The Outdoor Lights team has created magical places outside at night for over 16 years. Chris is a skilled designer of premium landscape lighting for exclusive properties in Georgia, across the United States, and recent international projects. Along with his collaborative approach, Chris brings extensive experience and vast knowledge of lighting and landscaping which results in a unique, customized lighting design. Chris and his team at The Outdoor Lights have installed over 3,000 lighting systems in the Southeast and received numerous awards for lighting and design excellence. Don’t miss this opportunity to learn from a master on September 11. Attendance is Free.
“Gather thee ‘round the fire” – ever has there been a better time to create an outdoor setting for communal warmth, be it fireplace, fire pit, or ring, study with the masters? On September 25, enjoy a garden study tour with Mary Palmer Dargan and a special guest speaker who share several examples of this outdoor room and take you high into the mountains and into sheltered woodlands. Learn the secrets to designing and implementing the specialty fire areas for success the first time. Availability is limited.
The Dargan’s Dovecote Porch and Gardens is located at 35 Flash Point Lane (McKinny Way) next to Cornucopia Restaurant on Highway 107 in Cashiers. Please contact Mary Palmer Dargan at (828) 743-0307 or dargan.com/dovecote-events for further details and to register for these classes.

Bingo Dollars for Day Care

Highlands Bingo, set for 6:30 P.M. Thursday, September 3, at the Community Building will benefit The Gordon Center for Children.

Mark your calendar for the Rotary Club of Highlands Bingo night on Thursday, September 3. This event will benefit The Gordon Center for Children – a day care/education center for ages birth to fifth grade. An outreach program of Highlands United Methodist Church and the Episcopal Church of the Incarnation, the center includes programs for children of multiple ages.
Bingo fun begins at 6:30 P.M. and runs for about two hours. Let’s fill the Community Building at the corner of Poplar Street and US 64 — next to the ball park. Bingo costs $1 per card per game. There will be 15 games with the last game being a grand cash prize game.
This community-wide effort provides after school care free of charge to elementary and middle school students. Students participate in enrichment activities through partnerships with The Bascom, Highlands Nature Center, Highlands-Cashiers Land Trust and the HUMC music program. The Gordon Center is proud to have the Rotary Club as one of its program partners.
Won’t you support the center by having a table ad for $50? If you don’t have a business to advertise, just let the ad say something as simple as “John and Sue Smith support The Gordon Center for Children.” All of the money paid for sponsorships/ads goes to the center. Checks should be made out to The Gordon Center for Children. Give Executive Director Allison Tate a call at (828) 526-0388 to let her know you want an ad.
Enjoy free refreshments in a family atmosphere. Rotary Bingo is one of the many ways the Rotary Club of Highlands participates in supporting non-profit organizations in the Highlands area.

by Wiley Sloan

Where Enrichment Rocks

The Center for Life Enrichment explores the wonders of the natural world and the intricacies of culture and 21st century life. For information, visit clehighlands.com or call (828) 526-8811.

We kick off the month with Karyn Tomczak, a former eye-level kicker Radio City Rockette. Karyn will share the history of this world famous precision dance troupe as well as some of the “tricks of the trade.”
Grab a sweatshirt and head with us a to a football game at Western Carolina University with seats in the Chancellor’s Box on the 50-yard line and a reception at the chancellor’s home.
Have a favorite “Downton Abbey” character? Cornelia Powell is probing into the character, Countess Cora Crowley of the hit show.
Looking for an enticing and appetizing dining experience? Dine at the home of Ed and Penny Mawyer with Julio from Paoletti’s or have lunch at one of Highland’s finest restaurants …On the Verandah.
There are abundant chances to learn about nature and issues affecting the environment throughout the month. Western Carolina University professor Jim Costa delves into the catastrophe of Soviet biological research that backfired in “The Lysenko Affair: Soviet and Scientific Tragedy.”
The benefits of honey go beyond the delectable flavor — New Zealand beekeeper Mike Everly will explain the workings of honeybees and colonies and explore the many benefits of honey. Nature has wrought some catastrophes in recent times and Dr. Helen Aves discusses them, emphasizing why they happen and to what extent they can be predicted in her lecture “Tsunamis, Earthquakes, and Volcanoes: The Titanic Forces of Nature.”
Husband and wife locals Canty Worley and Sonya Carpenter will spark your enthusiasm for native plants and their benefit to the environment in “Native Plants of the Highlands Plateau.”
There are still several opportunities to take that Apple/iPad class you might have missed with Nigel Sixsmith as well!
To register for any of these or other lectures/classes offered by the Center for Life Enrichment, call (828) 526-8811 or visit clehighlands.com or stop by our office located in the lower level of the Peggy Crosby Center at 348 South Fifth Street in Highlands. Walk-ins to lectures are welcome.

Contributed by Bonnie Dayton

Saturdays on Pine, the raucous free concert series in downtown Highlands, wraps up on September 5 with the Charles Walker Band. Friday Night Live at Town Square has a full slate of free September concerts.

Winding Down and Winding Up

Saturdays on Pine, the raucous free concert series in downtown Highlands, wraps up on September 5 with the Charles Walker Band. Friday Night Live at Town Square has a full slate of free September concerts.

There’s a crispness in the air, the days are growing shorter, the katydids are singing their fall lullabies, but Highlands is not quite ready to roll up the sidewalks and call it a season, not by a
long shot.
Fall represents one of the most pleasant seasons to take in all that Highlands has to offer. Live music at one of our weekend concert series tops many people’s lists of things not to be missed. These concerts have become family favorites and are the place to be on Friday and Saturday nights.
The ever-popular Saturdays on Pine, sponsored by the Highlands Chamber of Commerce, have been a real hit this season at the newly renovated Kelsey-Hutchinson Park. Labor Day weekend marks the last such concert of this season, so make plans now to go out and enjoy the show on Saturday, September 5, by the Charles Walker Band. Pack a picnic, or pick up a to-go order at a nearby restaurant, bring your lawn chairs or blankets and come dance the night away, or simply sit back, relax, and let the sounds carry you away. The show starts at 6:00 P.M.
While Saturdays on Pine are winding up for the season, Friday Night Live at Town Square is just hitting its stride and will continue to delight crowds with concerts through October. Shows start at 6:00 P.M. and the September lineup is a great one, bringing back crowd favorites and a few new faces as well. On September 4 The Southern Highlands Band will take the stage; September 11 crowd favorite Tallulah River Band returns for a show; September 18 will feature the Todd Prusin Duet and completing the month on September 25 will be Macon
Grass Band.
For more information about Saturdays on Pine or Friday Night Live visit highlandschamber.org or call (828) 526-2112.

by Mary Jane McCall | Photo by Marjorie Christiansen

A heady mixture of jazz and Cajun savories highlight 
Highlands on the Half-Shell, set for 12:30 P.M. Sunday, October 4, at the Highlands Nature Center’s Amphitheater. Proceeds from this party will support the Highlands 
Biological Foundation.

Son-of-a-Gun, Gonna Have Big Fun

On Sunday, October 4, a group of Highlands residents are hosting Highlands on the Half-Shell in the amphitheater behind the Nature Center to support the Highlands Biological Foundation.
Feast on oysters and gumbo while enjoying the energetic tunes of Asheville’s Firecracker Jazz Band. The fun starts at 12:30 P.M. and will last until 3:30. Come dressed in your favorite “Cajun casual.”
Tickets are $100 for members and $125 for non-members. To purchase tickets, visit highlandsbiological.org/half-shell/. This event is hosted by Nancy and Lyle Nichols, Martha and Hal Stibbs, Jennie and Sto Stowers, Cookie and Harrison Jones, Julia and Bill Grumbles, Amanda and Greg Gregory, Vevie and Lawrence Dimmitt, Paul Sanger, Diane and Ray McPhail, Miriam and Vernon Skiles, Glenda and Griffin Bell, and Ruth and Barry Edwards.
The Highlands Biological Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that provides critical support for the Biological Station and it’s three facets — the Nature Center, Botanical Garden, and Biological Laboratory. Thanks to the generosity of members and community residents, admission to the Nature Center and Botanical Garden
are free.
Join us to support the mission of the Highlands Biological Station – “To foster research and education focused on the rich natural heritage of the southern Appalachian mountains.” Knowing that your support is directly contributing to conservation efforts, research, and education to better understand the exceptional organisms in the southern Appalachian Mountains, you’ll find that oysters and gumbo have never tasted – and jazz never sounded — so good.

Contributed by Sonya Carpenter