Category Archives: Events in Highlands NC and Cashiers NC

A Shop With A Cop Christmas

The Rotary Club of Highlands will partner for the seventh year with the Macon County Sheriff’s Department and the Highlands Police Department on December 4 for Shop with a Cop Rotary Bingo to benefit the Macon County Shop with a Cop Program.
Shop with a Cop provides Christmas to more than 200 Macon Country children who otherwise would have little or no Christmas. Each child is taken to Walmart by a law enforcement officer and will have $100 to spend with only a couple of conditions: first, they must buy something for themselves and second, something for someone else.
When they’ve finished shopping with officers, the children will have lunch and a Christmas party where presents are wrapped, following a visit with Santa Claus complete with photos.
“Many of the children come from difficult circumstances, where law enforcement officers are perceived as bad guys,” says Macon County Sheriff Robbie Holland. “Shop with a Cop works to change that image through friendship and participating in a Christmas that otherwise wouldn’t happen.”
Highlands Police Chief Bill Harrell joins Sheriff Holland saying, “Shop with a Cop is a positive experience not only for the children involved but also for our officers.”
Shop with a Cop Rotary Bingo has been a significant revenue stream for this program. If you can’t attend the Bingo Night, slated for 6:30 P.M. December 4 at the Highlands Community Building, you can make a donation and drop it off at the Highlands Police Department, the Recreation Park front desk, or give it to any Highlands Rotarian.

Contributed by David Stroud, Highlands Rotary Club

The Players’ Gift

Truman Capote’s “A Christmas Memory” will serve as The Highlands  Cashiers Players’ Holiday Reading at the Highlands Performing Arts Center – 7:00 P.M. Thursday, December 18.  There is no admission fee and everyone is invited.

Truman Capote’s “A Christmas Memory” will serve as The Highlands
Cashiers Players’ Holiday Reading at the Highlands Performing Arts Center – 7:00 P.M. Thursday, December 18.
There is no admission fee and everyone is invited.

The Highlands Cashiers Players once again present their annual Holiday Reading at 7:00 P.M. Thursday, December 18, at the Highlands Performing Arts Center.
HCP Board members, cast and crew alike join together at the Highlands Performing Arts Center to offer this gift to the community. Each year is a different festively wrapped package that usually includes poetry, humorous readings, spiritual messages and song. The 2014 program will be especially touching with a staged reading of “A Christmas Memory,” by Truman Capote.
“A Christmas Memory” is rich with evocative language that conjures up life in rural Alabama and the childhood of a boy who is placed in the care of his elderly relatives. It paints a vibrant picture of the closeness forged between two people who choose to focus on the simple pleasures and rituals of life.
Several HCP actors will be participating, with veteran performer Dean Zuch serving as narrator. Music of the season will be included and refreshments will be served after the performance. No tickets or reservations are needed as the program is and has always been the Players’ gift to the community. Join the cast of “A Christmas Memory” and let them give you a present you’ll enjoy and long remember.

by Jenny King

A Festival of Lights

The Villlage Green, Cashiers’ jewel at the Crossroads, will shine for the holidays with Christmas on the Green.

The Villlage Green, Cashiers’ jewel at the Crossroads, will shine for the holidays with Christmas on the Green.

Looking for a little sparkle this holiday season?
Bring your family and friends to The Village Green for Cashiers’ third annual Christmas On the Green celebration. The 12.5-acre park in the heart of Cashiers will feature thousands of twinkling lights and trees decorated by local merchants and organizations from Thanksgiving weekend until New Year’s Day.
“The Village Green exists to enhance the quality of community life by offering events like Christmas On the Green where people can make meaningful holiday memories,” says Jochen Lucke, Chairperson of The Village Green Board of Directors.
The Village Green is conserved and maintained by a nonprofit organization. “The Village Green is distinctive in that it is a free, public park for everyone to enjoy,” says Self. “However, the park receives no public funding and relies on the generosity of individual donors for its operation.” For more information, visit www.villagegreencashiersnc.com.
Parking is available at the entrance near the Gazebo, off of Highway 64 East, and at the entrance to Village Commons on Frank Allen Road in Cashiers. Like The Village Green on Facebook or follow on Twitter @cashiersgreen.

A Joyful Noise

First Presbyterian Church of Highlands will host a Christmas Carol Sing at 2:00 P.M. Saturday, December 6. Everyone is invited to listen and join in.

First Presbyterian Church of Highlands will host a Christmas Carol Sing at 2:00 P.M. Saturday, December 6. Everyone is invited to listen and join in.

There will be a Christmas Carol Sing at the First Presbyterian Church at 2:00 P.M. on Saturday, December 6, after the parade.
Stell Huie will be the song leader with Angie Jenkins at the piano. If you enjoy singing familiar Christmas carols, you will definitely want to make this a part of your Christmas tradition.
The church is located at the corner of Main and Fifth Streets. Handicap entrances are located on Fifth Street and on
Church Street.

A Tradition for 40 Years

The 40th edition of the Cashiers Christmas Parade is offered with a generous helping of Christmas joy blended with a most  cheerful community spirit -- noon Saturday, December 13, at the Crossroads.

The 40th edition of the Cashiers Christmas Parade is offered with a generous helping of Christmas joy blended with a most
cheerful community spirit — noon Saturday, December 13, at the Crossroads.

It’s been a tradition for 40 years.
The Annual Cashiers Christmas Parade has grown exponentially and has delighted onlookers with a wide variety of entries. With this year’s parade, held on Saturday, December 13, they will be celebrating not only their 40th Anniversary but the 50th Anniversary of the Sapphire Valley Ski Resort as well.
Built in 1964 by Gene Howerdd Jr., the resort offered skiers an opportunity to snow ski and enjoy the Ski Sapphire Valley Lodge, which was operated in the one of the oldest homes in Sapphire Valley. To honor the resort, the theme for this year’s parade is “A White Christmas.”
Festivities will begin at noon on Saturday, December 13 (the tradition of second Saturday in December every year). Prizes will be awarded for best entries ranging from the Cashiers Christmas Star to the Fruitcake Award.
With hometown flair, floats, vintage cars, marching band, and four-legged friends will make their way from Cornucopia Restaurant on NC Highway 107 South north to the Cashiers Crossroads, then west on US Highway 64 to Frank Allen Road, ending at the Cashiers Community Center near the Cashiers-Glenville Volunteer Fire Department. Grand Marshal Gene Howerrd, founder of Sapphire Valley Resort, will lead the parade which will also feature Spirit of our Community Award Winners – Volunteer, Citizen, Educator and Business Person of the Year.
Spectators are invited to enjoy the festivities along the 107/64 corridors. The event will stream live on the internet at www.SapphireValley.com and emcee WHLC on-air anchor Steve Day, will commentate from the judges’ stand at the Crossroads. For more information or to register to participate, visit www.CashiersAreaChamber.com. The rain date is Sunday, December 14, at 1:00 P.M.

by Jenny King | Photo by Sarah Valentine

The Round Man Cometh

Santa will explain the true meaning of Christmas at a breakfast  with a his youngest friends, 8:30 A.M. Saturday, December 13, in the  Fellowship Hall of Highlands United Methodist Church.  Reservations are recommended – (828) 526-3376.

Santa will explain the true meaning of Christmas at a breakfast
with a his youngest friends, 8:30 A.M. Saturday, December 13, in the
Fellowship Hall of Highlands United Methodist Church.
Reservations are recommended – (828) 526-3376.

Santa Claus will host a special breakfast for children from 8:30 to 10:30 A.M. Saturday, December 13, at Highlands United Methodist Church.
Stacks of pancakes will fill the plates of the holiday revelers. After breakfast, the children will be entertained with a holiday craft project while they wait their turn to talk with Santa. One of Santa’s elves will share a traditional holiday story. There’ll also be Christmas carols and reminders of what the day truly means to the world.
The breakfast is open to all children. The suggested donation is $10 per family. Reservations should be made by calling the Church at (828) 526-3376 no later than December 9.
“The children will have plenty of time to share their Christmas list with Santa and to have pictures made,” says Jennifer Forrester, Director of Children’s Ministries at HUMC.
The Church is located at 315 Main Street, immediately behind the Town Christmas tree.

by Wiley Sloan

Olde Mountain Christmas Parade

Highlands’ Olde Mountain Christmas Parade, slated for 11:00 A.M. Saturday,  December 6, is a celebration of the best of the holiday spirit. Arrive at Main Street early to witness a community in love with Christmas.

Highlands’ Olde Mountain Christmas Parade, slated for 11:00 A.M. Saturday,
December 6, is a celebration of the best of the holiday spirit. Arrive at Main Street early to witness a community in love with Christmas.

With a population of 942, you may expect Highlands’ Olde Mountain Christmas Parade, slated for 11:00 A.M. Saturday, December 6, to last approximately 173 seconds.
But if that’s what you’re thinking, you haven’t taken into account the town’s deep pool of community spirit. It’s not uncommon for the parade to boast over 80 entries.
There’s a warm, homemade feel to much of the Highlands parade, since it’s staged entirely by local groups, churches, businesses, fire departments and bands of neighbors. It’s all delivered with pride, sparkle and more than a little bit of humor.
You’ll find handmade floats, at least one marching band, dancing garden ladies, dogs that amble more or less information,
fire trucks, Smokey the Bear, camels and Wise Men, classic cars, horses, the Highlands High School Homecoming Court, local politicians, and, of course, Santa. People begin lining Main Street early to ensure they get a good view and to chat with neighbors and visitors. The parade route spans three blocks, so there should be plenty of room for everyone.
If you’re part of a group that would like to be included in the lineup, contact the Highlands Chamber of Commerce at (828) 526-2112 or stop by the Visitor Center, 108 Main Street.
If you’re thinking of inviting Santa to participate in your entry, please note that he’s already accepted the Chamber’s invitation to appear at the end of the parade. You wouldn’t want to confuse the kids.

Do You Hear What I Hear?

It’s a true sign that the Christmas season has arrived when the Highlands Community Christian Chorale performs.
This year, Highlands vocalists will be joined by voices from Sky Valley and Franklin to create a beautiful blend of heavenly voices – at the First Baptist Church of Highlands, 220 Main Street, at 5:00 P.M. Saturday, December 13, and 5:00 P.M. Sunday, December 14.
Plan to stay for the reception following the Sunday concert. The ladies of the Church are well-known for their delicious goodies at these receptions.
This year’s performance will be the 20th year that the chorale has blessed the community. Beginning at Labor Day, each year members of local churches gather each Monday night to hone their skills.
Leadership of the chorale rotates among the various choral directors of area churches. This year’s director is Joe Powell of the First Baptist Church. Joe and his wife retired to Highlands after he completed a career as a high school band director. His plans for a leisurely retirement life have been postponed as he enjoys serving as choir director at First Baptist and leads the Highlands Male Chorus.
Joe has compiled a list of traditional Christmas carols that everyone knows. You’ll hum along to “Silent Night” and “The Little Drummer Boy” (with accompaniment from Joe’s grandson on the drums). Members of the Baptist Church always look forward to a performance of “Silent Night” with vocals by Carolyn Patton accompanied by June Hogue on the piano. This is Joe’s first opportunity to lead the chorale. He has worked closely with artistic director Marybeth Brody to select an unforgettable playlist.
“The dedication of each of these singers is amazing,” says Powell. “They give up their Monday nights for practice, they contribute $10 each toward the cost of music, all for the love of singing and to get to renew old friendships with folks they don’t see except during this season.”
You will get a chance to sing with the chorale during the sing-along number. Come early as the church tends to fill up quickly. Be prepared to share a small donation to help the chorale offset the cost of music.

by Wiley Sloan

HANDS relies upon a dedicated team of cheerful volunteers like Buck Trott.
A classic Christmas dinner will be served from 11:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. December 25 at the Hudson House at Highlands Country Club. Proceeds will benefit a host of local charities. For reservations or more information, call (828) 526-9419.

A Double Helping

HANDS relies upon a dedicated team of cheerful volunteers like Buck Trott. A classic Christmas dinner will be served from 11:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. December 25 at the Hudson House at Highlands Country Club. Proceeds will benefit a host of local charities. For reservations or more information, call (828) 526-9419.

HANDS relies upon a dedicated team of cheerful volunteers like Buck Trott.
A classic Christmas dinner will be served from 11:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. December 25 at the Hudson House at Highlands Country Club. Proceeds will benefit a host of local charities. For reservations or more information, call (828) 526-9419.

The much-anticipated Highlands Annual Christmas Dinner will return to the Hudson House at Highlands Country Club this year; and their own Secret Santa has offered to match up to $30,000 in donations.
Almost every member of the volunteer team is returning to offer a traditional Christmas meal of turkey, ham and tenderloin, dressing, and all the trimmings, plus dessert and a glass of wine for the adults.
The event, created in 2001 because there were no places in Highlands for Highlanders or visitors to have a Christmas Day meal, has also become a source of funding for essential nonprofits in the Highlands area whose goal is to better the community through educational help, child mentoring, dental and medical care and a host of other essential services.
The dinner has helped the Highlands School library purchase additional books. It was also fundamental in establishing the Hospice House of Macon County and supports REACH of Macon County, an organization providing a safe place and shelter for victims of sexual violence and abuse. Over the years the dinner, through its sponsorships and donations, has been able to gift over $200,000 to this community.
This year, their goal will be to maximize this extremely generous gift, and distribute as much as $60,000 to area nonprofit organizations. Each dollar donated becomes two dollars, that thousand dollar donation becomes $2,000!
“This community is so blessed to have such philanthropic people in our midst,” says one of the organizers, Ricky Siegel. “Help us maximize this generous offer by being a sponsor for $100 as a Candle, $250 as an Ornament, $500 as a Present, $1,000 as a Star, or anything above $1,000 as a Superstar.” All donations and sponsorships are 100 percent tax deductible. Checks should be made out to H.A.N.D.S., the Highlands Area Nonprofit Donations Sharing, a 501(c)(3), and mailed to or dropped off at, Lakeside Restaurant, 531 Smallwood Avenue, or mailed to H.A.N.D.S. c/o Ricky Siegel, 55 4 ½ Street, Highlands, NC 28741.
The dinner is by reservation only and may be made by calling (828) 526-9419. Seating will begin at 11:00 A.M. and they will serve until 5:00 P.M. The buffet for adults is $40, children 11 and under is $15, and kids 5 and under are free.
So make your plans to join with friends and family at the Annual Highlands Christmas Dinner community event on Christmas Day and be a sponsor. Help them help those who help Highlands.

by Jenny King

Chivaree Tent Sale and Raffle

clip0016Kick off your holiday shopping in a meaningful way by supporting great American art and CHHS.  Acclaimed artist Aaron Hequembourg will be at Chivaree for two days only (Nov. 28-29, 10-5) for a special indoor/outdoor sale.  10% of all sales receipts go to CHHS.  And enter our raffle for a chance to own “Dachshund Girl” (pictured)–the prize includes shipping! 100% of ticket proceeds go to CHHS.

Aaron Hequembourg is one of the brightest starts in the universe of southern art, and he will have his entire inventory of highly sought-after, current work available at Chivaree on Black Friday and Saturday.  You’ll find everything from affordable little treasures to major masterworks.  (And inside, you’ll find hot cider and other treats.) Aaron will share the stories behind his multimedia engraved paintings, which incorporate antique materials from his 1815 Georgia farm and have won major awards around the country, including recent Best-of-Show awards at St. Louis, Cherry Creek, Des Moines, Greenville and CottonSouth. He has exhibited twice at the Smithsonian Craft Show and has served as a judge at many of the nation’s most prestigious juried fairs.

Aaron created and donated “Dachshund Girl” especially for this year’s raffle to benefit CHHS.  It’s the Grand Prize, and we’ll ship it for free if you’re not in town for the drawing!  Second prize is $100 Chivaree store credit.  Tickets are $5 and you can buy as many as you want.  100% of ticket proceeds go to CHHS.  Join us for the drawing, followed by a casual cocktail reception with the artist, at 5 pm on Friday 11/28.  You can buy your raffle tickets at Chivaree, CHHS or online here:

Other things you’ll find at the gallery this holiday season include hand-blown glass Christmas ornaments from the NC mountains; NEW animal face jugs by renowned potter/Highlands Mayor Patrick Taylor; letterpress printing by Amos Kennedy with prices for the masses; major vintage works by William Whiteside; and lots of beautiful artisanal jewelry. Everything we sell is made by southern artists and artisans, with a special focus on western North Carolina.

Chivaree is located on Highway 107 N in Cashiers, just north of the crossroads next to Zoller Hardware.  Call (828) 743-6195 or email owner Margaret Browne at mbrowne@chivarts.com.  Closed Thanksgiving Day; open 11/28 and 11/29 from 10 to 5.  Otherwise, November hours are Mon-Sat, 11-5.  December hours are Wed-Sat, 11-5.

Visit Chivaree online at www.chivarts.com or on facebook at facebook.com/chivaree.

Highlands launches its Christmas Season with inimitable small town charm at the Town Tree Lighting, 6:30 P.M. Saturday, November 29.

Highlands Does Christmas Right

Highlands launches its Christmas Season with inimitable small town charm at the Town Tree Lighting, 6:30 P.M. Saturday, November 29.

Highlands launches its Christmas Season with inimitable small town charm at the Town Tree Lighting, 6:30 P.M. Saturday, November 29.

Thanksgiving in Highlands has its own peaceful, bountiful vibe. The air is crisp, the leaves are gone, and the roaring fires feel a little warmer. It’s a chance for families to gather in reflective thankfulness, cocooning in just a bit in anticipation of the holiday season to come.
Family time, that what it’s all about and Highlands’ own Christmas tree lighting caps the Thanksgiving weekend off on a joyful note. The festivities this year will begin on Saturday, November 29, in front of the Highlands Methodist Church at 6:30 P.M.
Main Street is transformed into a festive wonderland with families bundled in their warm sweaters, children gleefully anticipating the arrival of old St. Nick, and neighbors sipping hot chocolate and catching up with friends or making new ones. When the enormous tree is lit we realize the season of magic is upon us. It all adds up to a holiday tradition that is cherished by young and old.
The fun starts with caroling that everyone’s invited to join. A small ceremony features readings from the Bible and storytelling. Cookies and hot chocolate are the perfect complement to a frosty evening. Winners of the merchant’s window contest and the children’s art contest will be announced. Sweatshirts with the winning artwork will be available for sale. Santa will be on hand at the old Chamber of Commerce building on Main Street across from Reeves to hear wishes and appeals.
To prepare for the crowds, Main Street will be closed between Second and Fourth streets beginning at 5:30 P.M.
The Highlands Downtown Tree Lighting is sponsored by the Highlands Chamber of Commerce. For more information, call the Highlands Visitor Center at (828) 526-2112.

by Mary Jane McCall | Photo by Sarah Valentine

Highlands Christmas Parade

The Highlands Olde Mountain Christmas Parade, set for 11:00 A.M. Saturday, December 6, is built upon a generous helping of holiday  cheer and small town pride. It’s pretty amazing.

The Highlands Olde Mountain Christmas Parade, set for 11:00 A.M. Saturday, December 6, is built upon a generous helping of holiday cheer and small town pride. It’s pretty amazing.

With a population of 942, you may expect Highlands’ Olde Mountain Christmas Parade, slated for 11:00 A.M. Saturday, December 6, to last approximately
173 seconds.
But if that’s what you’re thinking, you haven’t taken into account the town’s deep pool of community spirit. It’s not uncommon for the parade to boast over 80 entries.
There’s a warm, homemade feel to much of the Highlands parade, since it’s staged entirely by local groups, churches, businesses, fire departments and bands of neighbors. It’s all delivered with pride, sparkle and more than a little bit of humor.
You’ll find handmade floats, at least one marching band, dancing garden ladies, dogs that amble more or less in formation, fire trucks, Smokey the Bear, camels and Wise Men, classic cars, horses, the Highlands High School Homecoming Court, local politicians, and, of course, Santa. People begin lining Main Street early to ensure they get a good view and to chat with neighbors and visitors. The parade route spans three blocks, so there should be plenty of room for everyone.
If you’re part of a group that would like to be included in the lineup, contact the Highlands Chamber of Commerce at (828) 526-2112 or stop by the Visitor Center, 108 Main Street.
If you’re thinking of inviting Santa to participate in your entry, please note that he’s already accepted the Chamber’s invitation to appear at the end of the parade. You wouldn’t want to confuse the kids.

Read a Book & Take a Look

There’s nothing sleepy about Hudson Library in the fall. For a full list of activities, call (828) 526-3031.

Fall in Highlands is filled with activities. But, if you get tired of leaf-looking, hiking, shopping or dining – or just want an alternative experience, join the fun at Hudson Library and its across-the-street partner, The Bookworm.
Each Wednesday, from 10:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M., the library hosts a community studio art session – Art Your Way! — led by a group of local artists. Most sessions feature a live model and attendees may work with any medium. Tables are provided and a there’s a small fee to pay the models. Everyone’s welcome to join, sit, or observe! For more information, contact Muriel Kolb at (828) 526-3882 or the Hudson Library at
(828) 526-3031.
Perhaps you’ve heard that every dog has his day. At Hudson Library, that day is Tuesday. Every Tuesday, from 3:30 to 5:30 P.M., children ages 6 to 12 are invited to visit the Hudson Library to practice early reading skills in a comfortable, non-judgmental environment by reading to our canine companion, Beebles. This adorable, registered therapy dog is an Old English Sheepdog with the group READing Paws. The Reading Education Assistance Dogs (R.E.A.D.) program improves children’s reading and communication skills by employing a powerful method — reading to a dog, but not just any dog.
Sign up at the library desk or call (828) 526-3031. Drop-ins (adults included) are also welcome. For more information on the program, visit www.fontanalib.org or
www.READingPaws.org.
The library hosts Movie Night, every Tuesday at 6:00 P.M. Join us for a mixture of classic and recently-released movies and documentaries. The movies are free! You’re welcome to bring your own snacks and refreshments. All ages are welcome, but not all films are appropriate for all audiences. Please visit the library for a listing of upcoming movies.
The Bookworm, located on Main Street directly across from Hudson Library, is a non-profit organization that sells gently used books, movies and CDs. If you have any books, movies or CDs that you would like to donate, please consider bringing them to us. We accept everything except text books, encyclopedias, Readers’ Digest and Time Life Books. Our hours are Monday through Saturday from 10:00 A.M. until 4:00 P.M. For more information, call us at (828) 482-0326.

Contributed by Beverly Pittman

Bring a piece of an Old Mountain Christmas home and help children in the community by buying a tree from Snowbird Farms. 
For more information, call (828) 526-3376.

Lighting up Lives

Bring a piece of an Old Mountain Christmas home and help children in the community by buying a tree from Snowbird Farms.  For more information, call (828) 526-3376.

Bring a piece of an Old Mountain Christmas home and help children in the community by buying a tree from Snowbird Farms. For more information, call (828) 526-3376.

For many of us, Highlands’ Christmas Season starts with the Town Tree Lighting on the front lawn of Highlands United Methodist Church on Main Street, set for Saturday,
November 29.
But this year things start a little bit earlier.
The Gordon Center for Children will be selling Christmas trees to help local families from 10:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. November 28 and 29. The trees are being donated by Snowbird Farms in Cullowhee, North Carolina. These will be gorgeous, freshly-cut 6- and 8-foot trees, selling for $40 and $50. You can beautify your home and help these children, since 100 percent of the proceeds will go to help fund the Gordon Center.
To pre-order a tree, call (828) 526-3376 or send an e-mail to highlandsumc@icloud.com.
There are 218 children ages birth through fifth grade in the Highlands community. During its first year of operation, the Gordon Center has touched approximately one in three children within this age group.

by Wiley Sloan

The Players’ Gift, A Memory

Truman Capote’s “A Christmas Memory” will serve as The Highlands Cashiers Players’ Holiday Reading at the Highlands Performing Arts Center  – 7:00 P.M. Thursday, December 18. There is no admission fee and everyone is invited.

Truman Capote’s “A Christmas Memory” will serve as The Highlands Cashiers Players’ Holiday Reading at the Highlands Performing Arts Center – 7:00 P.M. Thursday, December 18. There is no admission fee and everyone is invited.

The Highlands Cashiers Players once again presents their annual Holiday Reading at 7:00 P.M. Thursday, December 18, at the Highlands Performing Arts Center.
HCP Board members, cast and crew alike join together at the Highlands Performing Arts Center to offer this gift to the community. Each year is a different festively wrapped package that usually includes poetry, humorous readings, spiritual messages and song. The 2014 program will be especially touching with a staged reading of “A Christmas Memory,” by Truman Capote.
“A Christmas Memory” is rich with evocative language that conjures up life in rural Alabama and the childhood of a boy who is placed in the care of his elderly relatives. It paints a vibrant picture of the closeness forged between two people who choose to focus on the simple pleasures and rituals of life.
Several HCP actors will be participating, with veteran performer Dean Zuch serving as narrator. Music of the season will be included and refreshments will be served after the performance. No tickets or reservations are needed as the program is and has always been the Players’ gift to the community. Join the cast of “A Christmas Memory” and let them give you a present you’ll enjoy and long remember.

by Jenny King

Shop With a Cop

Shop with a Cop Bingo, slated for 6:30 P.M. Thursday, December 4, at the Highlands Community Building, supports an important program that pairs law enforcement officers with needy children.

The Rotary Club of Highlands will partner for the seventh year with the Macon County Sheriff’s Department and the Highlands Police Department on December 4 for Shop with a Cop Rotary Bingo to benefit the Macon County Shop with a Cop Program.
Shop with a Cop provides Christmas to more than 200 Macon Country children who otherwise would have little or no Christmas. Each child is taken to Walmart by a law enforcement officer and will have $100 to spend with only a couple of conditions: first, they must buy something for themselves and second, something for someone else.
When they’ve finished shopping with officers, the children will have lunch and a Christmas party where presents are wrapped, following a visit with Santa Claus complete
with photos.
“Many of the children come from difficult circumstances, where law enforcement officers are perceived as bad guys,” says Macon County Sheriff Robbie Holland. “Shop with a Cop works to change that image through friendship and participating in a Christmas that otherwise wouldn’t happen.”
Highlands Police Chief Bill Harrell joins Sheriff Holland saying, “Shop with a Cop is a positive experience not only for the children involved but also for our officers.”
Shop with a Cop Rotary Bingo has been a significant revenue stream for this program. If you can’t attend the Bingo Night, slated for 6:30 P.M. December 4 at the Highlands Community Building, you can make a donation and drop it off at the Highlands Police Department, the Recreation Park front desk, or give it to any Highlands Rotarian.

Contributed by David Stroud, Highlands Rotary Club

Hands of a Hundred

The Hard Candy Christmas Art & Craft, set for November 28-29 in Cullowhee, North Carolina, is as much a cherished mountain tradition  as the crafts and creations that it offers. For more information, call (828) 524-3405.

The Hard Candy Christmas Art & Craft, set for November 28-29 in Cullowhee, North Carolina, is as much a cherished mountain tradition as the crafts and creations that it offers. For more information, call (828) 524-3405.

The Hard Candy Christmas Art & Craft Show opens for its 27th year inside Western Carolina University’s Ramsey Center in Cullowhee, North Carolina.
This much anticipated event features authentic crafts from the hands of 100 regional and local artists and craftsmen.
In the Depression years in the mountains, Christmas was always celebrated with stockings stuffed with apples, oranges and hard candy. The best gifts were handmade with love.
Customers line up early for the first selection of pottery, wood crafts, master jewelers, baskets, glass art, and specialty sweets and breads. Collectors of heirloom ornaments and miniatures always find something new.
Some lucky person is going to win a Gingerbread House constructed by the featured artist, Kathy Circa of Backwoods Bakery. Her work is pictured above. Sign up at her booth for the drawing at the show’s conclusion. Take home organic bread and gingerbread cookies for the houseguests!
Several exhibitors will have holiday table arrangements and decorations. Purchase a fresh mountain greenery wreath or scented dried fruit rope for your house. Ronnie Evans will be strumming favorite Christmas songs and selling his CDs to take home.
No wonder it has grown from a little show in Franklin with eight exhibitors to the largest Christmas gift show in Western North Carolina!
Hours are 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. each day with convenient free parking. Adults at $4, with children under 12 free.
At the ticket table, have a piece of peppermint candy and an apple from Barber Orchards of Waynesville, North Carolina, and catch the Christmas Spirit!
For more information, visit www.mountainArtisans.net, email djhunter@dnet.net, or call (828) 524 3405.

Contributed by Doris Hunter

The Villlage Green, Cashiers’ jewel at the Crossroads, will shine for the holidays with Christmas on the Green. The season starts with a party with Santa, treats, music and a Christmas Tree Lighting, November 28.

Christmas on the Green

The Villlage Green, Cashiers’ jewel at the Crossroads, will shine for the holidays with Christmas on the Green. The season starts with a party with Santa, treats, music and a Christmas Tree Lighting, November 28.

The Villlage Green, Cashiers’ jewel at the Crossroads, will shine for the holidays with Christmas on the Green. The season starts with a party with Santa, treats, music and a Christmas Tree Lighting, November 28.

Looking for a little sparkle this holiday season?
Bring your family and friends to The Village Green for Cashiers’ third annual Christmas On the Green celebration. The 12.5-acre park in the heart of Cashiers will feature thousands of twinkling lights and trees decorated by local merchants and organizations from Thanksgiving weekend until New Year’s Day.
Get into the holiday spirit with an afternoon of fun with family and friends Friday, November 28, at the Gazebo of The Village Green near the crossroads of Highways 64 and 107. Come share your Christmas wishes with Santa and Mrs. Claus from 2:00 to 5:00 P.M. Gather around the fire pit for S’Mores and More. Listen to holiday music and strolling carolers beginning at 5:30 P.M. that evening for the Cashiers Christmas Tree lighting ceremony. The highlight of the day will be when the switch is turned on to illuminate the 60 foot spruce in the center of the village of Cashiers. “This has become a treasured tradition for residents and visitors in the area,” comments Ann Self, Executive Director of The Village Green.
“The Village Green exists to enhance the quality of community life by offering events like Christmas On the Green where people can make meaningful holiday memories,” says Jochen Lucke, Chairperson of The Village Green Board of Directors.
The Village Green is conserved and maintained by a nonprofit organization. “The Village Green is distinctive in that it is a free, public park for everyone to enjoy,” says Self. “However, the park receives no public funding and relies on the generosity of individual donors for its operation.” For more information, visit www.villagegreencashiersnc.com.
Parking is available at the entrance near the Gazebo, off of Highway 64 East, and at the entrance to Village Commons on Frank Allen Road in Cashiers. Like The Village Green on Facebook or follow on Twitter @cashiersgreen.

Photo by Sarah Valentine

A Crossroads Christmas

At 40 years old, The Annual Cashiers Christmas Parade has lost none of its sweet small town charm. Join the fun at noon Saturday, December 13.

At 40 years old, The Annual Cashiers Christmas Parade has lost none of its sweet small town charm. Join the fun at noon Saturday, December 13.

It’s been a tradition for 40 years.
The Annual Cashiers Christmas Parade has grown exponentially and has delighted onlookers with a wide variety of entries. With this year’s parade, held on Saturday, December 13, they will be celebrating not only their 40th Anniversary but the 50th Anniversary of the Sapphire Valley Ski Resort as well.
Built in 1964 by Gene Howerdd Jr., the resort offered skiers an opportunity to snow ski and enjoy the Ski Sapphire Valley Lodge, which was operated in the one of the oldest homes in Sapphire Valley. To honor the resort, the theme for this year’s parade is “A White Christmas.”
Festivities will begin at noon on Saturday, December 13 (the tradition of second Saturday in December every year). Prizes will be awarded for best entries ranging from the Cashiers Christmas Star to the Fruitcake Award.
With hometown flair, floats, vintage cars, marching band and four-legged friends will make their way from Cornucopia Restaurant on NC Highway 107 South north to the Cashiers Crossroads, then west on US Highway 64 to Frank Allen Road, ending at the Cashiers Community Center near the Cashiers-Glenville Volunteer Fire Department. Grand Marshal Gene Howerrd, founder of Sapphire Valley Resort, will lead the parade which will also feature Spirit of our Community Award Winners — Volunteer, Citizen, Educator and Business Person of the Year.
Spectators are invited to enjoy the festivities along the 107/64 corridors. The event will stream live on the internet at www.SapphireValley.,com and emcee WHLC on-air anchor Steve Day, will commentate from the judges’ stand at the Crossroads. For more information or to register to participate, visit www.CashiersAreaChamber.com. The rain date is Sunday, December 14, at 1:00 P.M.

by Jenny King | Photo by Sarah Valentine

By Golly, Be Jolly!

Santa Claus returns to Highlands United Methodist Church for a breakfast with all of his young friends, 8:30 A.M.  Saturday, December 13. For reservations, call (828) 526-3376.

Santa Claus returns to Highlands United Methodist Church for a breakfast with all of his young friends, 8:30 A.M.
Saturday, December 13. For reservations, call (828) 526-3376.

Santa Claus will host a special breakfast for children from 8:30 to 10:30 A.M. Saturday, December 13, at Highlands United Methodist Church.
Stacks of pancakes will fill the plates of the holiday revelers. After breakfast, the children will be entertained with a holiday craft project while they wait their turn to talk with Santa. One of Santa’s elves will share a traditional holiday story. There’ll also be Christmas carols and reminders of what the day truly means to the world.
The Fellowship Hall will be decked in holiday splendor. The breakfast is open to all children. The suggested donation is $10 per family. Reservations should be made by calling the Church at (828) 526-3376 no later than December 9.
“The children will have plenty of time to share their Christmas list with Santa and to have pictures made,’ says Jennifer Forrester, Director of Children Ministries at HUMC. “Make your reservations early and come out for a stellar holiday celebration with Santa.”
The Church is located at 315 Main Street, immediately behind the Town Christmas tree.

by Wiley Sloan

Merrily Caroly

first_Pres_carol_singThere will be a Christmas Carol Sing at First Presbyterian Church at 2:00 P.M. on Saturday, December 6, after the parade. Stell Huie will be the song leader with Angie Jenkins at the piano. If you enjoy singing familiar Christmas carols, you will definitely want to make this a part of your Christmas tradition. The church is located at the corner of Main and Fifth Streets. Handicap entrances are located on Fifth Street and on Church Street.

Christmas Carol Sing to Follow Parade on Dec. 6

Community Chorale to Perform

The Highlands Community Christmas Chorale, set for Saturday, December 13, and Sunday, December 14, at First Baptist Church of Highlands, is a pure celebration of the miracle of Christ’s Birth.

It’s a true sign that the Christmas season has arrived when the Highlands Community Christian Chorale performs.
This year Highlands vocalists will be joined by voices from Sky Valley and Franklin to create a beautiful blend of heavenly voices – at First Baptist Church of Highlands, 220 Main Street, at 5:00 P.M. Saturday, December 13, and 5:00 P.M. Sunday, December 14.
Plan to stay for the reception following the Sunday concert. The ladies of the Church are well-known for their delicious goodies at these receptions.
This year’s performance will be the 20th year that the chorale has blessed the community. Beginning at Labor Day, each year members of local churches gather each Monday night to hone their skills.
Leadership of the chorale rotates among the various Choral Directors of area churches. This year’s director is Joe Powell of the First Baptist Church. Joe and his wife retired to Highlands after he completed a career as a high school band director. His plans for a leisurely retirement life here have been postponed as he enjoys serving as Choir Director at First Baptist and leads the Highlands Male Chorus.
Joe has compiled a list of traditional Christmas carols that everyone knows. You’ll hum along to “Silent Night” and “The Little Drummer Boy” (with accompaniment from Joe’s grandson on the drums). Members of the Baptist Church always look forward to a performance of “Silent Night” with vocals by Carolyn Patton accompanied by June Hogue on the piano.
This is Joe’s first opportunity to lead the chorale. He has worked closely with the chorale’s artistic director Marybeth Brody to select an unforgettable playlist.
“The dedication of each of these singers is amazing,” says Powell. “They give up their Monday nights for practice, they contribute $10 each toward the cost of music, all for the love of singing and to get to renew old friendships with folks they don’t see except during this season.”
You will get a chance to sing with the chorale during the sing-along number. Come early as the church tends to fill up quickly. Be prepared to share a small donation to help the chorale offset the cost of music.

A Visit with Santa

Highlands will always have a place for Santa – you can see him  Saturdays in December (except December 6)  on Main Street across from Reeves Hardware.

Highlands will always have a place for Santa – you can see him
Saturdays in December (except December 6)
on Main Street across from Reeves Hardware.

Now that the holiday season is here, a lot of kids and more than a few adults are making their lists and checking them twice. It is time to find out if they’ve been naughty or nice. Many believe it’s not too late to make up for lost time and be a little nicer in order to make sure they make the coveted nice list. They know Santa is coming to town and will be at the old Chamber of Commerce location on Main Street across from Reeves Hardware. He’ll be there Saturdays in December before Christmas from 11:00-3:00, except December 6.
Even in the hectic days leading up to Christmas, Santa manages to find time to sit and listen to his friends, and Highlands has long been one of his favorite spots. The clear, crisp air and the smiling, well-behaved children make Highlands the ideal spot for Santa to catch his breath and get ready for the Big Night. Don’t miss your chance to visit and put in those last
minute requests.
If you have questions about Santa’s busy schedule or the events that mark Highlands’ Holiday Season – the Olde Mountain Christmas Parade, the worship schedules of local churches – contact the Highlands Visitor Center
at (828) 526-2112.

by Mary Jane McCall

Dishing up Hope

The Highlands Annual Christmas Dinner, set the for Hudson House at Highlands Country Club, is a celebration of the true meaning of Christmas.  For reservations for a tremendous meal prepared by Lakeside Restaurant Chef Chris Arnold and a dedicated team of volunteers,  call (828) 526-9419 beginning November 9.

The Highlands Annual Christmas Dinner, set the for Hudson House at Highlands Country Club, is a celebration of the true meaning of Christmas.
For reservations for a tremendous meal prepared by Lakeside Restaurant Chef Chris Arnold and a dedicated team of volunteers,
call (828) 526-9419 beginning November 9.

Imagine this: It’s 2001 and you’re visiting Highlands for Christmas. Or perhaps you have a houseful of holiday guests but don’t want to cook on Christmas Day.
Where do you eat?
Back then there were no options. So a small group of volunteers decided to spend their Christmas Day feeding the community and giving the profits to local charities. It was such a success that in the last 13 years, the Highlands Annual Christmas Dinner has been able to donate well over $200,000. This year’s dinner is especially important as an anonymous donor, a “Secret Santa,” has offered to match up to $30,000
in donations.
Where does the money go? Right here in Macon County. A few of the deserving charities that have benefitted from your generosity are The Literacy Council of Highlands; REACH of Macon County; Big Brothers Big Sisters of Highlands; the Highlands Food Pantry; The International Friendship Center; the Free Dental Clinic; the Free Medical Clinic; the Emergency Council; Highlands School Library as well as others.
Held at the Hudson House of Highlands Country Club, the dinner gives Highlanders and visitors a warm and inviting place for their Christmas meal without the planning, shopping, cooking and clean up. Chef Chris Arnold of Lakeside Restaurant will be preparing a traditional feast, which includes turkey, ham, tenderloin, dressing and gravy, plus all the sides. Volunteers will have been baking for weeks ahead of time to make sure there are lots of desserts from which to choose and for adults, a glass of wine, is included. Children 5 and under eat free, the cost for children under 12 is $15, and for adults, the cost is $40.
There are ways to guarantee that the $30,000 is raised other than attending the meal. This year they are offering a variety of sponsorship levels. For $100 you can become a Candle sponsor; for $250 an Ornament sponsor; for $500 a Present sponsor; a Star sponsor for $1,000 or a Super Star sponsor for any amount over $1,000. Funds are managed by H.A.N.D.S, Highlands Area Non-Profit Donation Sharing, a 501 (c)(3) organization and are 100 percent tax deductible. Stop by Lakeside Restaurant on Smallwood Drive in Highlands to drop off your donation or mail a check to H.A.N.D.S c/o Ricky Siegel, 55 4 ½ Street, Highlands NC, 28741.
The dinner will be by reservation only. Reservations may be made beginning November 9 by calling (828) 526-9419.

by Jenny King

Don’t miss the annual Sip and Stroll, Friday and Saturday, November 7 and 8, from 11:00 A.M. until 5:00 P.M.

Sip and Stroll

Don’t miss the annual Sip and Stroll, Friday and Saturday, November 7 and 8, from 11:00 A.M. until 5:00 P.M.

Experience the wares of Highlands’ fine shops, while tasting and enjoying a selection of wine and delightful edibles. Sip, Stroll and Shop till you drop while enjoying everything fabulous in downtown Highlands.
Each stroller will start at the Highlands Chamber of Commerce and Visitor’s Center to receive a detailed map and their own souvenir wine glass with special carry bag. There will be a limited number of merchants this year and we encourage everyone to linger and enjoy the homemade hors d’oeuvres, cheeses, and, of course, the wonderful selections of wines. There’s also an added bonus to visiting each merchant on the map. Strollers having completed the tour will be eligible for wonderful prizes, including fine dining certificates, pottery and specialty wines.
For more information on the Sip and Stroll, Friday night’s Opening Night or Friday and Saturday’s wine dinners call
(828) 526-5841.
Friday Sip and Stroll Participants: The Hen House; Highlands Fine Art & Estate Jewelry; The Southern Way; Bags on Main; TJ Bailey’s for Men; Potpourri 2; Cabin Couture; Acorns; Acorns on Church, Wit’s End, Mountain Fresh Grocery, The Ugly Dob Pub, The Silver Eagle, High Cotton Wine & Cheese Company, and The Park on Main.
Saturday Sip and Stroll Participants: Highland Hiker Cabin, Hiker on Main, Hiker Shoe Store, The Hen House, Highlands Fine Art & Estate Jewelry, The Southern Way, Bags on Main, TJ Bailey’s for Men, Cabin Casuals of Highlands, Potpourri 2, Cabin Couture, Christmas Tree on Main, Acorns, Acorns on Church, Mountain Fresh, The Ugly Dog Pub and High Cotton Wine & Cheese Company.

Don’t miss the annual Sip and Stroll, Friday and Saturday, November 7 and 8, from 11:00 A.M. until 5:00 P.M.

Don’t miss the annual Sip and Stroll, Friday and Saturday, November 7 and 8, from 11:00 A.M. until 5:00 P.M.

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Foodie Extravaganza

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highlands_nc_culinary_weekend-two 2Local restaurants are pulling out all the stops for the Highlands Culinary Weekend, November 6-9. See below for the list of events. For more information, call (828) 526-5841.

Friday Events:
Sip and Stroke at The Bascom: This two-hour afternoon workshop is perfect for non-artists and beginners. Learn to recreate a well-known painting and sip while you stroke! We supply the canvas, paint and brushes. All you need to bring is a curious mind, a friend and a bottle of wine. The Bascom signature wine will be available by the glass. Register today and bring home your very own work of art. The Bascom, (828) 787-2865.
Pinot Noir Master Class: Tasting and presentation of eight Siduri Pinot Noirs with Adam Lee. We will taste eight different Siduri wines from across their California and Oregon portfolio, including some older vintages. Mountaintop Wine Shoppe,
(828) 526-4080.
Mountain Fresh Five Course Porch Dinner: Join us in celebrating the iconic and diverse culinary dishes of James Beard Award-winning chef Louis Osteen as he prepares a multi-course dinner carefully paired with the wines of French and Italian importer Kermit Lynch. $125 per person, Mountain Fresh Grocery,
(828) 526-2400.
Fourth Annual Farm Harvest Dinner and Barn Dance: Get ready for a full-on evening of authentic mountain culture. Your senses will come alive with sights, sounds, smells and flavors of farm-fresh creations being prepared live. Meet the farmers and feast on their bounty from Sunburst Trout Farm, Barker’s Creek Mill and Painted Hills Natural Beef. It’s a fun, down-on-the-farm festival of the senses and celebration of The South. $125, The Farm Old Edwards Inn, (828) 787-2625.
Dine. Indulge. Darioush: Be prepared to indulge yourself with the culinary creativity of Lakeside Restaurant and the Persian finesse of Bordeaux-inspired Darioush wines. From whites to reds, this five-course dinner will explore the multifaceted nuances of Darioush wines paired with Lakeside’s exquisitely creative cuisine. Special wine pricing will be available! Have your cellars ready! $175, Lakeside Restaurant, (828) 526-9419.
Robert Craig Wine Dinner: Featuring Durrell Vineyard Chardonnay, Affinity Cabernet, Howell Mountain Zinfandel, Howell Mountain Cabernet and Mount Veeder Cabernet. Please call for details on this special event featuring General Manager and Partner Elton Slone of Robert Craig Winery. $145; On the Verandah,
(828) 526-2338.
Northwest Pacific Wine Pairing Dinner: The Inn at Half Mile Farm and Rosewood Market invite you to join us on a wine pairing culinary adventure through the Pacific Northwest of North America-right here in Highlands. Come break bread and let your senses travel through Oregon, Washington State and into British Vancouver as we marry regional culinary treats with beautiful Northwest wines. Our talented chefs will be preparing a farm-to-table multi-course dinner — each course celebrating the best of that region. Beginning with PEI Mussels of British Columbia and ending with American Bubbles — we invite you to join us on this delicious North American adventure. $79; The Inn at Half Mile Farm; 1 (800) 946-6822.
The Ugly Dog Pub Late Night Hang Out: Join your friends at The Ugly Dog Pub for live music, seasonal cocktails and local beers. (828) 526-8364.

Saturday Events:
James Beard Award-winner Louis Osteen at Mountain Fresh Grocery: Mountain Fresh Grocery is excited to announce James Beard Chef Louis Osteen will be in our kitchen for Culinary Weekend 2014. Louis is a founding chef of the Southern Culinary Renaissance, which came out of Charleston during the late 80’s and won his James Beard Award in 2004. This marks the fourth consecutive year he has cooked with our team. Mountain Fresh Grocery, (828) 526-2400.
Writer’s Block…An Interpretation of Classics: Join Executive Chef Justin Burdett as he features nine courses of creative and innovative cuisine paired with superb wines from importer Kermit Lynch. $125, Ruka’s Table, (828) 526-3636.
A Davis Family Vineyards Affair: At Davis Family Vineyards, they believe wine is an essential element in a rich and passionate life. Here at Lakeside Restaurant we couldn’t agree more. We are very excited to partner with Owner/Winemaker Guy Davis for an evening of exquisite wines and delectable cuisine. Join Lakeside’s Chef Chris Arnold as he prepares five courses perfectly paired with the handcrafted wines of Davis Family Vineyards. Don’t miss out on the opportunity to stock your cellars as we will be offering exclusive pricing on the wines we are featuring at this dinner. A delicious evening celebrating the joys of food and wine! $125, Lakeside Restaurant (828) 526-9419.
Monticello Vineyards with Owner Stephen Corley featuring Monticello Brut, Estate Chardonnay, Estate Merlot, Jefferson Cuvee’ Cabernet and Corley Proprietary Red. Please call for details on this special event. $100, On the Verandah, (828) 526-2338.
Caymus Vineyards: We will be featuring Caymus Vineyards. Join us for a night of culinary memories and divine libations. It will be a night to remember! $150, Wolfgang’s Restaurant & Wine Bistro, (828) 526-3807.
Tales & Cocktails, The Ugly Dog Pub Bourbon Dinner: A master bartender and bourbon ambassador will host an entertaining and informative evening accompanied by a multi-course dinner. $75, Dog House Dining Room, Available at Eventbrite.
The Ugly Dog Pub Late Night Hang Out: Join your friends at The Ugly Dog Pub for live music, seasonal cocktails and local beers. (828) 526-8364.

Sunday Events:
James Beard Award-winner Louis Osteen: Louis, a longtime friend, has played a significant part in helping to define our “flavor” at Mountain Fresh Grocery and we look forward to showcasing and sharing his talents this year. Mountain Fresh Grocery, (828) 526-2400.

Fine Food for Fun and Funding

Lakeside Restaurant’s tradition of being a steadfast supporter of local causes continues October 8 when Evenings at Lakeside spotlights the Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music Festival. For more information or reservations, call (828) 526-9419.

Lakeside Restaurant’s tradition of being a steadfast supporter of local causes continues October 8 when Evenings at Lakeside spotlights the Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music Festival. For more information or reservations, call (828) 526-9419.

Lakeside Restaurant believes in giving back to the community by giving to the non-profit organizations that call Highlands home.
They recognize that these organizations provide many of the essential services that make our community great. Evenings at Lakeside are their way of saying thanks for all you do and providing support for these non-profit groups. Wednesday evenings are set aside for area non-profits to join Lakeside in raising money and awareness for their causes.
It’s not too late for interested non-profits to contact Lakeside at (828) 526-9419 to select an available date. Lakeside will donate 15 percent of the non-profit’s guest checks that evening to the non-profit. It is up to each organization and their board members to market their evening. It is also important that when making reservations you mention that you are there to support your chosen non-profit.
This year several non-profits, including the Highlands-Cashiers Hospital, Scaly Mountain Woman’s Club, Gilliam’s Promise and the Literacy Council of Highlands have already been benefactors of these increasingly successful Wednesday nights. Mark your calendars to join them on October 8 for an evening benefiting the Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music Festival.
The Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music Festival has been one of the cornerstones of the local arts community and this year marks their 33rd season of bringing some of the world’s most beautiful music to the mountains. Evenings at Lakeside provides their supporters with a unique way to give to the festival while enjoying an evening out with friends.
For more information or to make reservations, please call Lakeside. They are located at 531 Smallwood Avenue.

by Mary Jane McCall

HIghlands’ Culinary Weekend Sip and Stroll

Don’t miss the annual Sip and Stroll, Friday and Saturday, November 7 and 8, from 11:00 A.M. until 5:00 P.M.
Experience the wares of Highlands’ fine shops, while tasting and enjoying a selection of wine and delightful edibles. Sip, Stroll and Shop till you drop while enjoying everything fabulous in downtown Highlands.
Each stroller will start at the Highlands Chamber of Commerce and Visitor’s Center to receive a detailed map and their own souvenir wine glass with special carry bag. There will be a limited number of merchants this year and we encourage everyone to linger and enjoy the homemade hors d’oeuvres, cheeses, and, of course, the wonderful selections of wines. There’s also an added bonus to visiting each merchant on the map. Strollers having completed the tour will be eligible for wonderful prizes, including fine dining certificates, pottery and specialty wines.
For more information on the Sip and Stroll, Friday night’s Opening Night or Friday and Saturday’s wine dinners call (828) 526-5841.
Friday Sip and Stroll Participants: The Hen House; Highlands Fine Art & Estate Jewelry; The Southern Way; Bags on Main; TJ Bailey’s for Men; Potpourri 2; Cabin Couture; Acorns; Acorns on Church, Wit’s End, Mountain Fresh Grocery, The Ugly Dob Pub, The Silver Eagle, High Cotton Wine & Cheese Company, and The Park on Main.
Saturday Sip and Stroll Participants: Highland Hiker Cabin, Hiker on Main, Hiker Shoe Store, The Hen House, Highlands Fine Art & Estate Jewelry, The Southern Way, Bags on Main, TJ Bailey’s for Men, Cabin Casuals of Highlands, Potpourri 2, Cabin Couture, Christmas Tree on Main, Acorns, Acorns on Church, Mountain Fresh, The Ugly Dog Pub and High Cotton Wine & Cheese Company.

The Taste of the Town, Highlands’ Annual Culinary Weekend

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highlands_nc_culinary_weekend-twoFriday Events:
Sip and Stroke at The Bascom: This two-hour afternoon workshop is perfect for non-artists and beginners. Learn to recreate a well-known painting and sip while you stroke! We supply the canvas, paint and brushes. All you need to bring is a curious mind, a friend and a bottle of wine. The Bascom signature wine will be available by the glass. Register today and bring home your very own work of art. The Bascom, (828) 787-2865.
Pinot Noir Master Class: Tasting and presentation of eight Siduri Pinot Noirs with Adam Lee. We will taste eight different Siduri wines from across their California and Oregon portfolio, including some older vintages. Mountaintop Wine Shoppe; (828) 526-4080.
Mountain Fresh Five Course Porch Dinner: Join us in celebrating the iconic and diverse culinary dishes of James Beard award winning chef Louis Osteen as he prepares a multi-course dinner carefully paired with the wines of French and Italian importer Kermit Lynch. $125 per person, Mountain Fresh Grocery, (828) 526-2400.
Fourth Annual Farm Harvest Dinner and Barn Dance: Get ready for a full-on evening of authentic mountain culture. Your senses will come alive with sights, sounds, smells and flavors of farm-fresh creations being prepared live. Meet the farmers and feast on their bounty from Sunburst Trout Farm, Barker’s Creek Mill and Painted Hills Natural Beef. It’s a fun, down-on-the-farm festival of the senses and celebration of The South. $125, The Farm Old Edwards inn, (828) 787-2625.
Dine. Indulge. Darioush: Be prepared to indulge yourself with the culinary creativity of Lakeside Restaurant and the Persian finesse of Bordeaux inspired Darioush wines. From whites to reds, this five course dinner will explore the multifaceted nuances of Darioush wines paired with Lakeside’s exquisitely creative cuisine. Special wine pricing will be available! Have your cellars ready! $175, Lakeside Restaurant, (828) 526-9419.
Robert Craig Wine Dinner: Featuring Durrell Vineyard Chardonnay, Affinity Cabernet, Howell Mountain Zinfandel, Howell Mountain Cabernet and Mount Veeder Cabernet. Please call for details on this special event featuring General Manager and Partner Elton Slone of Robert Craig Winery. $145; On the Verandah, (828) 526-2338.
Northwest Pacific Wine Pairing Dinner: The Inn at Half Mile Farm and Rosewood Market invite you to join us on a wine pairing culinary adventure through the Pacific Northwest of North America-right here in Highlands, North Carolina. Come break bread and let your senses travel through Oregon, Washington State and into British Vancouver as we marry regional culinary treats with beautiful northwest wines. Our talented Chefs will be preparing a farm-to-table multi-course dinner — each course celebrating the best of that region. Beginning with PEI Mussels of British Columbia and ending with American Bubbles-we invite you to join us on this delicious North American adventure. $79.00; The Inn at Half Mile Farm; 1 (800) 946-6822.
The Ugly Dog Pub Late Night Hang Out: Join your friends at The Ugly Dog Pub for live music, seasonal cocktails and local beers. (828) 526-8364.
saturday Events:
James Beard Award Winner Louis Osteen at Mountain Fresh Grocery: Mountain Fresh Grocery is excited to announce James Beard Chef Louis Osteen will be in our kitchen for Culinary Weekend 2014. Louis is a founding Chef of the Southern Culinary Renaissance, which came out of Charleston during the late 80’s and won his James Beard Award in 2004. This marks the fourth consecutive year he has cooked with our team. Louis, a longtime friend, has played a significant part in helping to define our “flavor” at Mountain Fresh Grocery and we look forward to showcasing and sharing his talents this year. Mountain Fresh Grocery, (828) 526-2400.
Writers Block… an Interpretation of Classics: Join Executive Chef Justin Burdett as he features nine courses of creative and innovative cuisine paired with superb wines from importer Kermit Lynch. $125, Ruka’s Table, (828) 526-3636.
A Davis Family Vineyards Affair: At Davis Family Vineyards they believe wine is an essential element in a rich and passionate life. Here at Lakeside we could not agree more. We are very excited to partner with Owner/Winemaker, Guy Davis for an evening of exquisite wines and delectable cuisine. Join Lakesides’ Chef Chris Arnold as he prepares five courses perfectly paired with the handcrafted wines of Davis Family Vineyards. Don’t miss out on the opportunity to stock your cellars as we will be offering exclusive pricing on the wines we are featuring at this dinner. A delicious evening celebrating the joys of food and wine! $125, Lakeside Restaurant (828) 526-9419.
Monticello Vineyards with Owner Stephen Corley: Featuring Monticello Brut, Estate Chardonnay, Estate Merlot, Jefferson Cuvee’ Cabernet and Corley Proprietary Red. Please call for details on this special event featuring Owner, Stephen Corley of Monticello Vineyards. $100, On the
Verandah, (828) 526-2338.
Caymus Vineyards: We will be featuring Caymus Vineyards. Join us for a night of culinary memories and divine libations. It will be night to remember! $150, Wolfgang’s Restaurant & Wine Bistro, (828) 526-3807.
Tales & Cocktails, The Ugly Dog Pub Bourbon Dinner: A master bartender and bourbon ambassador will host an entertaining and informative evening accompanied by a multi-course dinner. $75, Dog House Dining Room, Available at Eventbrite.
The Ugly Dog Pub Late Night Hang Out: Join your friends at The Ugly Dog Pub for live music, seasonal cocktails and local beers. (828) 526-8364.
Sunday Events:
James Beard Award Winner Louis Osteen: Mountain Fresh Grocery is excited to announce James Beard Chef Louis Osteen will be in our kitchen for Culinary Weekend 2014. Louis is a founding Chef of the Southern Culinary Renaissance, which came out of Charleston during the late 80’s and won his James Beard Award in 2004. This marks the fourth consecutive year he has cooked with our team. Louis, a longtime friend, has played a significant part in helping to define our “flavor” at Mountain Fresh Grocery and we look forward to showcasing and sharing his talents this year. Mountain Fresh Grocery, (828) 526-2400.

Apple-lachian Gold

Fall, the season of mellow fruitfulness, is the perfect time to stage the Third Annual Apple Festival – Sunday, October 5, at High Hampton Inn.

Fall, the season of mellow fruitfulness, is the perfect time to stage the Third Annual Apple Festival – Sunday, October 5, at High Hampton Inn.

As the weather cools and the light changes to autumn gold, take your family out to discover the beauty of a just-picked apple.
Fall is upon us and that means that apples are being harvested. Apples are American’s favorite fruit, and North Carolina ranks seventh in apple production in the United States with up to 4 million bushels of apples harvested in a given year. This year’s harvest is one of the best.
Come join us October 5 at High Hampton Inn for the third annual Apple Festival. This free, day-long event, which is open to the public, is a salute to fall’s favorite fruit with a bounty of apple delicacies, Bernese Mountain Dogs showing off their wagon pulling skills, the Bailey Mountain Cloggers and artistic crafts. The fun will take place from 10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
Dawn Creasman, who with her husband owns Creasman Farms, will be at the apple festival at High Hampton Inn.
“Come to an apple festival not only to get quality fruit but to meet your grower and to talk to the grower to find out what it takes to produce your food, where it comes from and, most importantly, a way to support your local economy” says Creasman.
Creasman Farms will have on hand a homemade apple cake which recipe has been passed down in her family for 75 years, as well as 10 varieties of apples. With food and activities to suit all ages and tastes, the festival has something for everyone, even the testiest of teenagers will find something to enjoy.

Contributed by Elizabeth Fletcher

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Inspired by Tradition

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Architect Norman Davenport Askins shares his visions of glorious homes of the South in a pair of October 25 book signings – at Dovetail Antiques in Cashiers between 10:00 – 11:30 A.M. and at Acorns Boutique at Old Edwards Inn and Spa in Highlands between 12:30 – 3:00 P.M.

Architect Norman Davenport Askins shares his visions of glorious homes of the South in a pair of October 25 book signings – at Dovetail Antiques in Cashiers between 10:00 – 11:30 A.M. and at Acorns Boutique at Old Edwards Inn and Spa in Highlands between 12:30 – 3:00 P.M.

Esteemed Atlanta architect Norman Davenport Askins made his name with the clear mastery of historical precedent in his gracious and livable designs. Trained directly by primary sources –English country manors, 18th-century pattern books, and early Colonial and antebellum Southern houses — he has learned not just to imitate historical precedents, but also to think like the craftsmen who created them.
Fifteen lavishly detailed and tastefully appointed residences recall such diverse sources as Italian Renaissance country villas, hillside castles in the Dordogne, Blue Ridge Mountain vernacular houses, and the very strong presence of Colonial Revival and Federal houses in Atlanta and the greater South. They are located in the prestigious Buckhead enclave of Atlanta, along the coasts of Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina, in the Virginia Piedmont, and the mountains of North Carolina. New color photographs of interiors and landscapes, commissioned specially for the book, complement traditional hand-drawn plans and elevations.
In a special section dedicated to “Elements of Tradition,” Askins identifies the key components of traditional design and the parameters for using them successfully.
Ultimately he believes in approaching tradition with innovation and individuality — adding touches of glamour, humor, and romance that bring his houses to life.
On Saturday, October 25, Askins will be signing copies of “Inspired by Tradition” in the Highlands-Cashiers area. Meet Askins at Dovetail Antiques between 10:00 – 11:30 A.M. and at Acorns Boutique at Old Edwards Inn and Spa between 12:30 – 3:00 P.M.

Ragin’ Cajun Good Time

Sunday, October 5 is the date set for Highlands on the Half Shell,  a fund raiser for Highlands Biological Foundation.

Sunday, October 5 is the date set for Highlands on the Half Shell, a fund raiser for Highlands Biological Foundation.

Enjoy an evening of good food, rousing music and frivolity with friends as you support the Highlands Biological Foundation on Sunday, October 5. The amphitheater at the Nature Center will rock with laughter as friends chow down on oysters, shrimp and jambalaya.
Jazz lovers revel in the sounds of Asheville-based Firecracker Jazz Band, a group of multi-talented musicians who have played throughout the country including the Kennedy Center. Close your eyes and you may think that you are in the midst of such Jazz masters as Jelly Roll Morton, Louis Armstrong or Bix Beiderbecke. Since 2003, these six talented musicians have recreated the tunes of Dixieland and New Orleans jazz for thousands of jazz lovers.
Put on your dancing shoes and come on down to the Amphitheater at the Highlands Nature Center at 930 Horse Cove Road, (about two blocks past the Hudson Library). The festivities start at 4:30 P.M. and run until dark. Dress is Cajun casual.
For tickets go to www.highlandsbiological.org/half-shell/. Members $75, non-members $100. To benefit the Highlands Biological Foundation.
Hosted by Martha and Hal Stibbs, Jennie and Sto Stowers, Cookie and Harrison Jones, Nancy and Lyle Nichols, Julia and Bill Grumbles, Amanda and Greg Gregory, Vevie and Lawrence Dimmitt, Paul Sanger, and Diane and Ray McPhail. For questions,call the Biological Station at (828) 526-2623.

by Wiley Sloan

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Bolivian Mission Fundraiser

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A delicious Oktoberfest luncheon will be held at Highlands United Methodist Church October 25 to benefit the  Bolivian Mission of Highlander Dr. John Baumrucker.

A delicious Oktoberfest luncheon will be held at Highlands United Methodist Church October 25 to benefit the
Bolivian Mission of Highlander Dr. John Baumrucker.

Highlands United Methodist Church will host a benefit luncheon from 11:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. October 25 to raise funds for the ongoing Bolivian Mission of Dr. John Baumrucker.
Choose from bratwurst, premium hotdog, or a hamburger. Add sauerkraut, coleslaw, or potato salad and chips. For dessert, you have to try some of the homemade apple or blueberry pies. The menu is a la cart so the price you pay depends on the items that you choose. No reservations are required. To doubly support the Mission why not add a little extra to your tab?
You’ll have the opportunity to meet two Bolivian boys who are in Highlands this year going to school. This will also be a great time to do some Christmas shopping. Dr. John Baumrucker will be showcasing some of the handmade wooden pens and pencils made by the boys at the Foster Home in Bolivia. He will also have some of his delicious home baked pies. You can even order special pies for the holidays including pear/raisin, and apple strudel with nuts and raisins.
If you cannot join us for lunch but would like to support the Mission, mail your tax deductible donation to Dr. John Baumrucker at P O Box 295, Scaly Mountain, N.C. 28775. Call Dr. John at (828) 526-3605 if you want a pie or want to help with the Mission.

by Wiley Sloan

One of the most cherished dates on the Highlands Calendar is the Highlands School PTO Fall Festival, set for Saturday, October 18, in the old gym. Everyone is invited.

Highlands School Fall Festival

If you’re a kid or you’d like to recapture the heady excitement of your youth, don’t miss the Highlands School PTO Fall Festival, slated for 5:00 to 9:00 P.M. Saturday, October 18, in the old gym at Highlands School.
The festival is a glorious celebration of small town life, with great food and exciting activities for children and adults. You’ll discover the Senior Class’ chilling Haunted Maze, a 20-foot obstacle course, Velcro Wall and Bounce House, hay rides, face paint and hair spray, a fishing pond, pirate dig, soccer, basketball, football booths and balloon dart toss. Of course, no fall celebration would be complete without funnel cakes, popcorn, caramel apples, and cotton candy.
Each class has prepared a theme box filled with great items that will be available at the Great Silent Theme Box Auction. There will also be the traditional Fall Festival Raffle, where tickets are $1 each or 6 for $5.
The Senior Class and parents donate their time and energy giving back to their school by running the game booths. In return, the PTO provides caps and gowns for graduation. All teachers and staff at the school volunteer for at least two hours to receive money for their individual classrooms. PTO board members and parents fill in the remaining volunteer positions and bake cakes and goodies for the kitchen and cake walk.
It takes a community effort to make the festival a success. This success goes directly back into the classrooms and again reaches every child at Highlands School.
Be part of our success…bring your whole family for a night of affordable fun and support a great cause!

Contributed by Andrea Chalker

Chocolate Fantasy

Your richest Chocolate Fantasy is a Chocolate Reality at the Highlands Own Arts & Crafts Show, Saturday, October 11, thanks to the wonderful members of the Scaly Mountain Women’s Club.

Your richest Chocolate Fantasy is a Chocolate Reality at the Highlands Own Arts & Crafts Show, Saturday, October 11, thanks to the wonderful members of the Scaly Mountain Women’s Club.

Indulge your love of chocolate by visiting the popular Scaly Mountain Women’s Club Chocolate Fantasy Booth at the Highlands Annual Arts and Craft Fair on Saturday, October 11, from 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. at the Highlands Recreation Center.
Once again the club will provide a wonderful array of chocolate delights including lovely cakes, brownies, cookies, and candies. The popular Kahlua Cake is always a big hit as well as the other specialty cakes, sumptuous cookies, decadent bars, chocolate dipped pretzels, buckeyes and chocolate mice. Everything is homemade and beautifully wrapped and makes a wonderful gift or a very special dessert for your own evening meal.
Proceeds from this popular booth are used to provide scholarships for 13 local area students as well as donations to area human service agencies. The club’s scholarship program is one of the largest in the area. Scholarship students are eligible to receive $6,800 in total aid if they complete four years
of college.
The Scaly Mountain Women’s Club is thankful to the support it has received from area businesses, residents and visitors who have supported its Pancake Breakfasts, Annual Auction and Chocolate Fantasy. Their generosity has helped to provide funds for scholarships and donations to agencies that provide important services to our communities. This year’s Pancake Breakfasts have been well-attended and the Annual Auction exceeded all expectations.
In addition to the Chocolate Fantasy, there will be one more Pancake Breakfast on October 25 at the Scaly Mountain Community Center on the corner of Highway 106 and Buck Knob Road in Scaly Mountain. The delicious breakfast is served from 7:30 until 10:30 A.M. For more information on this working club, visit www.scalymountainwomensclub.org.

Contributed by Carolyn Kutt

Pumpkin Patch Festival

Highlands United Methodist Church will stage its Pumpkin Festival, complete with face painting, decorating contests, a bake sale, lunch and,  of course, lots and lots of pumpkins, from 11:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. Saturday, October 4.

Highlands United Methodist Church will stage its Pumpkin Festival, complete with face painting, decorating contests, a bake sale, lunch and, of course, lots and lots of pumpkins, from 11:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. Saturday, October 4.

It’s undeniably October when Highlands United Methodist Church transforms its front lawn into a pumpkin patch and gourd gallery.
On Saturday, October 4, from 11:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M., the church will stage its Pumpkin Festival on the grounds at 315 Main Street. All funds raised will underwrite the Youth Mission trips to Bolivia, Haiti, and Atlanta.
The church will be offering a range of pumpkin sizes, shapes and colors. It’s a spectacle that’s served as the setting for a thousand irresistible seasonal photos. All pumpkin purchasers get a coupon to Kilwins.
To pre-order or to buy a large number of pumpkins to decorate your business, call Jennifer Forrester at (828) 526-3376 or e-mail her at humcjennifer@gmail.com. If you can’t make the Festival on Saturday, pumpkins will be available beginning Thursday, October 2, weekdays from 11:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.; Saturdays from 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.; and Sundays from noon to 4:00 P.M.
But the sale of pumpkins is only a portion of the festival. There’ll also be a Pumpkin Decorating Contest, face-painting, a panoply of fresh-baked goods for sale and the unmistakable warmth that exemplifies the best of small town life.
The church will also be serving up lunch – hot dogs, Boy Scout Fries, a soft drink or bottled water and a homemade brownie for $5.
If you’d like to donate baked goods, contact Jennifer at the number above.

by Wiley Sloan

The Hiker Jam Oktoberfest, set for October 25 at the Village Green in Cashiers, is a seasonal celebration for everyone in the twin communities. 
For more information, visit The Lost Hiker in Highlands or www.HikerJam.com.

Hiker Jam Octoberfest

The Hiker Jam Oktoberfest, set for October 25 at the Village Green in Cashiers, is a seasonal celebration for everyone in the twin communities.  For more information, visit The Lost Hiker in Highlands or www.HikerJam.com.

The Hiker Jam Oktoberfest, set for October 25 at the Village Green in Cashiers, is a seasonal celebration for everyone in the twin communities. For more information, visit The Lost Hiker in Highlands or www.HikerJam.com.

Anyone who’s been to The Lost Hiker in Highlands knows they do it right. It’s not just a bar. It’s a community gathering place with live music, karaoke, darts and billiards.
On Saturday, October 25, owner Clinton O’Brien will be living his dream, as he brings to life Hiker Jam Oktoberfest in Cashiers at The Village Green.
Event planner Erin Moffitt says they’ll be utilizing the entire 12.5 acre site with two music stages; food vendors; retail vendors; artists; beer tents and a dedicated kid-friendly area with special activities for the children.
Food will be provided by Mountain Fresh Grocery, The Highlands Smokehouse, Home Free Bagels, Debbie’s Dogs, and the Root Down food truck. Gates open at 10 A.M. and close at 11 P.M. so you can plan to stay all day. Children will enjoy the bouncy house and popcorn and cotton candy vendors and adults will be able to enter the beer tasting tent at no extra charge. There you’ll be able to sample free beer from eight different breweries that will also have individual tents where festival-goers can purchase their favorite brew. Empire Distributors will be there with a draft trailer featuring eight beers on tap.
And since it’s a music festival, the Hiker Jam Oktoberfest has something for everyone. Featured groups include headliners the Corbitt Brothers, along with Porch 40; Nitrograss; Hurricane Creek; Homemade Wine; Jay Drummonds; Mike and Si; Dustin Martin and the Ramblers and the Travers Brothers. By the way, The Corbitt Brothers will be playing at The Lost Hiker Friday night before the festival to kick off a memorable weekend.
General admission ticket prices are $25 and V.I.P. tickets sell for $100. V.I.P. ticket holders will have covered seating closest to the stage and an open bar with catered refreshments and table service. Bring your chairs and blankets but no food or coolers, please. Well-behaved pets are welcomed. For more information on the Hiker Jam Oktoberfest or to find out how you can become a sponsor or vendor, visit www.HikerJam.com or The Lost Hiker on Facebook. Of course, you can always stop by or give them a call at (828) 526-8232. They’re located at 476 Carolina Way in Highlands, across from Macon Bank. Sponsors for the Hiker Jam Oktoberfest include Landmark Realty Group, GCAMA, The Laurel Magazine, WHLC FM 104.5, Mountain Fresh Grocery, Cyprus International Cuisine and The Highlands Smokehouse.

by Jenny King

Art, Food, Fun

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Highlands will shine October 11 with a pair of inimitable events – Highlands Own Arts & Crafts Show and the 2nd Annual HomeTown Day.  For more information, call Rebecca Shuler at (828) 526-2118.

Highlands will shine October 11 with a pair of inimitable events – Highlands Own Arts & Crafts Show and the 2nd Annual HomeTown Day. For more information, call Rebecca Shuler at (828) 526-2118.

Local crafters are putting the finishing touches on their creations for the 32nd annual Highlands Own Arts & Crafts Show and Highlanders will be gathering for the 2nd Annual HomeTown Day. On Saturday, October 11, the town hopes residents and visitors alike will come out to support both events.
The Highlands Own Arts & Crafts Show will be held at the Highlands Civic Center from 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. With closet and professional crafters, there is sure to be something that appeals to all. The Highlands Chapter #284 Order of the Eastern Star will be serving breakfast and lunch including Dennis “Doc” Wilson’s famous barbecue throughout the day as well.
HomeTown Day activities will be hosted at Kelsey Hutchinson Park. Activities will include craft and farmers’ market vendors, food, music, clogging and activities for the whole family. This year’s performers will be the Boys from Tuckasegee, also featured at this year’s Mountain Heritage Day.
Information can be found at www.highlandsnc.org or by contacting Rebecca Shuler at Town Hall by phone at (828) 526-2118, by email at rebecca.shuler@highlandsnc.org, or mail PO Box 460, Highlands, NC 28741. All proceeds and donations will benefit the Highlands Scholarship Fund.

by Wiley Sloan | Photos by Sarah Valentine

The Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music Festival is offering its breathtaking Bear Shadow Viewing and Wine Dinner, 
set for 5:00 P.M. Thursday, October 23. For information and reservations, call (828) 526-9060.

Bear Shadow Wine Dinner

The Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music Festival is offering its breathtaking Bear Shadow Viewing and Wine Dinner,  set for 5:00 P.M. Thursday, October 23. For information and reservations, call (828) 526-9060.

The Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music Festival is offering its breathtaking Bear Shadow Viewing and Wine Dinner, set for 5:00 P.M. Thursday, October 23. For information and reservations, call (828) 526-9060.

The Whiteside Mountain Shadow of the Bear and the Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music Festival have been around for a long, long time.
Well, the Shadow has been around approximately 500 million years longer than the Chamber Music Festival, but the Festival’s 33 years is nothing to sneeze at.
Both local institutions will be in the spotlight at the exciting 2014 Bear Shadow Viewing and Wine Dinner, set for 5:00 P.M. Thursday, October 23. Local philanthropists Ed and Penny Mawyer are opening their home for an extraordinary dinner presented and prepared by New Mountain Events — Sean Dobruck and Chef Mark Ellis. Cost of the dinner is $250 and benefits the Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music.
Wonderful as the meal promises to be, for many the highlight of the evening will be viewing the sublime Shadow of the Bear from the comfort of the Mawyer’s home. The “shadow of the bear” is visible for 30 minutes daily between 5:30 and 6:15 P.M. from mid-October through early November. The Mawyer’s home (located at 5818 Bear Shadow Ridge) offers an unparalleled vantage point for this unique phenomenon.
The past 33 concert seasons have brought together artists whose standards of excellence and commitment to chamber music have enriched the creative traditions of Highlands, Cashiers and the Western Carolina mountains. Next year’s 34th season will certainly continue that tradition with another exciting mix of old friends and new faces, the fun series “Bach at Buck’s” featuring solo and duo string music in the informal setting of a coffee house in both the Highlands and Cashiers locations and lectures in conjunction with the Center of Life Enrichment.
Space is limited and reservations are required. For information and reservations, call (828) 526-9060.

by Luke Osteen

It’s all Treats and no Tricks at Highlands Downtown Trick or Treat, set for 6:00 P.M. Friday, October 31.

Highlands Halloween

It’s all Treats and no Tricks at Highlands Downtown Trick or Treat, set for 6:00 P.M. Friday, October 31.

It’s all Treats and no Tricks at Highlands Downtown Trick or Treat, set for 6:00 P.M. Friday, October 31.

For more than 20 years, youngsters of all ages have been enjoying a community Halloween celebration on the streets of downtown Highlands.
Downtown Trick or Treat, which is sponsored by the Highlands Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Center, provides a safe, fun-filled environment for Trick-or-Treaters of all ages.
Even those with no children will find plenty to celebrate on Main and Fourth Streets, starting at 6:00 P.M., Friday October 31.
That’s when local kids, decked out in their spookiest, silliest and cutest costumes, gather to collect a teacher’s ransom of candy distributed by local businesses and charities.
Downtown Highlands will be closed to traffic to ensure a safe evening for everyone. Virtually the entire community – kids, grown-ups, pets – shows up in costume to celebrate. This year, you can expect to see Guardians of the Galaxy, princesses, zombies, Angry Birds, Minions from “Despicable Me,” and a century’s worth of pop culture references.
The terrace at Town Square is a perfect venue for music. There’ll be free hot dogs served up by the Highlands Mountaintop Rotary Club, hot chocolate and cider, and free pizza at Highlands United Methodist Church prior to the Trick or Treating.
It all adds up to an unforgettable evening of fun, sweet treats, and more than a few surprises.
Main Street will be closed to traffic starting at 5:30 to safely accommodate all revelers.
(Due to certain unfortunate “incidents” during the 2009 Downtown Trick or Treat, zombies must be kept on a leash at all times.)

by Luke Osteen | Photo by Sarah Valentine

Cashiers Cares Annual Event

Since its earliest days, the residents of Cashiers have had a tradition of caring for their neighbors.
That’s why Cashiers Cares is such a natural fit to this dynamic community. Established in 2008, it’s collected and distributed approximately $90,000 to local organizations. That generosity has helped to support Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Cashiers; the Blue Ridge Free Dental Clinic; Cashiers-Highlands Humane Society; the Clean Slate Coalition; the Community Care Clinic; Fishes and Loaves Food Pantry; Four Seasons Hospice Care Life Challenge of Western North Carolina; the Literacy Council of Cashiers and The United Christian Ministries of Cashiers.
Of course, all of this community compassion requires a generous spirit among Cashiers’ citizens. If you’d like to help, send tax-deductible contributions to P.O. Box 1072, Cashiers, NC 28717.
If you’d like to see Cashiers Cares in action, wait for the Christmas season.
“Cashiers Cares hosts an annual Christmas event following the Christmas Parade — this year it is on December 13,” says Cashiers Cares spokeswoman Lynne Keating. “We partner with Rotary who comes and cooks, providing a free lunch of hot dogs and chili and drinks and cookies for anyone who comes. If the weather is good we expect over 300 people. It will be at the old Community Center.
“The non-profits we fund will have tables set up inside and reps are there to tell anyone who wishes to learn about what services they provide. The original concept is that people can come to the lunch and make donations to the charities as a Christmas “gift” in honor of someone else. Each charity has a list of “gifts” which certain dollar amounts purchase. For example, $10 provides three days of food for a family of two at the Fishes and Loaves Food Pantry.
“We set up a photo op with Santa in his sleigh and kids can get free pictures. The whole event lasts only a couple of hours, but it is great fun to see families come and eat and marvel at Santa.”

by Luke Osteen

There’s nothing to be scared of – Goblins in the Green is a safe, joyful celebration for everyone in the community. 
Join everyone at The Village Green at 6:00 P.M. Friday, October 24.

A Ghoulishly Good Time

There’s nothing to be scared of – Goblins in the Green is a safe, joyful celebration for everyone in the community.  Join everyone at The Village Green at 6:00 P.M. Friday, October 24.

There’s nothing to be scared of – Goblins in the Green is a safe, joyful celebration for everyone in the community.
Join everyone at The Village Green at 6:00 P.M. Friday, October 24.

For the second year in a row, Mummies and Daddies will be invading The Village Green in Cashiers with witches, zombies and superheroes for Goblins In the Green at 6:00 P.M. Friday, October 24. The evening will begin with a costume contest at The Village Green Commons on Frank Allen Road near the Post Office.
“Dress in your best costume for a ghoulishly good time; the best costume will win a prize,” says Ann Self, Executive Director of The Village Green.
Goblins In the Green is organized and presented in partnership by the Jackson County Parks and Recreation Department, S’More Kids Klothes and the nonprofit organization, The Village Green.
The highlight of the evening is the Trick or Treat Trail throughout The Village Green. “Come collect candy from costumed characters, local businesses and organizations,” says Self.
This free community event also includes spooky inflatables and a family friendly hayride through town. Trick or Treaters are encouraged to bring their goodie buckets and a flashlight.
“The Village Green is a safe place for families and friends to enjoy Halloween festivities,” says Village Green Chairperson Jochen Lucke.
The Village Green is a 12.5 acre park in the heart of Cashiers that hosts thousands of visitors and more than 100 events each year. The park is for public enjoyment but is operated and maintained through private funding.
“The Village Green is able to help create cherished community traditions and events like Goblins In the Green at no charge because of individual donors who make financial gifts to support the park,” Self says. “We are grateful to the generosity of those who make contributions.”
For more information, visit www.villagegreencashiersnc.com. You can also “Like” The Village Green on Facebook or follow on Twitter @cashiersgreen.

Rocktober Weekends

Macon Grass Band

Macon Grass Band

October in Highlands: Just about everyone’s favorite month in the mountains.
What’s not to love? You’ve got clear blue skies, crisp air, the ubiquitous pumpkins and, of course, leaves, leaves leaves.
Well, add the mix of Friday Night Live and Saturdays on Pine, and everything just got a lot more fun! Thanks to the Highlands Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center the free concerts on Friday nights will continue through the month of October. Friday Night Live is held from 6:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M. at Town Square in the middle of Main Street and features some of the best mountain music in these parts.
You can expect to hear traditional Appalachian rhythms from each of the four scheduled bands, which include The Mountain Dulcimer Group, October 3; The Johnny Webb Band, October 10; Southern Highroads, October 17; and finally on October 24, the Macon Grass Band. There will be no concert on Friday, October 31 since that’s the renowned Halloween celebration in Highlands. For more information on these and other activities in Highlands call the Highlands Visitor Center at (828) 526-2112.
Fridays won’t be the only chance to hear live music in downtown Highlands, though. Thanks to Kay and Thomas Craig at The Ugly Dog Pub as well as other sponsors, Saturday evenings will be humming as well.
The popular Saturdays on Pine concert series will continue through October. Those concerts begin at 6:00 P.M. and are held at the Kelsey-Hutchinson Park on Pine Street in Highlands. This summer’s concert series brought to town some of the biggest names in the area like Homemade Wine, Copious Jones and The Lonesome Road Band. To find out what’s in store for October, just stop by the Chamber of Commerce, The Ugly Dog Pub or the shops and restaurants in Highlands for schedule cards so you don’t miss a single minute of fun. Bring your blankets, chairs and coolers, friends and family for an evening of rockin’ entertainment. Since both venues are outdoors and it is October, better bring a sweater or jacket ‘cause it’s going to be chilly! Better yet, stock up on a few winter items from any of the excellent retailers in town!

by Jenny King

Scouting Out a Good Time

Test your luck, share a laugh with your neighbors and support local Cub Scouts – it’s Cub Scout Bingo, October 2 at the Highlands Community Building.

Test your luck, share a laugh with your neighbors and support local Cub Scouts – it’s Cub Scout Bingo, October 2 at the Highlands Community Building.

Bingo enthusiasts are cleaning their green eye shades and dusting off their hearing aids.
Their “lucky cards” are waiting for Cub Scout Bingo on Thursday, October 2. Games start at 6:30 P.M. at the Highlands Community Building next door to the ball park on US 64 (the Cashiers Road).
If you are the person who says “I never win anything,” then they have a game just for you. Play The Biggest Loser — if you are the last person to get their first space covered you win a prize.
Bingo is the best bargain in town. For a mere $15 for the whole night (one card, 15 games), you will have an entertaining evening while supporting the Cub Scouts of the area. The Highlands Cub Scout Pack 207 helps young men learn all types of skills that benefit them throughout their lifetime. Should you win a prize, you can donate your winnings back to the Scouts.
If you wish, you may sponsor a Table Ad. You can show your support of the Scouts by making a donation and sponsoring a table. A one-page ad is only $50; half-page ads $25. Make your checks payable to the Cub Scout Pack 207. Send them to Phil Potts at P.O. Box 1959, Highlands, NC 28741 or call him at (828) 200-9753. Half of the Bingo money goes to Cub Scouts and the other half will go to lucky Bingo winners. Game Number 15 gives you the chance to win some serious money.
Laugh a lot, share with friends and support the Scouts.
See you there.

by Wiley Sloan

It’s the Little Things

Look up the word “enrichment” and you will get a variety of definitions.
Webster’s definition is: “Enrichment — (noun) the act of making rich, or that which enriches; increase of value by improvements, embellishment, etc.; decoration.”
There are countless ways to enrich one’s life. Smiling more enriches one’s life, changing your perspective by looking on the positive side of things rather than the negative enriches one’s life. Taking time to enjoy the little things, such as the changing of the seasons or viewing a gorgeous sunset from Sunset Rock are great ways to enrich your life.
Educating yourself is another wonderful enriching activity and the Center for Life Enrichment has a variety of classes to increase your knowledge and expand your horizons on interesting topics and important issues. You can improve your computer skills in one of our computer classes, get a different view on an important historic event, learn about the life and work of a great composer, maybe meet a well-known author that you’ve read and enjoyed.
Why not indulge your creativity in a cooking class, or a drawing or painting class…maybe you have always wanted to take up photography? A new hobby can be very enriching.
So if you’re in pursuit of self-improvement or wanting to add more “enriching” activities to your life, smile and contact the Center for Life Enrichment for an array of life embellishing options.
For more information on the Center for Life Enrichment and our classes or to become a member, please call (828) 526-8811, visit clehighlands.com, email us at clehighlands@yahoo.com, or stop by the CLE office as 348 South Fifth Street in the lower level of the Peggy Crosby Center in Highlands.

Contributed by Bonnie Dayton

Secrets of Autumn Splendor

The Highlands Nature Center celebrates the magic of the season with a Fall Leaf Color Program for the entire family – Saturday, October 4.  The Nature Center is located across from Sunset Rock on Horse Cove Road.

The Highlands Nature Center celebrates the magic of the season with a Fall Leaf Color Program for the entire family – Saturday, October 4. The Nature Center is located across from Sunset Rock on Horse Cove Road.

Leaf color is a result of pigments present in the leaf, which help to absorb sunlight for photosynthesis (the process by which the leaf turns sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide into glucose sugar, its food).
Different pigments absorb different colors, or wavelengths, of sunlight. Each color has its own energy level — violets and blues contain the highest energy, so they are absorbed the most by the leaf. The remaining colors have less energy and are instead reflected as visible light, making the leaf appear green, red, or yellow.
The main pigment is chlorophyll, which appears green, but yellow xanthrophyll and red carotene are also present. Leaves do not “turn” yellow or red; instead they “lose their green.”
Chlorophyll absorbs the highest levels of energy in sunlight, so green is present during spring and summer when the warm weather and intense sunlight allow for more plant growth. However, yellow xanthrophyll and red carotenes are always present to absorb other high-energy wavelengths. As the season changes to fall, green chlorophyll slowly begins to fade away, revealing the yellow and red pigments hidden beneath.
The Nature Center is offering a Fall Leaf Color family program on October 4 from 2:00 — 4:00 P.M. Activities will focus on how leaves change color, deciduous versus coniferous trees, and winter survival strategies of each. Afterwards, visitors will be led on a walk through the Botanical Garden to identify different trees by leaf type, shape, and color.
Fun and educational for all ages, this program costs only $5. Call (828) 526-2623 to sign up.
The Nature Center is located at the Highlands Biological Station, which fosters research and education focused on the southern Appalachian environment. At the Station, we believe that the best way to learn is to experience, so stop by the Nature Center to learn more about leaves “losing their green,” or take a walk in the Botanical Garden to see our native plants in their autumn splendor. For more information, visit www.highlandsbiological.org.

Contributed by Patrick Brannon, Director of the Highlands Nature Center
Photo by Charles Johnson

Big Names, Big Fun at PAC

The Martin-Lipscomb Performing Arts Center offers a pair of unforgettable musical performances – The Seldom Scene on September 27  and Broadway star Liz Callaway on October 4. For information or reservations, call (828) 526-9047.

The Martin-Lipscomb Performing Arts Center offers a pair of unforgettable musical performances – The Seldom Scene on September 27
and Broadway star Liz Callaway on October 4. For information or reservations, call (828) 526-9047.

Bluegrass returns to PAC at 8:00 P.M. Saturday, September 27, with the legendary group The Seldom Scene.
What does it take for a bluegrass band to remain popular for more than four decades? For Seldom Scene, it’s taken not only talented musicians, a signature sound, and a solid repertoire, but also a sheer sense of fun. On April 22, the longtime pillars of the bluegrass world returned with the aptly titled “Long Time…Seldom Scene. The newly recorded collection features fresh interpretations of 16 oft-requested tunes and is the band’s first studio album since the Grammy-nominated album “Scenechronized” in 2007. The new album features founding members Tom Gray and John Starling and guests Chris Eldridge, Emmylou Harris, and Rickie Simpkins. It’s been over 40 years since they began playing together at weekly jam sessions. The Seldom Scene have become one of the single greatest contributors to the progression of bluegrass while setting a new standard and attracting new audiences to the genre, including bluegrass versions of country music, rock, and even classical pop. The band’s popularity soon forced them to play more than once a week — but they continued to maintain their image as being seldom seen, and on several of their early album covers were photographed with the stage lights on only their feet, or with their backs to the camera.
On Saturday, October 4, it’s “Broadway and More” with Broadway veteran Liz Callaway. Liz Callaway is a Tony-nominee and Emmy Award-winning actress, singer and recording artist. She made her Broadway debut in Stephen Sondheim’s “Merrily We Roll Along,” received a Tony Award nomination for her performance in “Baby,” and for five years, won acclaim as Grizabella in “Cats.” She has also starred in the original casts of “Miss Saigon,” “The Three Musketeers,” and “The Look of Love.”
Tickets are available online at highlandspac.org or by calling (828) 526-9047. Highlands PAC is located at 507 Chestnut Street in Highlands.

Contributed by Mary Adair Leslie

PAC Meets the Met and More

The Performing Arts Center delves into the kaleidoscopic possibilities of HD performances of opera, drama and ballet.  For tickets and information, call (828) 526-9047.

The Performing Arts Center delves into the kaleidoscopic possibilities of HD performances of opera, drama and ballet.
For tickets and information, call (828) 526-9047.

Exciting things happened at The Performing Arts Center over the summer. Live in HD has expanded to include not only the MET Opera, but now the National Theatre of London and the Bolshoi Ballet.
Coming up in September, the MET Opera is offering two encore performances. On Wednesday, September 10, it’s “Otello” by Verdi; originally broadcast on October 27, 2012. Verdi’s Shakespearean masterpiece returns to the Met with Johan Botha in the title role opposite the acclaimed Desdemona of star soprano Renée Fleming. Conductor is Seymon Bychkov.
PAC offers “The Enchanted Island” on Wednesday, September 17. This was originally broadcast on January 21, 2012. In a story drawn from Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” the lovers are shipwrecked on his other-worldly island of “The Tempest.” Inspired by the musical pastiches and masques of the 18th century, the work showcases Handel, Vivaldi, Rameau, and others, and a new libretto devised and written by Jeremy Sams. Eminent conductor William Christie leads an all-star cast with David Daniels, Joyce DiDonato, and Plácido Domingo. The Met Opera Encore performance ticket prices are $15 Adults (for PAC members and MET members $12.75) and Students are $7. Encore performances begin at 7:00 P.M. with a pre-opera discussion beginning at 6:30 P.M.
The MET Opera 2014-15 Live in HD Season begins on Saturday, October 11 with “Macbeth” by Verdi and Saturday, October 18, with “Le Nozze Di Figaro” by Mozart. These performances begin at 12:55 P.M. with the pre-opera discussion beginning
at 12:30 P.M.
The National Theatre of London will present two offerings in September; on Friday, September 19, it’s “Medea” by Euripides in a new version by Ben Power. Helen McCrory takes the title role in Euripides’ powerful tragedy. And on Tuesday, September 16, “A Streetcar Named Desire” by Tennessee Williams. Benedict Andrews is the visionary director of the highly anticipated production of the timeless masterpiece, starring Gillian Anderson, Ben Foster and Vanessa Kirby. The National Theatre performances will begin at 7:00 P.M. Tickets are $18 for Adults (PAC Members: $15.30)
The Bolshoi Ballet begins in November. Tickets for all Live in HD Series performances are available online: highlandspac.org or by calling (828) 526-9047. The Performing Arts Center is located at 507 Chestnut Street in Highlands.

Contributed by Mary Adair Leslie

Annual Apple Festival

Fall, the season of mellow fruitfulness, is the perfect time to stage the Third Annual Apple Festival – Sunday, October 5, at High Hampton Inn.

Fall, the season of mellow fruitfulness, is the perfect time to stage the Third Annual Apple Festival – Sunday, October 5, at High Hampton Inn.

As the weather cools and the light changes to autumn gold, take your family out to discover the beauty of a just-picked apple.
Fall is upon us and that means that apples are being harvested. Apples are American’s favorite fruit, and North Carolina ranks seventh in apple production in the United States with up to 4 million bushels of apples harvested in a given year. This year’s harvest is one of the best.
Come join us October 5 at High Hampton Inn for the third annual Apple Festival. This free, day-long event, which is open to the public, is a salute to fall’s favorite fruit with a bounty of apple delicacies, Bernese Mountain Dogs showing off their wagon pulling skills, the Bailey Mountain Cloggers and artistic crafts. The fun will take place from 10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
Dawn Creasman, who with her husband owns Creasman Farms, will be at the apple festival at High Hampton Inn.
“Come to an apple festival not only to get quality fruit but to meet your grower and to talk to the grower to find out what it takes to produce your food, where it comes from and, most importantly, a way to support your local economy,” says Creasman.
Creasman Farms will have on hand a homemade apple cake which recipe has been passed down in her family for 75 years, as well as 10 varieties of apples. With food and activities to suit all ages and tastes, the festival has something for everyone, even the testiest of teenagers will find something to enjoy.

Contributed by Elizabeth Fletcher

Bowling Over Hunger

At least 16 percent of the residents of Jackson and Macon Counties suffer from food insecurity.
Many more are self-sufficient so long as no emergency arises. However, injury, sickness or the loss of a job can suddenly throw an individual or a family into a crisis situation.
No one should be forced to live without food. But many in our area do.
The Empty Bowls Project is an international movement to help feed the hungry right here in our own communities. Two local organizations, the International Friendship Center in Highlands and the Fishes and Loaves Food Pantry in Cashiers are sponsoring The Empty Bowls Project in October to support our local food banks.
The Empty Bowls Project is built upon a single idea: Potters and other craftspeople, educators and volunteers work within the community to create handcrafted bowls. Guests are invited to a simple meal of soup and bread and, in exchange for a cash donation, are asked to keep their bowl as a cherished keepsake and a timely reminder of the needs of the world. The money raised is donated to end hunger and food insecurity locally.
In the past three years, The Bascom has contributed over 2,400 bowls for the event, which get filled with soup and bread donated by local restaurants. The cost is $20.
The Empty Bowls Project in Cashiers will be held Sunday, October 5, at the historic Zachary-Tolbert House from 11:30 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. and all proceeds will go to the Fishes and Loaves Food Pantry in Cashiers. For anyone who cannot attend, tickets and bowls can be purchased prior to the event at the Cashiers Historical Society For more information, call Carole Stork
at (828) 743-3222.
The Empty Bowls Project in Highlands will be held the following Sunday, October 12, at the First Presbyterian Church of Highlands, beginning at 11:45 A.M. All proceeds will benefit the The Food Pantry in Highlands. For more information, contact Faviola Olvera at the International Friendship Center. (828) 526-0890.
Join the movement. Let your empty bowl be a reminder that our community can help.

by Jenny King